JetNation

Members
  • Content count

    10,637
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

3,899 Neutral

About JetNation

  • Rank
    An Original JNer

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.jetnation.com

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling

Personal Info

  • Where do you live?
    the interweb
  • What are your interests? Hobbies?
    New York Jets
  • What do you do for a living?
    I am a Jets website.

Jets Info

  • What is your favorite Jets related memory?
    When the Jets won the Super Bowl in 2012. Oh sorry, forgot that you can't see the future.
  • Do you have season tickets?
    No, I do everything online.
  • What Jets memory broke your heart?
    When the Jets fired Herman Edwards. He kept me busy.
  • Where you alive for Super Bowl III?
    No, I was born in 2005.
  1. On this week’s episode of JetNation Radio Joe will be joined by Kyle Smith from the AFCEastBros Podcast and they have a lot to talk about! What did they observe in the preseason game against the Washington Redskins? Is Bryce Petty really an option as the #2 QB? How many wide receivers will the Jets keep and who? How did the younger guys look in the preseason game? Is Karlos Williams a guy the Jets would want to sign? All of these topics and many more will be discussed on this episode of JetNation Radio. Click here to read the full story...
  2. By Glenn Naughton Buffalo Bills beat writer/sideline reporter is reporting that the Jets are currently meeting with recently released Buffalo Bills running back Karlos Williams. Williams was let go by the Bills just days ago after learning of a four-game suspension for violating the league’s substance abuse policy after a rookie season in which he rushed the ball 93 times for 517 yards, an average of 5.6 yards per attempt, en route to 7 touchdowns on the ground. Should the two sides reach an agreement, Williams would join an already crowded backfield that includes running backs Matt Forte, Bilal Powell and Khiry Robinson. Click here to read the full story...
  3. He did great in the preseason game against Washington, but how will Darrelle Revis do the rest of the season with his wrist injury? Leave your comments below! Click here to read the full story...
  4. As the Jets prepare for the ever important bragging rights in the upcoming Snoopy Bowl battle; some players returned to the field while others sat out. Topping the list is Quincy Enunwa who sustained a concussion against the Redskins. Todd Bowles expressed his concern for any player who receives a concussion but indicated Quincy was getting better. Quincy is doing better. He’s walking around. (He’s) still not ready to practice yet. Jordan Jenkins left practice with a calf injury. Other players who missed practice on Monday: Romar Morris and Dominique Williams… They’re coming along. Dominique is getting better and Romar’s shoulder is getting better, so it’s a time table when they’ll be ready, but they’re getting better everyday. Devin Smith He’s still rehabbing. He’s coming along. He’s been post-op for a while now, but he’s getting healthier. He’s running straight ahead, but it’s a matter of coming out here and running side-to-side. Once I talk with the trainers and see the estimation of his recovery I’ll determine that, but right now we’re not sure yet. On whether Muhammad Wilkerson has taken any steps forward… He’s getting his legs underneath him. He’s getting used to the pads and he’s getting used to the hitting which he wasn’t used to before. He was just working out before. As he gets used to that and his legs stay fresh, we’re moving him up little-by-little. Jace Amaro missed practice but Bowles said he was sore and didn’t think it would keep him out of the Giants game on Saturday. Click here to read the full story...
  5. Robby Anderson is an undrafted free agent out of Temple University, mainly known for his speed. He has a wiry build, but reportedly ran a 4.34 at his pro-day, which would have equated to second among wide receivers in this year’s combine behind Will Fuller. Anderson has flashed at times during practice, but Week 2 was his coming out party. Let’s see how he did: 1) The first play here is actually somewhat negative, and Anderson isn’t really involved in the play. On this play, Anderson runs a slant route, but is well covered by the CB. Anderson shows a lack of dedication on this route, as the CB is absolutely sure he is going inside, and doesn’t bite on the outside fake as well. This is one of the reasons why he fell in the draft, because he’s not quite polished as a route runner. While he has a good route tree, he doesn’t sell fakes well enough right now. This is something to monitor as we move forward, because he does have a good amount of ability, so improving the route running skills would go a long way for his production. On this play, Geno Smith makes a good throw to Charone Peake. 2) This play is a simple zone read for Anderson. The Redskins are in zone coverage, and the LBs drop back, Anderson finds a soft spot in the zone and plays catch with Geno Smith. The read on this play is the LB covering Anderson to start the play. If he follows Anderson inside, then Tommy Bohanon is open on a comeback route, especially with the CB playing deep. The route shows good recognition of coverage, and good timing with Geno. 3) This play has a very similar look to the last play on the top of the screen. In this case, Bohanon and Anderson have reversed roles, and the Redskins have the LB stay with the inside route (which turns into an outside route) and Geno hits Anderson with excellent timing. There are a few things to notice on this play, primarily that Geno started this motion before Anderson broke his stride, and came back to the ball. The second important aspect is Anderson coming back to the ball to put even more distance between him and the CB. The third aspect is that he times his jump well to catch this high pass naturally, and then turn around for a couple of yards after the catch. The play shows excellent timing between the QB and the WR. It’s usually hard for rookies drafted in the lower rounds or not drafted at all to develop timing with QBs because of the lack of practice hours available to them. 4) The Redskins were giving Anderson space all evening, and he takes advantage by running a comeback route again. This is an excellent play call, because there are multiple options that open up, and Geno Smith goes with the safest option with the highest possibility of yards after the catch, but it all goes for naught when Jalin Marshall drops the ball. Since we’re examining just Anderson here, he runs a good route and has separation from his man. 5) The defense is in zone coverage again, and Anderson burns them again. They have 2 safety deep look, with the CBs and LBs doing a bump and release with the receivers. Anderson’s deep speed comes into play, because once he gets past his CB, the safety can’t take much risk to the outside and over pursue because a move inside would leave him wide open for a TD. Geno and Anderson take advantage of this fear by running a deep out route and it works to perfection. Notice that Geno begins this throw before Anderson has turned outside, hitting him perfectly for a good gain. This type of play doesn’t work if say this is David Nelson running this play, because the safety would be much more aggressive in attacking this route. With speedsters like Peake and Anderson, they have to respect the deep speed and sometimes back off the pedal to avoid being exposed. 