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  1. Last week was not kind to Ryan Fitzpatrick, as he had one of the worst performances at QB in the history of the league, with six interceptions. Let’s see how this unfolded: Bad Magic: 1) The Jets have four receivers and a tight end on this empty backfield play. The Chiefs show man coverage with a single high safety. The biggest problem on this play is that Fitzpatrick has his mind made up on the receiver even before the ball is snapped, because he’s completely locked in on Decker. Quincy Enunwa is breaking open for an easy completion, and if that doesn’t work out, Brandon Marshall also has the chance to be open on this play. However, Ryan Fitzpatrick stares down Decker on this play, and then air mails this throw, so no one had a chance of catching this pass. 2) This play happens on 3rd and 12, and Fitzpatrick chooses to go to an underneath route when they needed 12 yards for the first down. The Jets have to design a pass that is better than this, especially when the defender on Jalin Marshall is so far off the line of scrimmage. While this is a completion for decent yardage, this is considered a failure because Jalin Marshall’s match-up is much better in this situation. While running a spread offense, the QB has to take advantage of match-ups that are favorable, something Fitzpatrick did consistently last week against the Bills. In this case however, he locked into Brandon Marshall as the option, and it resulted in a punt. 3) The Jets are backed up near their goal line on a 3rd and 3 play, and Fitzpatrick makes a good decision. He has Quincy Enunwa open for a pass, but by that time he has committed to running the ball. He gets the first down, and it would have gone as a good play, but he fumbles the ball at the end. The Jets are lucky to grab the ball, as Fitzpatrick pounces on the ball, but it’s a horrible fumble considering it wasn’t a tremendous tackle to begin with. He shows a good ability to step up in the pocket, but he can’t fumble this deep in their own zone. 4) The Chiefs line up in a 2 deep safety look, and the Jets counter with a mid range slant route to Marshall. Brandon Marshall is somewhat well covered on this play, but he does have inside positioning on his defender. However, this is just a horrible throw by Fitzpatrick as it is behind Marshall and low, and falls for an incomplete pass. This pass needs to be more towards the middle of the field and lead his WR, instead the ball goes right towards the trailing defender. The pass is woefully inaccurate. 5) Unfortunately, the first of many interceptions for Ryan Fitzpatrick on the day. The Jets line up with three WRs to the right, one to the left, and a RB on this play, while the Chiefs counter with a single high safety shading heavily over to the left side of the formation. The Chiefs also bring a blitz, but this a head scratching throw by the QB, because he throws this right to the receiver that is the best covered on this play. Quincy Enunwa is running downfield, and seems like a much better emergency option against a safety coming over from the other side of the field. You have to give the Chiefs credit on this one, because the pre-snap look most likely confused Fitzpatrick, as the safety that was lined up all the way on the other side of the field ran across as the play developed. However, it’s still no excuse for a terrible throw and interception. 6) On this play, the Jets empty out the backfield and the Chiefs counter with a single high safety look. The Chiefs play man coverage, but Fitzpatrick fails to check on the right side of this formation, as both Eric Decker and Kellen Davis are open for fairly easy passes. He steps up in the pocket, and misfires a throw to Enunwa on the play, as it falls for an incomplete pass. Fitzpatrick has to recognize the distance between Decker and his defender, especially knowing the route, and take advantage of it, instead of waiting for Enunwa to clear the traffic jam in the middle. This is both a recognition and execution failure by Fitzpatrick. 