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  • What is your favorite Jets related memory?
    When the Jets won the Super Bowl in 2012. Oh sorry, forgot that you can't see the future.
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    No, I do everything online.
  • What Jets memory broke your heart?
    When the Jets fired Herman Edwards. He kept me busy.
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    No, I was born in 2005.
  1. Tom Shane wrote this post in our forums and I felt it was worth sharing. By T0mShane So, we’re rapidly approaching that point where Jets beat reporters are going to need to drum up interest in what will be a bad, boring team so I thought I’d save us a bunch of time by pointing out the more productive storylines for the upcoming season: 1. Will the team function differently when Woody is shipped to England? If there’s one common denominator in the Jets dysfunction over the past 15 years, it has been the presence of idiot-manboy Woody Johnson. Though not as flagrantly meddling as some league owners have been, the repetition of self-sabotage from regime to regime can only lead one to believe that Woody’s leadership (or lack thereof) is the thread that binds each failed attempt at a reset. If and when Woody is confirmed as our bumbling ambassador to England, it will be interesting to see if and how it changes the organizational dynamics and forward presentation of the New York Jets franchise. Similar to the way the Yankees laid the foundation for success when George Steinbrenner was exiled from Major League Baseball for two years (allowing the adults in the organization to clean up his mess), there’s a similar chance for Mike Maccagnan to right the ship, or further sink it. Which brings us to… 2. Does a Maccagnan v Bowles civil war break out over the QB position? With Woody potentially out of the way, it will be interesting to watch which one of Bowles or Maccagnan elevates himself to take control of the team. Ask yourself, who runs the Jets right now? Who’s in charge? The fact that it’s impossible to say who actually calls the shots with the Jets franchise is indicative of the greater institutional problem inherent to Woody Johnson’s ownership–a frayed and convoluted chain of command wherein nobody and everybody is responsible for everything and nothing. It’s this vacuum that helped career weasels like Rex Ryan and Mike Tannenbaum remain employed far longer than their resumes should have allowed, but it’s also repeatedly made it difficult to assess accountability when the team inevitably nosedives, which is why the same mistakes in hiring keep happening. You get Idzik because Woody never knew what Tannenbaum did incorrectly, and you get Maccagnan because Woody never knew what it was that Idzik screwed up. Similarly, you get Bowles, and Rex, and Mangini, and the next coach, because the roles of coach and GM overlap far too much with the Jets, so it’s never clear who to blame for what. Is the GM under performing because the coach sucks and can’t develop talent? Or are the coach’s hands tied because the GM forced Sanchez and/or Hackenberg on them? As it relates to the current group, what happens if and when Todd Bowles insists on starting Josh McCown for weeks on end in the same way that he started Ryan Fitzpatrick for weeks on end? And when that results in yet another lost year, does Maccagnan feel pressure to intervene? It’s hard to imagine both men keeping their jobs if (as most predict) we end up slogging through another sub-6-win campaign. It’s in Maccagnan’s interest to have Hackenberg and the young players on the roster play significant snaps and show improvement, even in a bad year. But it’s in Bowles’ sole interest to win at all costs, try to get to eight wins, and save some face. Bowles would be wise to note that the last four guys to have his job are all out of the league right now. He, and Maccagnan, need to start thinking about how much they want to avoid selling insurance for a living. 