6) This is a bad play all around for the Jets. First of all, this is eerily similar to the Geno Smith interception from earlier in the game, especially since he has Jace Amaro open on both occasions right next to his passing lane. In this case, Anderson fails to sell his deep route well, and then fails to come back to the ball, allowing the CB to get his hand around him. Geno Smith is a late on this throw as well by a hairline, as he starts his throwing motion just as Anderson is making his break instead of right before. In another angle of this throw, you can clearly see Anderson leaning away with the trajectory of the ball, awaiting its arrival. These are the types of throws where the WR has to come back for the ball to help out the QB in tight spots. Someone like Brandon Marshall or Eric Decker would come back for this pass more often than not, allowing for a completion. Furthermore, the reason why Geno Smith doesn’t pick Jace Amaro for this throw is baffling. The lack of comebacks for these types of passes are very reminiscent of Stephen Hill, which may stem from the fact that most college CBs are so afraid of speed that they will give up comeback routes. 7) This is a play that comes up a couple of times during the game, and would have been a good way to combat the Redskins’ CB playing so far off the line. The Jets run a mirror route on the WR screen here with Ross and Anderson, albeit the main play is a run to Tommy Bohanon (which seems to be the “We need to run block as well, but don’t want any important RB to be injured” playcall) and therefore does not factor into the play. However, this is one of those instances where a QB can audible at the line in a real game if they see this level of space for the WR. 8) This is a huge missed play during the game. The defense is in zone coverage as well, but the Jets run a two tiered deep route tree with Williams on one end, and Anderson on the other. Anderson dips his shoulder with his CB and gets behind him, making himself wide open down the middle. However, Petty already has his mind set on Williams, and unloads a throw that just misses Williams. There are some good aspects of this throws, especially with how early Petty throws this ball relative to Williams break inside. The ball is just led a bit too much, and Williams can’t catch up with it. In retrospect, Anderson was more open and would have been the safer play here. This is also interesting to see the cat and mouse game between the defense and the offense. Remember the out route on play 5 before? Anderson had burned them with an outside route behind the CB and in front of the safety. Notice the CB on this play go outside even before Anderson makes a move, anticipating a similar route. He’s beat on this play (although his job was zone coverage) so he takes a guess based on past routes to see if he can make a great jump on the outside pass route. He guesses wrong in this case, leaving Anderson even more open. However, we usually only see plays where the CB guessed right and jumped a pass, so it’s refreshing to see them guess wrong sometimes, showing that mixing routes is paramount to success in the NFL. 9) This is a pass to Sudfeld, but Anderson runs a great route and becomes open past the first down marker. Unlike the times before, where he failed to sell the deep route, he stops on a dime here and comes back for the ball creating about 2 yards of separation between him and the CB. However, Petty decides to go with the safe option under-neath. Anderson shows very good ability to sell the route here, it just needs to be more consistent now. 10) On this play, Anderson runs a straight go route and just goes right past the CB, who wasn’t in zone coverage. He has a good 3 yards on the CB down the field, and Petty throws a good pass. It is not a “perfect pass” as the Washington announcers alluded, because Anderson has to slow down for the ball, allowing for the CB to catch him from behind. Remember play 7 from before, where the Redskins were willing to give up the short pass to Anderson? Well this is why they were willing to do so. While this does not show it (because slow motion means this file is too big) the Redskins are playing man coverage on this one. They did not want to give up an easy pass, and they paid for it with a bomb. Anderson makes a good hand catch here and holds onto the ball through contact. This play is reminiscent of a pass from Fitzpatrick to Brandon Marshall last year against the Dolphins, as in both cases the WR had created separation, but the ball held them up just enough for them to get tackled after the catch. Petty shows off a strong arm here, and good anticipation as well, just not perfect as the announcers mentioned. 11) This is a weird play, because it’s a tale of two sides. On one side, Anderson runs a horrible route here showing off some of the lack of polish. This is in slow motion to show where the issue is in his route. The play calls for a double move go route, especially after Anderson had thrived on the comeback routes earlier in the game. Anderson executes the first half of this route tree perfectly, but fails to sustain the initial move long enough to turn the hips of the CB. The CB has barely started to react when Anderson shows his hand with the double move, allowing the guy to be there step for step. In last week’s review, we saw Jalin Marshall take advantage of hip positioning a couple of times to his advantage. Anderson needs to sell the first part of this route better, by moving inside with the double move, and forcing the CB to react. You can actually see Marshall on the bottom of the screen demonstrating to an extent exactly what we’re talking about. Marshall waits until the safety or CB moves up and commits before making his second move, which opened up space for him. On the other side of the coin, Anderson makes an absolutely great catch on the pass, and scores a TD. Bryce Petty also makes a great throw under-pressure, and Anderson high points the pass to snatch it away from the defender. The throw and catch is executed beautifully here, although the initial route was not ideal. Conclusion: Robby Anderson shows very good potential, and much like Charone Peake offers a rare speed/size combination (although in Anderson’s case, it’s more of a speed/length combination) that can over-power defenses. However, Anderson is not completely polished when it comes to his route tree, and this causes a lack of separation at times. Anderson came into Week 2 of the preseason on the outside of the roster bubble, but his potential may be too enticing for the Jets to pass up at this point. It will be interesting to see how the Jets handle their wide receiver depth going forward in camp. Please discuss this story and other Jets related topics on our forum (Click Here) Week 1 Weapons Check Articles: Charone Peake (Click Here), Darron Lee (Click Here), and Jalin Marshall (Click Here) Forum Question(s) On the depth chart, where do you place Robby Anderson? Who (if any) did he leap over with his performance this week? Who player does he remind you of with his playing style? Click here to read the full story...