7) Kellen Davis goes in motion on this play, with no corresponding player movement from the Chiefs, indicating zone coverage on this play, as the Chiefs are also in 2 deep safety look. Fitzpatrick recognizes the zone coverage, and locks in on Quincy Enunwa, running in the middle. The Chiefs are in zone, and as soon as his defender hands off Enunwa, Fitzpatrick makes the throw to his now open WR. However, it’s just a horrible throw, behind the receiver and low again, and it falls for an incomplete pass. These are the kinds of passes that almost all NFL QBs have to complete on a consistent basis, because they had the right route against the right coverage, and still ended up with an incomplete pass. 8) The Jets come out with four WRs, and a RB on this third down play in the red zone. The Chiefs match-up Brandon Marshall on top with a corner back, and a LB playing the underneath route. Brandon Marshall finds a soft part of the defense and is momentarily open but it’s a terrible throw by Fitzpatrick as the ball goes over Marshall’s head. On a critical third down play, Fitzpatrick has to do a better job of allowing his play maker to have a chance at the ball. 9) The Jets have four WRs on this play, with Brandon Marshall being the sole receiver to the left side of the formation. This play highlights some of the biggest weaknesses with Fitzpatrick, because he’s locked onto Marshall from the start of this play. He does a head fake to the right (before anything develops on the right side) and then turns around and fires to Marshall who is running a double stop and go, faking a back shoulder pass. He is definitely open for the pass, but Fitzpatrick misses the throw badly and it falls for an incomplete pass. The worst part about this play of course is that if Fitzpatrick had looked towards the other side with legitimate intent to scan the field, he would have seen an open Enunwa and a wide open Decker for a pass. Fitzpatrick has limitations both physically and mentally, and he showed them off on this play. 10) This is another one read pass for anyone keeping score at home. From the onset, this pass is going to Brandon Marshall, and it’s not without merit because he’s definitely open on this play. He is a good two steps ahead of his defender, when Fitzpatrick decides to throw this ball. However, for some unforeseen reason, he decides to throw a back shoulder pass on a play where the CB is trailing, thus nailing the CB in the back with the pass. The whole point of a back shoulder pass is that the coverage is step for step with the receiver, but the WR can react faster to an under thrown pass and create separation. It makes no sense to throw a back shoulder pass when the WR is actually running by the defender. Just a horrible decision by Fitzpatrick. 11) A first down play from the six yard line, and the Jets are lucky this wasn’t intercepted. The Jets have three receivers to the right, the Chiefs have four defenders in the area, so it probably wasn’t the right time for a lob pass. Eric Berry almost makes a great interception on this play, but the ball falls incomplete. Fitzpatrick wasn’t under pressure to throw this ball, so he was much better served to wait and see if anything else opened up. This is another example of Fitzpatrick having his mind made up before the snap, and the Jets were fortunate to walk away with a second shot at the end zone after this. 12) Ofcourse, the good luck didn’t last for too long, because this is the very next play. While this will go down as a tipped interception, this should have been picked off straight because Fitzpatrick throws it right to the defender. Remember the drop by Marshall in the red zone when the Jets stacked WRs? They have the exact same set up, with a chance for a quick pass strike here, but Fitzpatrick goes away from that, and throws it into traffic for Marshall. Eric Decker set up the easy pass for Fitzpatrick to Marshall, but it goes ignored to the left of the formation. Just a horrible read and throw by Fitzpatrick. 13) On this play, the Jets are spread out with five receivers, while the Chiefs are in a 2 deep safety look. Fitzpatrick does a good job of stepping up in the pocket, but he floats this pass too much for Decker and it’s just out of his reach. He had a step on his defender and Fitzpatrick needs to hit this pass but he over-throws this pass slightly. For a QB that doesn’t have the strongest arm, he has to get these touch passes perfectly, and in this case, he fails. 