3. Are Josh Allen, Sam Darnold, Josh Rosen, Luke Falk, etc. any good? Every year it’s presumed the next QB crop will be good and every year the Jets get a high draft pick, the QB crop is always trash. Well, here we are again, so it’s time to set the DVR to record some PAC-12 and Mountain West games. That is, unless you believe that the Jets have their QB of the future on their roster right now, which likely means that a “pragmatist’s guide” isn’t really for you. 4. What assets can you sell to a new coach in 2018? In the event that Bowles is fired, what marketable pieces can we sell to a new coaching prospect next year? Right now, you’d lead with a top seven pick(!), lots of cap space(!), and that’s it. Unless Ardarius Stewart wildly over performs, or Hackenberg rises from the dead, it’s not a particularly appealing job to walk into, especially when you consider how poorly run the team has been for decades. As to the cap space, the good news is that we’ll have around $50 million dollars in space. The bad news is that 20 other teams will have over $25 mil in cap space. Currently, the Jets roster lacks a quarterback, pass rushers, cornerbacks, a left tackle, and viable threats at WR. Unfortunately, those five positions are coincidentally the five most expensive positions in all of football, so even having $50 mil at your disposal is relatively meaningless. It’ll buy you a shot at Kirk Cousins and Trumaine Johnson, with an outside shot at Nate Solder (if you’re willing to go into debt). So how can the Jets franchise market itself to a viable head coach? Complete control, a safety, and Ardarius Stewart? 5. Darron Lee, Ardarius Stewart, Quincy Enunwa, Jamal Adams, and Leonard Williams vs. Mo Wilkerson, Sheldon Richardson, Calvin Pryor, and Eric Decker for the soul of the team The locker room was a burning sh*t-vessel where numerous rats could be seen jumping off the starboard side long before the season was over, and Maccagnan wisely went out of his way to change course this season by dumping poisonous veterans and importing <puke> “character guys” who seem to want to play football for a living. As foolish as it was for Bowles to hand the locker room over to guys like Brandon Marshall, Decker, and Revis, it remains to be seen how much doing so has compromised his standing among the players moving forward. As we’ve seen repeatedly in sports, it’s extremely difficult for a coach to survive once he’s lost a locker room, which Bowles clearly did last year. Rehabilitating his career will require a bit of amnesia amongst some players from last year, and a whole lot of unnatural influence coming from the rookies they just brought in. This element will become pretty evident once camp starts. The beat guys are going to look to goad guys like Sheldon and Wilkerson over their crap play last year, and Decker will be pummeled with Fitzpatrick and Brandon Marshall questions. Sheldon has already shown he’s dumb enough to take the bait. What remains to be seen is how guys like Adams, Lee, and Williams respond to the more established young veterans getting smacked around publicly in what will be a confrontational environment. For most of these players, it’ll be the first time in their lives that the fans and the media will be openly mocking them, and it’s going to be a culture shock. It’s hard to imagine Bowles guiding them through (and above) it, and it’s equally difficult to imagine Mo or Sheldon imparting any words of team-first wisdom that they’ll find helpful. The question is, is this next generation of player mentally tough enough to endure what they’re about to face, or does Manish get the best of them? Be sure to stop by our forums and tell us what you think, we want to hear from you. Visit this thread; A Pragmatist’s Guide to Watching the 2017 Jets Season. Click here to read the full story...
  2. On May 26, 2017, the New York Jets announced the signing of Collette Smith as an intern to work with the defensive backs. This signing marks the first time the Jets have hired a female coach and Smith becomes the third female coach in NFL history. The first being Jen Welter, who the Cardinals hired as an intern during training camp and the second was Kathryn Smith, whom the Bills retained full-time as a quality control/special teams coach. Smith is a former coach and player for the New York Sharks of Independent Women’s Football League and grew up a Jets fan, making this all the more exciting. This signing, and the past signings of Jen Welter and Kathryn Smith, could be the start of a trend of hiring more women in the NFL in prominent coaching roles. Collette Smith is quoted saying, “One day a woman will come to a football team, and it won’t be a big story. It’ll just be football. When that day comes I’ll be more honored and even more proud.” Click here to read the full story...