  6. By Glenn Naughton Just two games in to the exhibition season, Todd Bowles’ defense has looked nothing like the Jets and their fans expect as the 2016 season approaches. In two games, the Jets have surrendered 741 yards of total offense, 197 of which has come on the ground. Second-year linebacker Lorenzo Mauldin has whiffed on some tackles in the backfield that have led to big runs, apparently leading some to call his play in to question early on, and it appears Mauldin is listening and took to his official twitter account to respond. A pass-rush specialist last season, Mauldin added ten pounds of muscle this off-season to better prepare himself to be an every-down linebacker in the Jets’ attacking defensive scheme. Two pre-season games is hardly enough to pass judgement on a player, especially with the lack of tackling allowed in practice under the current CBA, but Mauldin clearly feels as if he’s under the microscope already. Mauldin’s personal story is easily one of the single-greatest examples in perseverance under less than ideal circumstances in the NFL, but that doesn’t mean every hiccup won’t be over-analyzed by Jets scribes along the way. Click here to read the full story...
  7. The Jets had a few players sustain injuries in the loss against the Washington Redskins. Todd Bowles gave a few updates on the inured players and where they stand right now. Erin Henderson… He had a stinger. He’s doing better. He’ll probably be “probable” this week if I was a betting man. Knowing him, he’ll want to play. Will Matt Forté play against the Giants? If he gets better during the week, we’ll try to anticipate it in warmups. I’d like to get him a few snaps in if I can. On if there’s any hope of Breno Giacomini practicing this week… No, he’s getting better but not this week. On if he is still hopeful Giacomini will be ready for the start of the season… Yes. On if he expects Muhammad Wilkerson to play against the Giants… We have to see how his practice goes as well, him and Forté. You have to see how the practice goes and how they’re feeling that day. They’re just coming off injury. They practiced last week pretty good and I want to hold the progress as to force them into one game. On the severity of Lawrence Thomas’ shoulder… It shouldn’t be too bad. He should be back next week. Quincy Enunwa… He’s getting a little better but he’s still going through it. We’ll have more information tomorrow. On if he’s more inclined this week to give the backup running backs playing time… We’ll see how Matt’s (Forté) feeling. If Matt is feeling okay, I’d like to get him some reps in there. Then we have Bilal (Powell), and then we’ll see what the second half looks like. The new running backs just came in, Tommy (Bohanon) had a better grasp of the system. It wouldn’t be fair to put those guys in there if they only knew two or three plays. With another week of practice, hopefully we can get some of those guys in there. Our forums have another thread with additional information about NY Jets Injury Updates. Click here to read the full story...
  8. In any other sport when I watch during pre-season I never go “crazy”, but when it comes to football I always have to catch myself before I start screaming at the TV. I wonder why that is? After watching the game again there’s a ton to clean up. Bowles is probably going to turn the heat up this week in practice: Special Teams – So far so good with Lachlan Edwards and the punt coverage. Every punt had good distance, hang time and “flipped” the field. – Unfortunately we had nothing in the return game due to touchbacks and good WAS coverage. – Ross Martin may be a good kicker in the future but he’s not ready yet. Defense – The “whiffs” and missed tackles need to start decreasing. They’ve led to big gains and extended drives. – Third down efficiency has to increase, too many third and longs are being converted. – It’s good that the defense is “bending” and not giving up points. But I’m tired of seeing the opponent march down the field for 7-8 minutes at a time. – Bad games from Marcus Williams and Erin Henderson. Williams was soft in coverage giving up completions and Henderson vacated his lane a few times allowing a couple of big runs. – Jordan Jenkins had a rookie up & down game. He had two QB hits (which were almost sacks) but he badly whiffed on a clean sack of McCoy. – Lorenzo Mauldin needs to get better cleats or improve his balance. Because multiple times he was closing in on the QB off the edge and he ended up on the ground. He also lost containment on a couple of runs. – Good games from Rontez Miles & Ronald Martin. Both patrolled the middle of the field and made multiple tackles at the line of scrimmage. In addition Martin showed good range knocking passes away on sideline patterns. – Even though Juston Burris gave up two TD’s (which he had good coverage on) he had some impressive PBU’s. – Is Leonard Williams going to average a sack a game for the year? – Solid games from Deon Simon and Mike Catapano particularly killing WAS running attack. Offense – Horrible drops which led to multiple three and outs and prevented the offense from developing any kind of flow. – Zach Sudfeld made a nice TD catch, other than that the TE’s were awful in their ball security. Kellen Davis and Sudfeld have no excuse for allowing DB’s to knock the ball out. And Jace Amaro had multiple brutal drops that killed drives. – When Bilal Powell was at RB the running game looked good. When Tommy Bohanon and Julian Howsare took over our running game disappeared, enough said. – Considering Mangold sat out the OLine was solid. Ben Ijalana & Brent Qvale alternated at RT and both were not noticeable (which is what you want). – Jalin Marshall had a down game with multiple drops, he needs to bounce back next week. – Charone Peake also had a couple of drops but fought through and made some plays. – Robby Anderson was the big standout and it was good to see him high point the ball and take it away from CB’s. Has he moved up in the WR pecking order? – Shocked at how poorly Geno Smith performed. Playing against #2’s you can’t be inaccurate and short hopping balls. In my eyes the #2 spot is now up for grabs between him and Bryce Petty. – Petty had a good game and continues to grow. He showed good mobility in the pocket and was able to make plays when the protection broke down. Click here to read the full story...