14) This is a broken play from the start, because there is a blitz and a free man running at Fitzpatrick. He makes a great move to avoid the blitzing LB, and step up in the pocket, but then fires a very misguided attempt at heroism with a throw into the end zone, which promptly gets picked off. Enunwa is the closest target, but this pass goes over him and into the waiting arms of a defender. Many Jet fans will ridicule Geno Smith’s behind the back fumble because he was trying to do too much, but this is much in the same type of play. There was no need to throw this ill advised throw into the end zone, and it ended up being an interception. Sometimes, it’s better to cut your losses and survive for another play. 15) On this play, Enunwa is open down the middle of the field, but Fitzpatrick just makes a bad throw, and it’s behind the intended target. Enunwa has a chance for a big gain, but this is just a terrible throw, especially since guys like Forte and Marshall seemed to also be open on this play. Fitzpatrick is locked into Enunwa from the start of this play, but he has to make a better throw on this play. 16) Quincy Enunwa is again open on this play, but Ryan Fitzpatrick is late with the throw, and then promptly air mails it over everyone’s head. He has a somewhat clean pocket and is looking in the vicinity of Enunwa, but doesn’t pull the trigger on the throw early, and then runs towards the pressure, causing him to throw off-balance on this throw. 17) The art of a screen pass from the school of Christian Hackenberg. This is exactly the type of screen pass that earns criticism for Hackenberg, and Fitzpatrick does a good impression here. He barely sells this screen pass, and then makes a horrible throw that is popped up and nearly intercepted. Notice the lineman that realize it’s a screen pass and go directly towards the RB in this case. It’s a poor set up and execution by the Jets. 18) Another example of Fitzpatrick being absolutely locked in on a receiver from the snap. The Chiefs are in two deep safety look at this point. He is staring down Eric Decker from the start of this play, and then inexplicably waits until the safety comes into play before he makes his throw. It’s just a terrible throw, when he had other options open underneath, including Enunwa. This is another pass the Jets were lucky that it fell incomplete instead of an interception. 19) We have one near interception, followed by another near interception. This another play just staring down Eric Decker the entire way, as he’s somewhat well covered on this play, but Fitzpatrick throws to him anyway. Brandon Marshall and the RB had a chance to be open on the other side of the field, but Fitzpatrick was determined to throw this ball to Decker, and almost pays for it. He over-throws the ball again, and the safety behind Decker almost picks it off. Just a horrible play all around for Fitzpatrick. 20) This is just a flat out bad throw. This is another one where he is staring down a receiver from the onset, and you can see how the safety is following his eyes towards Marshall. Brandon Marshall was well covered on this play, so naturally Fitzpatrick decides to throw it into traffic anyway. 21) The cherry on top of this performance. A horrible throw again, as if the defender had an invisibility cloak. The RB is running a wheel route on this play, and Fitzpatrick decides to throw it to the trailing LB, so he can run it back for a Pick 6. There are other guys open on this play, but this is another locked in syndrome play. 22) Since the only fitting way to end this game was an interception, Ryan Fitzpatrick obliged by throwing another one. Brandon Marshall has one on one coverage against his defender down the sideline, so Ryan Fitzpatrick throws it right to the defender. He gives no chance for Marshall to make a play on the ball because this is sent right to the corner back on this play. Conclusion: This is the worst QB performance I have seen, because it was a constant stream of bad decisions and bad throws during this game. Even if you go and read our College Scouting Report on Christian Hackenberg, he doesn’t look nearly as bad as Ryan Fitzpatrick did in Week 3. This was one of those all time worst performances, and it could have easily been worse. There was a legitimate chance of 10 interceptions in the game, as Fitzpatrick just didn’t have it Fitzpatrick Grade: Detained Forum Question(s) What grade would you give Fitzpatrick Would you tell Geno Smith to be ready this week? What do you think about the new format, breaking down the different parts? It was mainly done so people didn’t have to read 4000+ word posts at once. Click here to read the full story...