  3. The New York Jets began organized team activities this week, which included its fair share of interesting news. The Quarterback Competition http://www.newyorkjets.com/news/article-7/QBs-Take-Their-Competition-into-First-OTA/75111788-6c4e-4892-8548-ba22e7cef35d?campaign=tw In my opinion, OTAs don’t really mean much in terms of competition, but if Hackenberg or Petty want to beat out McCown for the starting gig, they needed to show at least SOMETHING this week. Prediction: McCown starts week 1; Hackenberg takes over week 5 @ CLE Rookie Contracts Most of our rookies are now under contract, with the exception of 1st round pick, Jamal Adams. All the deals are the standard 4 year rookie contracts. This weeks signings include: ArDarius Stewart (WR) Tough break for Brisly Estime, WR/KR/PR from Syracuse University. He had a decent chance to make this team as a return man considering we lacked excitement at the position. Unfortunately, a torn achilles’ tendon will put an end to his hopes for this season. Following Estime’s injury, the Jets announced the signing of DB Corey White, who recorded 30 tackles and 2 interceptions with the Buffalo Bills last year. Training camp begins in Mid-July. Let’s get excited! Go Jets! Click here to read the full story...
  4. The New York Jets began organized team activities this week, which included its fair share of interesting news. The Quarterback Competition http://www.newyorkjets.com/news/article-7/QBs-Take-Their-Competition-into-First-OTA/75111788-6c4e-4892-8548-ba22e7cef35d?campaign=tw In my opinion, OTAs don’t really mean much in terms of competition, but if Hackenberg or Petty want to beat out McCown for the starting gig, they needed to show at least SOMETHING this week. Prediction: McCown starts week 1; Hackenberg takes over week 5 @ CLE Rookie Contracts Most of our rookies are now under contract, with the exception of 1st round pick, Jamal Adams. All the deals are the standard 4 year rookie contracts. This weeks signings include: ArDarius Stewart (WR) Tough break for Brisly Estime, WR/KR/PR from Syracuse University. He had a decent chance to make this team as a return man considering we lacked excitement at the position. Unfortunately, a torn achilles’ tendon will put an end to his hopes for this season. Following Estime’s injury, the Jets announced the signing of DB Corey White, who recorded 30 tackles and 2 interceptions with the Buffalo Bills last year. Training camp begins in Mid-July. Let’s get excited! Go Jets! Click here to read the full story...
  5. By Glenn Naughton The Jets announced the signing of free agent defensive back Corey White, formerly of the New Orleans Saints, Dallas Cowboys, Arizona Cardinals and most recently, the Buffalo Bills. New York will be White’s fifth team in six seasons. Since entering the league in 2012, White has started 24 contests, racking up 133 tackles, six interceptions, two forced fumbles and two fumble recoveries. White was added when the Jets saw their first major injury to one of their young training camp hopefuls when rookie return man Brisly Estime suffered a torn ACL, knocking him out for the season. Click here to read the full story...
  6. By Glenn Naughton Just a two weeks after hosting free agent running back Stevan Ridley, the Jets have reportedly met with another familiar face. Ian Rapoport is reporting that the Jets have hosted one of their former receivers in Kenbrell Thompkins who has not played a down in the NFL since the team’s week 17 loss at Buffalo two years ago. Having recently placed wide receiver Devin Smith on injured reserve after waiving him, the team is apparently keeping all options open to fill out their roster with training camp just a couple of months away. Click here to read the full story...