  9. By Glenn Naughton It’s a good thing pre-season football games mean so little in terms of the final score, otherwise last night’s Jets loss to the Washington Redskins would’ve been a heartbreaker. A 22-18 final score in which Gang Green allowed the winning touchdown pass from rookie quarterback Nate Sudfeld to fellow-rookie, wide receiver Kendal Thompson with just :29 seconds remaining. Sloppy tackling and all-around poor pass defense made it a tough one to watch as the Redskins won the time of possession battle 35:50 to 24:10, while their back-up quarterback, Colt McCoy completed 13 of 16 passes to go along with 2 touchdowns and an interception. It wasn’t all bad for Gang Green though, as second-year quarterback Bryce Petty saw extensive playing time and appears to be pushing incumbent back-up Geno Smith for the number two job. Petty completed 61% of his passes, going 16-26 with a pair of scoring strikes without a turnover. He looked confident and poised in the pocket, making quick decisions and putting the ball on target. We also saw Petty keep his eyes down field while scrambling away from pressure and throwing on the run. The biggest beneficiary from Petty’s big night was undrafted rookie wide receiver Robby Anderson out of Temple. Anderson had a big night, topping 100 yards and pulling in a 44-yard TD. Anderson finished the evening with 6 catches for 131 yards and a touchdown that came on a 42 yard toss that saw the 6′ 3” receiver display excellent hands and timing as he elevated over a Washington defender to pluck Petty’s pass out of the air and take it the final 15 yard to paydirt. Smith meanwhile, may be watching his roster spot slip away as he not only failed to lead the Jets on a scoring drive but threw a mind-numbing interception into triple coverage that led Redskins broadcaster and former quarterback Joe Theismann to comment, saying it’s the type of throw you see in a film session and have to ask “what did you see that caused you to throw the ball out there”? Speaking with ESPN radio after the game, Smith displayed confidence, appearing to know what he had to do to fix the poor decisions while focusing on next week’s game against the Giants. “Interceptions are part of the game. Obviously something I gotta’ clean up but it’s an easy fix. I have to not make that throw, not try to make a hero throw and just take what they give me on that play”. When asked about their match-up with their MetLife Stadium co-tenants Smith commented, “Yeah, that’s the Snoopy Bowl so that’s always a big one for us. We always look forward to it. We have a week of practice ahead of us so we have a game plan and we have to hone in on those guys and get ready and be sharp”. Despite struggling under center, Geno Smith remains positive heading in to next weeks game against the Giants. Even with what was a largely lackluster effort on defense, another bright spot, for the second week in a row, was defensive lineman Leonard Williams who had his second sack in as many games, appearing to effortlessly blow past the interior offensive line before plowing over the running back Chris Thompson en route to McCoy. Rookie punter Lac Edwards also continued to show he belongs, booming a long punt of 55 yards and averaging just over 46.2 yards per attempt on six tries. Center Nick Mangold was given the day off by head coach Todd Bowles, and rookie quarterback Christian Hackenberg didn’t see any action for what Bowles simply call “the coach’s decision”. Click here to read the full story...
  10. By Glenn Naughton With the Jets getting set to kick off their second pre-season contest, a road game against the Washington Redskins, we take a look at a few players worth watching early on, and when the starters have exited and battles for roster spots are playing out on the field. Generally these can be broken down to individual performers, but with it being the pre-season, there are plenty of battles at specific position groups, so we’ll start with a couple of those. Quarterbacks Bryce Petty, Geno Smith and Christian Hackenberg- Head Coach Todd Bowles said early in camp that the number two QB job was “up in the air” but has since backed off of those comments, suggesting otherwise. However, the Jets are clearly in full evaluation mode of Petty as he got the lions share of snaps as the number two this week. Even if it’s not their intention to have Smith and Petty battle it out for the number two job, should Petty out-perform Smith, is it something they’d be willing to turn a blind eye to? For Smith, this could be a chance for him to clear his head without having to hear boo’s raining down on him before even taking a single snap. He’s boycotted the media since facing off against Jacksonville on Thursday after ducking post-game interviews, chalking it up to being “focused”. Just how much that focus pays off will be determined tonight against Washington. It should be interesting to see if Gang Green trots Petty out with the 2’s or the 3’s and 4’s as the did last week, or if he’ll be flipped with Smith. Could any other fan base possibly be looking more forward to the pre-season debut of their 4th string QB than Jets fans? Highly unlikely, but it’s not without good reason. While plenty of attention will be paid to Petty and Smith, hopes will likely be highest for Hackenberg as the team gets its first look at this year’s second-round draft choice, who they’re hoping is the answer to their decades-long search for a franchise QB. Hackenberg has seen increased reps in recent days and made some very good throws at practice on Wednesday. Don’t be surprised to see Christian Hackenberg trying to find Robby Anderson should he make is pro debut tonight. The Young Wideouts- Jalin Marshall, Charone Peake, and Robby Anderson headline a group of playmaking rookie receivers who are generating plenty of buzz at Jets camp. Marshall for the fact that he finds ways to get open on a consistent basis, while Peake and Anderson continue to utilize their height (6’ 2’’ and 6’ 3’’ respectively) and sub 4.4 speed to stand out. Peake was the best of the group in the team’s pre-season win against the Jaguars as he led the team with 4 catches, one of which showed great awareness and body control as he kept his feet in bounds while falling to the ground and hauling in a touchdown pass. Anderson didn’t show much in terms of numbers, but he narrowly missed making an impressive touchdown grab from Petty on the corner of the end zone. This week in practice, Anderson also made a eye-popping, one-handed grab on a pass from Petty that appeared to be good for a big gain before being called out of bounds by an official. With more reps in practice this week, Hackenberg seemed to have solid chemistry with Anderson and threw his way several times. Should he get the opportunity, look for Hackenberg to try to find Anderson a time or two. OT Ryan Clady- One of the off-season’s most important acquisitions as D’Brickashaw Ferguson’s replacement at left tackle, Clady is still trying to get the rust off after missing all of last season. He was beaten by rookie defensive lineman Yannick Ngakoue on a sack of Ryan Fitzpatrick which should be taken with a grain of salt at this point, but fans should be watching to see if it