  2. The Jets are a talented team on offense, and sometimes the play makers on offense can help make up for the inadequacies at QB. Let’s see who helped out the QB this week: Sidekick Power: 1) The Jets lined up with three WRs to the left of the formation, and attempt a play similar to the one where Enunwa ran for a first down against the Bills. Pre-snap, the defender on Enunwa is a good 8 yards away from the line of scrimmage, so this is a safe throw. Both Marshall and Decker are tasked with blocking on this play, and they do a good job. While it’s not a major gain, this is a decent run by Enunwa, especially with a swarming defense, and both Marshall and Decker do a decent job of blocking. Enunwa does a decent job of making the first man miss, but there are just too many defenders in the area for him to break this open. Most of the work on this play is done by the receivers. 2) Robby Anderson comes into play for the Jets, and immediately shows off his speed. The Chiefs are again in single high safety, and pre-snap read indicates man coverage as the defender moves with Kellen Davis. Robby Anderson is matched up one on one to the left of the formation. He makes a slight stutter step move at the snap, and then just runs by his defender creating about a yard plus of separation. However, the throw is behind him and he has to slow his speed and reach down to make this catch. If this pass was thrown leading the WR, this could have been a TD. However, Fitzpatrick throws behind him, causing the defender to catch up to Anderson and immediately tackle him. 3) On this play, the Jets line up with four recievers, and Bilal Powell in the backfield. The Chiefs are matched up well for this play, but Bilal Powell sneaks out of the backfield in the middle of the field, and grabs the pass. While it’s not clear in this angle, the pass was low, and barely secured by the RB. Instead of stepping up in the pocket, Fitzpatrick stares down the RB, which almost causes a sack, and an errant throw. This is a good catch by Powell. Conclusion: As you saw in the last article, the Jets receivers had plenty of drops in the game against the Chiefs, but they did also make some plays for Ryan Fitzpatrick. The best play seems to be from Robby Anderson, as he makes a good adjustment to the pass and showed a nice glimpse of his down the field speed on the play as well. Please check out the next part of our Film Breakdown: Bad Magic, which will be posted soon. Click here to read the full story...
  3. The second part of our film breakdown for Week 3 against the Kansas City Chiefs. Let’s see how some players let down the QB this week: Assistant’s Failure: 1) This is a 3rd and 12 play in the second quarter and the Chiefs are playing it safe by having one deep safety, but all their corner backs are playing about 10 yards off the line of scrimmage. They are playing prevent defense on this one because they want to run downhill towards the receiver, rather than backpedal in a critical spot. The Chiefs are giving up about seven yards on this play willingly, saying they are better equipped at tackling the receiver than he is at getting those extra five yards. This is one of the limitations of having a QB that doesn’t have a particularly strong arm, because the defense is betting their line of corner backs beyond the first down could close in on any pass, so they have now dictated the type of pass that is going to be thrown. A strong armed (and accurate) QB would stand a better chance against this defense, because there isn’t much help over the top, so a deep curl route or out route could be dangerous. As we know, Ryan Fitzpatrick is no such QB, so he takes the safer option to Powell, who would have been short anyway of the first down. However, Powell further muddles the situation by fumbling the ball here, giving the Chiefs great field position. Powell has to hold onto this ball. 2) The play is a failure on a couple of levels. On the most basic level, Brandon Marshall drops an easy pass on first down here and the pass almost gets intercepted. The Jets are lined up in a stack formation with the receivers on both sides. Marshall is open for a quick pass, and should have gained some yardage, but just flat out drops the ball. The more complex failure on this play is on the pre-snap read. If you look at the defense before the snap, they have two guys lined over Decker/Marshall. They are about 5 or 6 yards behind, so this gives a good opportunity for some yards after the catch. The safety is also shading over to this side, which indicates that there would have to be multiple broken tackles for a TD on this play. However, look on the other side pre-snap, and you see the same stack principle, but only one defender in the area. The LB assigned to Enunwa is playing well inside, a good 5 yards inside of the WR he is responsible for. Chan Gailey has a tendency to call mirror plays, so it looks like they have the same exact quick WR screen pass set up, but on this end, Jalin Marshall would only have to beat one guy to the end zone, and he’s