  7. Did Mike Maccagnan wait too long to snag a cornerback? Just a few short seasons ago, the New York Jets entered the 2014 NFL draft with little to no talent at several positions, but few came close to the lack of play-makers the team had at the wide receiver position. With one of the deepest receiver classes in NFL history, it seemed Gang Green had finally caught a break. A dire need that could easily be filled with the likes of Brandin Cooks, Kelvin Benjamin, Jarvis Landry, Alan Robinson and a slew of others waiting to hear their names called. As we all know, however, former GM John Idzik opted to choose safety Calvin Pryor before following that up with a bust in tight end Jace Amaro in round two. Idzik would eventually address the wide receiver position by taking Jalen Saunders and Shaq Evans, a pair of fourth-rounders who have combined for 1 catch for 7 yards since being selected in 2014, and then with a bit of luck, Quincy Enunwa in round six. As if there weren’t enough blemishes on Idzik’s resume, that alone could be viewed as a fireable offense. Fast forward to this season and as much as scary is at sounds, is it possible that Mike Maccagnan has pulled an Idzik? As was the case with the wide receive position for Idzik in 2014, one could make a case for cornerback being the team’s top need behind the QB position this season. So, in a cornerback class that may rival the wide receiver class of 2014, Maccagnan didn’t take one until round six when he took a pair of big-bodied corners in Jeremy Clark and Derrick Jones to go along with second-year cornerback Juston Burris. Maccagnan clearly thinks highly of second-year cornerback Juston Burris. Potentially compounding the criticism of waiting until round six to select a cornerback is the fact that Maccagnan drafted a pair of wide receivers in ArDarius Stewart and Chad Hansen in rounds three and four respectively. This isn’t to say Stewart and Hansen don’t have the ability to be contributors on offense, but this time around, wide receiver wasn’t nearly as pressing a need as cornerback. With Eric Decker, Quincy Enunwa, Robby Anderson, Quinton Patton and Charone Peake already in the fold, it wouldn’t have been out of the question to expect the Jets to wait until much later in the draft to select a receiver if not passing on the position all together. As it stands now though, the Jets didn’t take a pass at the receiver position but they did just that at cornerback. Maccagnan passed on several highly touted cornerbacks in the early and middle rounds. Marshon Lattimore, Marlon Humphrey, Adoree’ Jackson, Fabian Moreau, Jourdan Lewis, Cordrea Tankersly are just a few that come to mind. All so Maccagnan could choose a pair of safeties and wide receivers. In time, Maccagnan’s decisions may prove to be brilliant, but if the receivers flounder and the corners he passed on go on to excel, the comparisons to Idzik, which up to now are lunacy at best, will become more valid than any Jets fan would have ever hoped or anticipated. Click here to read the full story...
  8. The New York Jets have announced that they signed their 3rd round draft pick, wide receiver ArDarius Stewart. You can discuss this move with other Jets fans in our NY Jets forum. Click here to read the full story...
  9. This is most certainly the year of competition for Gang Green. Nearly every position is up for grabs and should make for a fun training camp. Mike Maccagnan from day one has always said he feels the best way for a team to improve is to bring an abundance of talent and let the best suitor emerge into the starting role. The first and biggest competition will begin with the quarterbacks, the most important position on the team. Josh McCown seems to be the most likely to get the nod week 1 as Bryce Petty is working his way back from shoulder surgery (non-throwing arm). However, the infamous “Hack Hive” has been increasing each week the Jets get closer to camp. Many are urging to see what the 2nd round 2016 pick can do. With all the talent recently acquired, some fans expect Christian Hackenberg to win the job and lead the team moving forward. Regardless of how his development, the Hack Hivers are impatiently waiting for his debut. This leads to the multiple acquisitions at the receiving position. Quinton Patton was one of the first brought in from the San Francisco 49ers where he had worked with John Morton as his wide receiver coach back in 2013-2014. At the draft, the Jets brought in 3 new targets: ArDarius Stewart, Chad Hansen and Jordan Leggett. All of these moves seem to be connected to developing a future crew for the young signal callers. At this point, Eric Decker and Quincy Enunwa are safe. This is not the case for Robby Anderson, Jalin Marshall and Charone Peake. The Jets will have some tough decisions come training camp and preseason. The next competition contest will be the tackle positions. In a recent press conference, Coach Bowles had mentioned that the right and left position will be up for grabs come camp. When they signed free agent Kelvin Beachum, it seemed that he would play the left side, but now that has changed. This puts pressure on 2nd year player Brandon Shell who hopes to play the right side and opens the door for Ben Igalana and Brent Qvale to compete for the starting job on the left side. The last area is one of the most important on defense, cornerback. Since the departure of Darelle Revis, the Jets have had a big pair of shoes to fill. They brought in Marcus Claiborne who will be the new #1 on the depth chart. After that, Marcus Williams will probably line up outside on the right as #2. Buster Skrine will be the starting nickel (#3), but after that it is undetermined. Justin Burress, Daryl Roberts, Jeremy Clark and Derrick Jones will battle for the final #4 spot. More importantly, the top competitor will most likely get a chance to crack one of the top 3 starting positions in 2018. Williams is on a 1-year tender, Claiborne is on a 1-year show me deal, and Skrine is in the last year of his current contract. It may seem scary to think there are so many spots to be determined. However, in retrospect this could factor out well for the team. Having the best players win their jobs could bode well for the imminent rebuilding of the Jets. Click here to read the full story...