becomes a regular thing for the former Pro-Bowler. S Dion Bailey- Bailey was up and down at Jets practice this week after saying he felt he wasn’t being given a chance at one point. Head coach Todd Bowles was asked about Bailey’s comments but didn’t seem too concerned. The following day, Bailey had a pair of passes defended to go along with an interception of Bryce Petty to close the session out. Bailey, it appears, is doing all he can to prove he belongs on one of the most talented defensive backfield’s in the NFL. OG Craig Watts- A former San Diego Charger, Watts held his own last week against the Jaguars back-ups while Brian Winters was pushed around a little bit in the passing game early on. Given Winters’ experience and knowledge of the system, he may be difficult to unseat, but Watts is a mauler in the run game who may push Winters. Watts may also get a look at right tackle at some point if Brent Qvale or Ben Ijalana don’t step up and seize the opportunity in front of them with starter Breno Giacomini on the shelf. Inside Linebackers Erin Henderson, Bruce Carter and Darron Lee- Henderson, the projected opening day starter, had a rough day at the office against Jacksonville. A pair of missed tackles and being run over by Chris Ivory got him plenty of attention from onlookers for all the wrong reasons. As the team’s first-round draft choice, some fans may be tempted to ask for more of Darron Lee, but head coach Todd Bowles is more likely to use him as a chess piece in a variety of roles, for the time being, anyway. Then there’s Carter who has appeared in 63 career games (35 starts), picking up close to 300 tackles to go along with 5 sacks and 5 interceptions. Even with Henderson likely to retain the starting job, depth at linebacker appears to be the best it’s been in years. That alone is reason to keep an eye on what the Jets have behind the starters in the middle. TE/H-Back Jace Amaro- Amaro might be a tight end or H-back on paper, but his off-season weight loss combined with the team lining him up in the slot and on the outside against Jacksonville suggests they may have other plans for the third-year pro. If not for a pair of errant passes from Geno Smith and Bryce Petty last week, Amaro could have had a nice game for himself as he managed to get plenty of separation from linebackers and defensive backs, but nobody was able to hit the 6’ 5’’ pass catcher. Kickoff is set for 7:30 tonight between the Jets and ‘Skins. Be sure to log in to our forums to talk about all the action. Click here to read the full story...
  11. We continue along with our series of film breakdowns from the preseason, with rookie wide receiver Charone Peake out Clemson University. Peake displays an excellent size/speed combination, and he was a much heralded prospect coming out of high school. Injuries sidelined him in college, but he has very good potential, and was considered a steal by the Jets in the draft. Let’s see how he did in his first preseason game against the Jacksonville Jaguars. 1) The first play here is also the first catch of the preseason. He lines up outside on the left side of the formation, facing man coverage. The first thing you notice is the space that he is allowed to have in man coverage. Notice the coverage up top (on whom I believe is Bilal Powell, but I can’t confirm) and how close his defender is to the player. Notice the extra 2 yards of so afforded to Peake, which is a sign of respect for his speed as well as his size. This is a pretty easy route because the defender is trying to run with him, instead of backpedaling until Peake is near him. There has been a lot of mention about Dee Milliner on this subject, because Alabama doesn’t like the CB to backpedal quite as much. In this slow motion, you can see why this is a problem in the NFL with quicker players, because when Peake makes his stop, the CB is facing the other way with his hip turned, thus has to do a 180 degree turn to come back for the ball. Notice the coverage on Powell, the defender is jamming him from the line, at which point he can run stride for stride. However, this is dangerous with speed guys that have size (because the catching radius is higher, the angle of the throw would be different than just pure speed guys) and causes the defense to play conservatively on this play. Not to evoke nightmares, but Sammy Watkins ran very similar routes last year in the last game, albeit he is much more talented and against a great CB. Peake executes this play well, and Geno Smith throws the ball on the money. In Jalin Marshall’s films, there is clear evidence of an innate ability to make the first defender miss, however Peake possesses no such skill at this point. He gets tackled short of the first down, and eventually the Jets punt after failing to convert. Why the officials picked up the personal foul on Jack is befuddling, as Peake was targeted with a diving tackle as he was wrapped up and down. 2) This is the TD caught by Peake from the side angle. At the onset of this play, Geno and Peake realize that he is matched up one on one with the CB, and they combine for a back shoulder pass. Peake does a good job using his body to shield the defender away from the ball, although he could have done a better job at trying to catching the ball with his hands, instead of relying on a body catch for the most part, allowing the defender extra time to put his arm in the way. Peake does an amazing job keeping his feet in the end zone as he’s securing the catch. This is also very good concentration to make this catch with the defender draped all over him. The CB does have his hand on the jersey of Peake as he’s trying to get the ball, so there could have been a case made for pass interference on this play. Great throw and catch on this play. 3) During his college days, Peake showed a lackadaisical approach to run blocking. There were times where he would destroy his assignment, and times where he looked like he just wanted to avoid contact. It could have been one of the reasons why he slid in the draft, because of a perceived lack of physicality when it came to blocking at times. This play is an example of him engaging his assignment and blocking him out of the play. It’s not a highlight film block, but he accomplishes the goal. 4) Peake is not the target on this play, but he wins his individual match up for a slant route in this case. He is matched up one on one in man coverage with the CB, stutter steps out of the stance, and beats him inside. While he doesn’t break his ankle, there is about a yard to two yard cushion between him and the defender. If this was a quick pass to Peake, it should have been successful (albeit, they got a larger play out of this) and shows how dangerous Peake can be as a one on one match up. The Jets for years lacked one on one weapons, because players didn’t have the physical ability to beat their man, allowing defenses to be more aggressive in the running game, or taking more chances with defenders. Going back to the first play, if a defense had no respect for the WR’s deep speed, they would play bump and run, at which point, a comeback route is much harder to accomplish. Mike Maccagnan has done an exceptional job with filling the roster with players that are a nightmare to defend one on one, forcing defenses to commit to certain types of plays before the snap. 5) This is another play where Peake wasn’t involved, but he creates very good separation from his defender in an one on one match up. The call seems to be a screen play on this play, but the hot read in this case is Jeremy Ross, but the timing is off with the route, and Geno improvises to try and complete the screen pass to Amaro. If the play is completed, it would be a good pass, but under pressure, the pass is under-thrown. Peake is on the left side of the play in the slot matched up with an OLB. He runs right at the LB, and then leaves him in the dust on the quick out route. If the play was designed to go to the left side, this is an easy completion for a first down, if not more. Notice that right before he heads outside, Peake fakes out the LB as if he was going inside, forcing the guy to take a step back, creating even more separation, showing off a good route running skill. 