well inside of the play to begin with. If Quincy Enunwa could make a good block, this is pretty much an easy TD. While Marshall failed with the drop, and that’s the biggest negative factor on this play, Ryan Fitzpatrick makes a bad read at the line as well. 3) This is first down play in the 4th quarter, and Jalin Marshall again comes into play here. The Jets have three wide receivers to the right of the formation, as the Chiefs are again in single high safety look. The defensive backs are relatively close to their men, in what seems to be man coverage. When Jalin Marshall moves, the defensive back moves with him, but hands him off to the inside CB, a method used frequently by the Bengals in Week 1. However, Marshall is still open for this pass, but Fitzpatrick hesitates on this play for an extra second, and leads this pass outside. It’s not a great pass by any means, but a NFL WR should hang onto this one. Marshall, however, makes a bad drop, and it’s ruled an incomplete pass. 4) Another situation that is very similar to a situation from the Bengals game. In Week 1, the Jets had a similar scenario where Fitzpatrick didn’t look at Enunwa, and instead threw an incomplete pass towards Marshall. In this case, Fitzpatrick realizes the coverage, and makes the correct read to Enunwa, but he drops the ball. This is actually a great throw by Fitzpatrick, but Enunwa just loses the ball coming out of a crowd and doesn’t catch it. For a team that needed their No. 3 WR to step up in this game, this is a horrible drop. 5) Another great pass, another drop by Enunwa. The Jets were desperate by this point, and this is a huge drop by Enunwa. Fitzpatrick throws a beautiful pass here that is slightly ahead of Enunwa, but one that should have absolutely been caught. Conclusion: Ryan Fitzpatrick was far from perfect this past Sunday, but there were others that failed to help him out during this game. The biggest culprit seems to be Quincy Enunwa this week, right after having his breakout game last week against the Bills. If he wants to become more than a No. 3 WR in the league, he needs to reduce the drops and be more consistent. Please read Part 3 of our Film Breakdown, Sidekick Power, which will be posted soon. Click here to read the full story...
  4. The Jets rolled into Arrowhead Stadium this past Sunday, and promptly got steam rolled by the Chiefs. It was quite possibly one of the worst performances by an offense in recent memory, especially on the passing side. Let’s see how Ryan Fitzpatrick and the Jets did against the Kansas City Chiefs, although be forewarned, as it is not pretty. Fitzmagic: 1) This play occurs on the first drive, on a 2nd down and 9. The Chiefs are lined up in a single high safety look, much similar to the ones presented by the Bills last week. The Jets are spread out, and there are multiple options on this play. While it’s not easily discernible from this angle, Fitzpatrick is locked into Brandon Marshall from the onset, which works out for the Jets because he gets open in the middle of the field. Notice the slight movement from Marshall showing he may go outside, which causes the CB to turn his hips ever so lightly. This little move helps him get greater separation for this throw. It’s a good throw, and catch by Fitzpatrick and Marshall. The play is also well designed because if Marshall is covered, then Enunwa is open on the progressive read further to the right of the QB. 2) The Jets are again spread wide with an empty backfield, but the Chiefs have gone to a 2 man safety, unlike the Bills last week. Fitzpatrick does a good job of staying steady in the pocket, and makes a good throw to Bilal Powell, who is cutting across the middle. A two man safety look against Fitzpatrick means that they are going to cut off the deep pass, so Fitzpatrick rightfully checks down to an open Bilal Powell. A slant route by a RB against a LB will usually open up in most cases if there is no safety in the vicinity, and it happens again. 3) This play happens with about five minutes left in the third quarter, and this is the third passing play that was deemed good in this game, which should give insight into how well the offense played this week. This is a 3rd and 1 play, and the defense has sold out for the run. The key on this play is Brandon Marshall, essentially picking off two players to allow Enunwa to be open. However, this is a very good play by Fitzpatrick, because his initial position in the pocket would have caused this throwing lane to be occupied, but he does a good job of moving to his left and throwing to an open Enunwa. This is a very good call on 3rd and short in what most likely was four down territory anyway, and the Jets get a big conversion. 