  10. On this episode of JetNation Radio Joe and Glenn will be looking at some more overall positional groups and discuss topics surrounding OTAs. Some of the topics include the waiving of Devin Smith, the Jets quarterback situation, Calvin Pryor missing practice, who stood out and who was a disappointment during OTAs. Rule changes, and even some interesting comments from a current AND former Jet. We will discuss the topics and many more on this episode of JetNation Radio. Click here to read the full story...
  11. The possible rise or fall of Christian Hackenberg is possibly the biggest subplot of the 2017 season for the New York Jets. The team does not have a franchise QB right now, and this is a make or break year for both Bryce Petty and Christian Hackenberg. Fans are thrilled about the possibility of drafting a Sam Darnold, Josh Rosen, or Josh Allen in the 2018 NFL draft, and if the season goes according to pundits, the Jets will be in prime position to pick one of them. However, the one big caveat in the situation is the progression of Christian Hackenberg, especially with his accuracy. Hackenberg showed mental aptitude by picking up a pro-style offense as a freshman at Penn State University, and he’s always had a strong arm. Unfortunately, his mechanics are atrocious at times, causing too many errant throws. If Hackenberg improves on mechanics, his accuracy will naturally improve, which should help him live up to his potential. To understand what he might be doing right at practice this year, we first have to understand the problem at hand. So let’s examine the issues with his foot placement. 1) This play is from last year’s pre-season finale against the Philadelphia Eagles. Notice the foot placement of Hackenberg prior to this throw, as his it’s not inline with the target at all. He opens up his hips far too wide, which causes his body to naturally yank the ball towards where his foot is pointing towards. The throw sails wide of the receiver, and it’s an incomplete pass. 2) Same game, similar problem. On this play, Hackenberg doesn’t step into the throw, completely opens up his hips, which causes this ball to be an “all-arm” throw with the ball again showing tendency to move towards where his legs are pointed. This is a bad throwing motion because it’s not inducive to accuracy, nor does it allow you to achieve maximum velocity. The ball sails wide, and is slow enough for the CB to undercut the throw, but the inaccurate pass prevents an interception. 3) Do you see a pattern? Same hips wide open, inaccurate pass. On this play the ball sails too high, and goes for an incomplete pass because it’s another “all-arm” throw. 4) This goes back to college as well, and notice how he does not step into this throw at all, shows “lazy feet” and has the ball sail. 5) On this throw, notice where the feet is pointed, as this is the opposite of the other throws that we have seen. He doesn’t follow through with his foot, which causes his hips to be closed, which causes another “all-arm” throw. His feet is pointed towards the sideline, and the ball sails towards the sideline. He has a partial excuse here since the rusher is coming towards him, but the point of this exercise to show the effects of foot mechanics on ball placement. 6) Open hips, all arm throw, and can’t achieve accuracy or velocity again. Hackenberg had time to step into this throw, but his mechanics under duress evades him, and he throws this ball with horrible foot placement. The throw naturally is inaccurate and doesn’t even reach the receiver. 7) This one is a bit harder to see, but he’s actually doing the throw across hips again. The lead foot isn’t pointing towards the receiver, it’s towards the sideline, and the ball goes towards the sideline. Now, that you have seen those mechanical issues, what is the solution? When a QB throws a pass, the lead foot needs to be pointed towards the receiver (or a couple of inches to the left- if you are a right handed QB) and then let your hips be followed by your shoulder. It’s the ideal throwing motion. Here we have Joe Montana explain the throwing motion, with how feet needs to be pointed towards the target, and to follow through. It’s a short video, and click here for the link. It’s a short video about QB mechanics, with foot and hip movements. This is part of a long series of videos by Chad Pennington, where he focuses in on QB mechanics. He mentions the