6) This is almost a carbon copy of the first play, only on a larger scale. First of all, notice the spacing at the start of the play, which again shows respect for his speed and size. If you look on the other end, you’ll see the defender is much closer to the receiver again. Furthermore, the defender also starts running with his hips turned to Peake, which allows this to be a high percentage completion. Petty makes a good throw, and Peake runs a good comeback route, and makes a good catch. Peake gains roughly six yards after contact as well. As mentioned in the Jalin Marshall article, the unsung hero in this play is the running back, who makes a great diving block to protect Petty. This is another reason why teams always tend to buy into size/speed combinations in the draft, because just the mere threat alters a defense. In this game, we see two clear situations where the defense was all but willing to give up easy completions because they were worried about deep speed. Teams will of course try to jam Peake at the line more in the future, at which point he would have to prove that he could beat the jam and get off the line. 7) On this punt, Peake is the right side gunner. He does a good job getting around the defenders and getting downfield, and ends up paying for it by getting hit. It begs the question if this is an illegal hit, because it happened well after the catcher had signaled a fair catch. Regardless, Peake does a good job with his assignment in getting down the field, albeit the angle may not have the greatest for a tackle. It also bears to mention that this gunner position was held by Quincy Enunwa earlier in the game. 8) For all the good Peake did on the last punt, he absolutely gets taken out of this play. Peake is pushed a good 4 yards out of bounds on this play, and completely taken out of it. Peake was not a standout on special teams in college (and he missed chunks of time with various injuries) so it’s expected that he would be rusty with a position he’s not all that familiar with. However, he plays right into the punt receiving team’s plan here by being forced so far out of the play. It’ll be interesting to see if he remains a gunner on the team with Enunwa’s emerging importance on the team. Conclusion: Charone Peake certainly flashed during workouts, and he showed off his skills in the first game. The Jaguars showed a lot of respect for his speed, and Peake made them pay with good route running. Peake showed off impressive ability in running slants, outs, comebacks, and back shoulder passes. Barring injury, he should be guaranteed to make the team. The team is filled with exciting weapons for the first time in a long time. The defensive depth chart is ridiculous when compared to past depth charts. Brandon Marshall, Eric Decker, Quincy Enunwa, Charone Peake, Jalin Marshall (along with Devin Smith) might be one of the most talented groups in the league. Please discuss this article and others on our forums, here Also, please check out our previous Weapons Check series with Jalin Marshall (here) and Darron Lee (here) Click here to read the full story...
  12. By Glenn Naughton Another day of training camp in Florham Park for the New York Jets, and another day filled with outstanding catches from several young receivers which has been the case from the outset for Gang Green. No matter which Jets signal caller was under center today, very few passes hit the turf and some highlight reel grabs drew resounding applause from onlookers. First up was Jalin Marshall who continues to make play after play, on a go route down the right sideline during one-on-one drills when Bryce Petty lofted up a deep ball. Initially it looked like the pass would be overthrown, then it looked like Marshall may have a chance, before he reached out with his right hand to pluck the pass out of the air and pull it in to his body. It went unnoticed by some onlookers as it happened while many fans were focused on Matt Forte and the running backs, but it was easily the best catch of the day. Rookie receiver Jalin Marshall continues to impress at Jets camp. Later on it was another undrafted rookie free agent in Temple’s Robbie Anderson who was on the receiving end of a Christian Hackenberg bomb down the left sideline. A questionable call from the camp official saying Anderson was out-of-bounds nullified the play but the call was borderline. Either way, coming up with a spectacular one-handed grab of his own drew cheers from fans stationed in the tents behind the media along that same sideline. Finally, the forgotten man in the receiver competition, Kenbrell Thompkins, ran a shallow comeback route along the right sideline where Ryan Ftizpatrick unleashed a pass that was wide to Thompkins’ left. He quickly left his feet and went horizontal, hauling in a diving grab for yet another eye-popping catch. Matt Forte made his camp debut on Wednesday. While there weren’t any acrobatic grabs out of the running backs on Wednesday, that doesn’t mean there wasn’t any buzz surrounding the position. The debut of former Chicago Bears running back Matt Forte created a stir as he graduated from positional drills each of the past two days, to getting reps during the team period today. It didn’t take long before fans got a glimpse at what Forte can offer as he pulled down passes out of the backfield as well as a solid grab over the middle when split out as a receiver. Forte should be exactly what the Jets are looking for in an experienced check-down option. It wasn’t just the offense that had noteworthy performances either, as Darron Lee was all over the field once again, breaking up a Fitzpatrick pass down the middle of the field and coming up with a tackle on a screen pass that he identified immediately. Safety Ronald Martin also had a pair of interceptions after dropping one from Geno Smith in the end zone yesterday. Rookie quarterback Christian Hackenberg saw increased reps for the second day in a row, leading to speculation he’ll make his debut against the Redskins on Friday night. When asked about the probability of the Penn State product getting some reps under center, Head Coach Todd Bowles said “That’s the plan. We’ll see how it works out”. Click here to read the full story...
  13. On this week’s episode of JetNation Radio Joe is joined by JetNation writer Glenn Naughton and they have a lot to talk about! First we have an actual game to discuss, what did we think of the first team offense and defense? Did any of the reserve players or rookie really stand out? Then on to #JetsCamp, who has been standing out in training camp the last couple of days as both Joe and Glenn were there multiple days. They will cover topics such as who are some guys who are on the roster bubble? What veterans are playing for their jobs in preseason? Tune in and listen to the latest updates on our New York Jets Podcast. Click here to read the full story...
  14. By Glenn Naughton The weather let up just a bit yesterday at Florham Park as the Jets came out for their penultimate practice leading up to their second pre-season game on the road against the Washington Redskins this Friday night. Perhaps the most surprising aspect of the session came in that quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick was not only perfect in the early going, completing all of his passes through the first set of team drills (10-10 by my count), but that once Fitzpatrick started to misfire it came on a pair of long balls down the field that had a bit too much juice. His first incomplete pass came on a go route to wide receiver Eric Decker who was roughly 60 yards down the field with a step on his man, Fitzpatrick’s pass fell to the ground, overthrown by several yards. Just a few plays later it was to the opposite side of the field, on what would have been a 40(ish) yard completion, Fitzpatrick again overthrew his targeted receiver by several yards. All in all, it was a good day for Fitzpatrick who threw several TD’s to just one interception during team periods when linebacker Erin Henderson picked him off along the right sideline. While Fitzpatrick had a strong showing, the same couldn’t be said for Geno Smith who benefited from a pair of dropped interceptions (Ronald Martin and Rontez Miles) but still mishandled a pair of snaps and was reportedly seen slamming his helmet to the turf in frustration. Then of course there was Bryce Petty who once again got the majority of second-team snaps as the team continues to evaluate the Baylor product who is either fighting for roster spot, or the back up job, depending on who you’re listening to nowadays. In non-quarterback news, Muhammad Wilkerson was back and on the field on a limited basis while running back Matt Forte worked out during positional drills for the second day in a row but didn’t see any work during team periods. Given Forte’s extensive pro resume, it’s clear that the Jets are happy to let him rest his balky hamstring as much as possible rather than run the risk of doing further damage as the season approaches. Mike Catapano also flashed some of the pass rush ability we saw from him in limited action last year as he was able to come around the edge and pressure the passer on multiple plays. Brandon Shell was also getting another look at left tackle as he did in the pre-season opener against Jacksonville but this could simply be a case of plugging in a body in a spot where one is needed. Shell is largely viewed as a future prospect at right tackle or along the interior of the O-line moving forward. The team will conduct their final practice before facing the Redskins this afternoon at Florham Park. Click here to read the full story...
  15. Our second film breakdown of the Weapons Check series deals with rookie linebacker Darron Lee, out of Ohio State University. Lee, played mostly with the second unit, but did make his presence known during the game. Since defense is more reactive, it’s hard to grade Lee’s performance on a preset rating scale, similar to the ones dealing with players on offense. We’ll break down some plays, and see how Lee is adjusting. Unfortunately, preseason games aren’t privy to coaches camera, therefore these film breakdowns are not comprehensive by any means. 1) The first play we analyze is a group tackle by the Jets. Darron Lee doesn’t seem to get official credit for this tackle, but he’s a big reason the runner was stopped. Lee displays his biggest advantage on this play, which is speed. He beats the guard to the outside, preventing the offensive lineman from gaining leverage on this play. If Lee is slower, then this play works much better because the offensive lineman would be right in the path of Lee, but the speed helps him evade the block. Lee also shows great closing speed on this play, which is something that stands out with him on tape from college. While it is not a display of extreme athleticism, it is definitely good to see the extra burst from the linebackers on defense. While he doesn’t get much credit on the play, it looks like Lee makes the biggest impact on this stop. 2) This is not a successful play for Lee, nor the Jets. The reason this play is here has nothing to do with the run either. What is important about this play happens right before the running back takes the ball to his left. The Jets run a double A gap blitz through the same gap, banking on the first defender to create spacing for the second blitzing player coming behind him. From a defensive standpoint, think of the first blitz-er acting almost as an offensive lineman as the worst case scenario, trying to open up the hole for the runner behind him. The Jets run this blitz to perfection here, as Lee has a direct path to the RB (and if it was a passing play, then the QB) but the RB makes a quick cut that gives him some space. Remember, this is the second string unit, so it does not have stalwarts such as Mo Wilkerson, Leonard Williams, or Sheldon Richardson. The right side of the defensive line gets pushed back, creating an escape route for the RB. Lee doesn’t do anything else on the play, but the execution of the blitz was very good. 3) Statistically, this is probably the best play of Darron Lee’s night. Subjectively, it’s probably one of his worst plays of the night. Remember the last A-gap blitz on the previous play, well it’s very much the same concept, but a C-gap blitz on this play. On this play, the lead blitz player acts the same as before and takes out a blocker with Lee tasked to follow him. However, the guard for the Jaguars recognizes this blitz pattern, and hands over his responsibility to the center, and then engages Lee, stopping him in his tracks. Lee isn’t going anywhere on this play, but