same theory of pointing your foot towards your target (he allows for a couple of inches to the left) and then letting your hips be chased by your shoulder, thus taking full advantage of your potential energy. Click here for the video. Here is a long video by Jim Harbaugh on QB mechanics and other stuff at a coaches camp. The part about pointing your foot towards the target is near the 32 minute mark of the video, and click here for the link. It’s a good watch, although he does use a bit of NSFW language during the video. There are countless other videos out there expressing the same idea, but these three folks are pretty famous around these parts and lauded for their attention to detail. So how has Christian Hackenberg looked so far this year? These two videos are from one of the best beat writers for the Jets in Connor Hughes, and his Instagram page, click here for the link. What do you notice on this play? Foot placed directly at the receiver, the shoulders are following the hips and the throw is on point. Hackenberg isn’t letting his hips fly open on this play, and causing his arm to do all the work. This play goes for an incomplete pass, but again Hackenberg shows improved mechanics with the foot slightly to the left of the receiver (if not directly at him) and the ball is accurate in terms of horizontal accuracy. Unfortunately, the vertical accuracy is a bit off, although it seems as if it might have been a miscommunication about the timing of the play since it’s early in training camp. Both of these two examples seem to show improved mechanics from Hackenberg. However, it is EXTREMELY early in the process to proclaim anything, since these are just two examples in practice. The sample size is very much limited, so this is not concrete proof that his mechanics have improved. However, this is the best thing to come out of these practices this year because these early practices are exceedingly hard to gauge QB performance, since QB play relies heavily on timing. In these two examples, Hackenberg has seemed to acknowledge the issues facing his foot placement, which should help his accuracy. While this could be construed as making excuses for Hackenberg, part of his mechanical issues stem from the fact that he had a terrible offensive line in college. With rushers consistently in his face, it seems as if he started to rush his throws, causing inaccurate throws. For baseball fans, it’s similar to how an infielder handles a ground ball for a fast runner, rather than a slow runner. You will see them compromise on mechanics to speed up the process, which leads to an uptick in errant throws. It’s a similar theory with Hackenberg (or any QB behind a bad offensive line), who might have felt as if he needed to hurry up his motion to avoid getting hit. It’s also important to remember that these are ideal condition mechanics. If there is a rusher in the face of a passer, and the ball just needs to get out, it’s normal to see any QB out there abandon his mechanics to avoid the sack. Hackenberg, unfortunately, had a habit of abandoning his mechanics far too often when he had space to operate. So it’s important to see Hackenberg’s mechanics in game type situations as well to see if the adjustments are sticking under pressure. Hackenberg was widely panned during the draft process because of his accuracy issues. If he was accurate at Penn State, then he’s a first round QB easily in the draft. Since he wasn’t an accurate QB, many people predicted him to fall to the third or fourth round (if not worse). The Jets seemed to pick him high with the belief that his issues are mechanical, and therefore can be corrected. It’s a gamble for sure, but if they can fix his accuracy issues, then fans won’t be talking about the curse of the second round pick for a long time. Hackenberg’s progress is basically the story of the off-season for the Jets (be it positive or negative) so it will be interesting to see if the mechanical changes are permanent, or just the result of a short sample size. We ask anyone covering the team with access to the practices to please cover the mechanical improvement (or stagnation) from Hackenberg and the accuracy of his passes. Forum Questions: A) How confident are you in the new coaching staff to preach good mechanics to Hackenberg? B) What is your player comparison for Hackenberg as the upside or best case scenario? Click here to read the full story...