Chad Henne gifts him a sack by essentially falling right in front of Lee. Lee does his task by falling on top of Henne, but this is not a good play by Lee. Rather, the right side of the defensive line makes great penetration into the backfield (unlike the last play), therefore flushing Henne out of the pocket on a 3rd and long. 4) The tackle on the running back might just be Lee’s best play of the night. At the onset of this play, Lee is mirroring the RB, thus it’s his responsibility to stop him. Lee absolutely annihilates the C-gap on this play, and blows up the play in the backfield. What is most impressive about this tackle? The closing speed. The RB is a about a step away from the right hash mark, and Lee is a good two yards away from him, but Lee makes the tackle before the RB has hit foot on the hash mark. Last year, this is a play where the RB absolutely makes it to the outside for a few yards. The Jags have this play set up pretty well, and if not for Lee’s tackle, they have blockers out in space for every Jet in the area, except for the single high safety. 5) There is a penalty on this play, negating this tackle. However, since it’s preseason, it’s more important to see the ability here than the result. This is a simple run to the left, with the offensive line sliding to the left. The LT is supposed to slide out, and then seal off the LB from getting to the RB. If the LT does his job, there is a decent hole for the RB to run through here, but Lee shows off his speed and beats the LT inside, blowing up the play. There was a lot of chatter about the size of Lee and how blockers will over-power him, but people are under estimating the impact of speed on the game. These blocking assignments are rooted in timing, and Lee’s speed throws off this timing. If Lee is a hair slower, the LT on this play comes around and blocks him off. There are plays were Lee will be over-powered (The sack play being an example) but his speed adds such a dimension to the defense, that it’ll disrupt the blocking schemes of an offense. 6) This is an experiment in slower GIFs to showcase Lee’s ability with more clarity. If there is a problem viewing these slower paced plays or if you feel that a regular paced play makes for better viewing, please let me know in the forums. Since defense is harder to dissect, a slower paced film helps people understand the intricacies better, in my opinion. On this play, the right side of Jacksonville’s line slides left. The left side of the offensive line blocks their man one on one. Since the right side TE and Tackle slide , this leaves the RG free to engage the LB in the open. The Jags would presume in this case, the OLB to the left has to contain the run, therefore would run to the outside lane (which he does), and ergo a huge hole should be open right up the middle. Darron Lee shows off his speed again, by simply beating the RG to the hole, robbing the guard of any leverage and stopping the play. This is another timing play that would work on slower LBs, but fails here because the offensive line’s timing is thrown off. Lee makes the tackle on this play for minimal gain. 7) The best of Lee, the worst of Lee. This is a short yard run, where the Jets crowd the line and bring their linebackers on a blitz. Lee slips through the gap, and has a clear shot at the RB, showing off his elusiveness. The Jets have single high safety with man coverage across the board, and everyone else is running towards the ball, so they sold out for the run. The RB has room to the outside on this play, and there is a decent chance he can get to the edge on this play, if Lee does not enter the vision of the RB. However, Lee’s presence forces the RB to reverse course, which makes Lee miss the tackle. However, this change in course led the RB to run right back into where the Jets had strength in numbers, so in the grand scheme of things, it was a good play. Remember at the start of the article, it was stated that it’s almost impossible to grade defensive players because it’s a reactive game? This would be a good example as to why. Lee’s main priority in this case is to either tackle the runner (in which case, he fails) or prevent him from getting outside (which could explain his over-zealousness to get ahead of the RB, and would mean a success), but it’s hard to tell without knowing the call. This is also the same on pass coverage, where a TE might run right past him on a play. This could either indicate a zone defense for the LB (in which case, fine play) or missed coverage on man defense (terrible play), thus creating a high vulnerability to assumptions when trying to grade them. 8) This play is here to just show Lee covering a TE. There aren’t many plays that show him in coverage, and the ones where he was in coverage, the route isn’t clear with the TV camera angle. This is one of the few angles on TV that showed him in coverage and he seemed to handle himself fine on this play. The TE on this play doesn’t run a complicated route, and sits down in the middle of the field as if it was zone coverage, even though the defense played man coverage. Lee doesn’t really lose separation when the TE takes a step outside, and he’s right next to him to jump the route if the pass was thrown to the TE. Conclusion: Darron Lee is not a perfect prospect by any means. Perfect prospects go in the top 5 of the draft. However, Lee is a great prospect that adds much needed speed to the defense. This breakdown shows that while there are occasions where he gets held up by stronger blockers, he can wreck havoc by disrupting the timing of blocks. Lee displays excellent closing speed, and on numerous occasions, shot through the gap before the offensive lineman was ready to block him. There are times where he will be taken out of a play because he wasn’t able to bull-rush an offensive lineman, but he makes up for those with his ability to blow up plays in the backfield. We can’t analyze his coverage skills until the season starts with the All-22 camera angles, however the scouting reports glowed about his coverage skills because he’s a converted safety. He looks like a much welcome addition to the Jets defense. Please read our report on Jalin Marshall from Preseason Game 1, here Please provide feedback on the article, and discuss this article on our forums, here. I would love to hear feedback on the slower GIFs, to see if it’s a good idea or not, moving forward. Click here to read the full story...