  12. The New York Jets completed the first of their ten OTA practices on Tuesday. The players were in shorts and there is no contact. The offense is facing the defense so this is the first test for many of the young players. Here are some highlights from the main stream media. QB Competition McCown, Petty and Hackenberg will all receive equal reps with the first-team offense in the 10 OTA sessions over the next three weeks, according to newly hired offensive coordinator John Morton. Meanwhile, head coach Todd Bowles reiterated that the competition remains “wide open” and said he won’t make a decision on a starter until sometime in training camp, which begins in the last week of July. Eric Decker Decker is coming off hip and shoulder surgeries, but you wouldn’t know it by watching him Tuesday. He moved around at full speed — and moved around very well. At one point, Decker made a sliding, rolling catch. And then he popped right up and jogged back to the huddle. He showed no obvious ill effects of two surgeries. Decker wore a red (non-contact) jersey Tuesday. But he did participate in 11-on-11 teams period action. A great sign for him. Injury Updates The following players wore red (non-contact) jerseys, but participated in practice: Jalin Marshall, Eric Decker, Darryl Roberts, and Marcus Maye. They all got action in team periods. Right guard Brian Winters (shoulder surgery) and left tackle Kelvin Beachum didn’t participate in team periods. Nor did rookie cornerback Jeremy Clark, who is coming off a torn ACL. Sheldon Richardson He is still no fan of Brandon Marshall. Calvin Pryor Pryor was a no-show. John Morton Speaks Some thoughts on the running back rotation from the new offensive coordinator. Click here to read the full story...
  13. The New York Jets have signed Marcus Maye (2nd round – Safety) and Dylan Donahue (5th round – OLB). That means that only Jamal Adams (1st round – Safety) and wide receiver ArDarius Stewart (3rd round – wide receiver) remain unsigned. Daryl Slater provides these additional thoughts: Like all draft picks, Maye and Donahue received four-year contracts. And the only guaranteed money in the contracts is their signing bonuses. Here is a look at the contract value estimates for Maye and Donahue, via overthecap.com: MARCUS MAYE Total max value: $6,554,012 Signing bonus: $2,906,552 Salary cap hits (2017-20): $1,191,638; $1,489,548; $1,787,458; $2,085,368 DYLAN DONAHUE Total max value: $2,601,948 Signing bonus: $201,944 Salary cap hits (2017-20): $515,487, $605,487, $695,487, $785,487 Click here to read the full story...
  14. The NFL is holding their spring league meeting in Chicago this week. Apparently they are trying to shake the No Fun League nickname and today they announced that touchdown celebrations are back. Let’s start with what you still can’t do. Offensive demonstrations Celebrations that are prolonged and delay the game Those directed at an opponent If you do any of those, you will still be penalized. Sorry Mark Gastineau the sack dance slows down the game and it doesn’t involved a touchdown, so that one probably won’t be making a comeback any time soon. How does the NFL explain what has changed? We are relaxing our rules on celebrations to allow players more room to have fun after they make big plays. We know that you love the spontaneous displays of emotion that come after a spectacular touchdown. And players have told us they want more freedom to be able to express themselves and celebrate their athletic achievements. So we will now see celebrations that fall into these categories: Using the football as a prop after a TD Celebrating on the ground Group demonstrations My immediate thought is, hopefully the Jets get in the end zone this year. Once they work out that small issue it will be fun to watch the celebrations. Ickey Shuffle anyone? Click here to read the full story...
  15. The Jets selected safeties in the 1st two rounds of the 2017 NFL draft (Jamal Adams, Marcus Maye). Reports from OTAs today indicate that Calvin Pryor was a no-show. OTAs are voluntary but if you are hoping to keep your job you really should “volunteer” to be there. Hopefully this is nothing, but it is worth watching because the Jets had so many locker room issues last year. Be sure to check out this thread for updates on NY Jets OTAs. Click here to read the full story...