4) This play happens on 2nd and three, with the Chiefs again showing a two deep safety look. There are three wide receivers, with Kellen Davis masquerading as a possible fourth option, along with a RB in the backfield. When Kellen Davis went in motion, the Chiefs did not have anyone follow him across the line, showing zone coverage. Quincy Enunwa is in the slot on this play, and as soon as the play starts, both safeties move towards Marshall (to the left of the formation) and Decker (to the right of the formation) respectively, allowing Enunwa to be open in the middle of the field. Quincy finds a soft spot in the zone from the point where he is handed off by his defender to the safety, and Fitzpatrick does a good job of hitting the open WR. When defenses go to zone coverage with two deep safeties, they are usually daring the QB to find seams in the zone, and challenging their arm strength to get the ball in the zone before a defender can close the gap. Fitzpatrick does a good job of getting the ball to Enunwa on this play. 5) This is a third down and ten play in the fourth quarter, and a good example of defensive recognition by Fitzpatrick. The Chiefs come out in a two deep safety look to begin with, but closer to the snap, one of the safeties move up towards Eric Decker, trying to double team him off a shallow crossing route. However, this backfires, because Decker is slated to run a deep crossing route, so the incoming safety is now in a bad position to cover him. Fitzpatrick steps up in the pocket realizing that Decker has the momentum advantage, and throws to him as he’s running open before the second safety can come into play. Fitzpatrick throws this ball before Decker is actually open, but he shows good recognition of play development and the Jets gets a huge conversion. 6) The Jets are spread wide with five receiving options against a two safety look from the Chiefs. This defense leaves the middle of the field open for Fitzpatrick, and he takes advantage by running for about eight yards. This is good recognition by Fitzpatrick, and he shows good situational awareness in this case to take the yards available to him. Against spread offenses with slower QBs, defenses tend to leave the middle of the field open in empty sets because they have faith in adjusting to a run faster than the QB can find the hole. It’s paramount that the Jets take advantage of such situations to keep defenses honest in the middle. Fitzpatrick does a good job here of taking advantage of one such situation. 7) The Jets are their side of the field, and they need to move down the field quickly. This is a good quick pass set up by the Jets, and Marshall has a chance to really go down the field, if not for a great shoestring tackle by the defender. The bad part about this throw is that Fitzpatrick is locked into Marshall the entire way, so the defense is collapsing to Marshall even before the pass is thrown. However, there is a seam in the zone and Marshall tries to make this a great play but gets tackled. 8) The Chiefs come out with a one deep safety look, and when Bilal Powell goes in motion, there is a defender following him, showing man coverage. Fitzpatrick does a good job of recognizing this, and realizing the defender on Jalin Marshall is playing about ten yards deep, setting up an easy completion. This is a play that is a direct byproduct of the movement from Powell, as it gives insight into the defense and allows for easy completions when scanning the field. There is a good amount of chatter about the ability of QBs to have pre-snap reads at the line of scrimmage, and this is a very good example of it in action. This is not a set play from the start where Jalin Marshall is the first read. The read changes with the coverage look, and sometimes the defense will adjust by moving up the defender when they know the QB knows it’s man coverage counteracting the knowledge gained by movement. Conclusion: Fitzpatrick does a good job of recognizing the defense on these passes and hitting players over the middle. He showed good ability to move up in the pocket, and even run for a few yards when it was presented. The Chiefs defense dared the Jets to pass deep and they did not take advantage. The game plan seemed to indicate that Chan Gailey went more towards a short field passing game. That concludes the Fitzmagic portion of our review this week. Please read Part 2 of our Film Review sessions, with the Assistant’s Failure in Week 3. Click here to read the full story...
  5. By Glenn Naughton Just a couple of days after waiving reserve linebacker Julian Stanford in order to make room for newly acquired tight end Austin Seferian-Jenkins, the Jets have added the pre-season standout to their practice squad. In order to make room for Stanford on the ten-man unit, the team released speedy wide receiver Wendall Williams. A 3-year pro out of Wagner, Stanford flew under the radar before standing out in multiple pre-season contests on both defense and special teams, earning himself a spot on the 53-man roster before being demoted. Click here to read the full story...
  6. Ranking All 32 Teams Based on Week 3, and Previous Performances: New England Patriots (3-0) Denver Broncos (3-0) Minnesota Vikings (3-0) Philadelphia Eagles (3-0) Green Bay Packers (2-1) Pittsburgh Steelers (2-1) Baltimore Ravens (3-0) New York Giants (2-1) Carolina Panthers (1-2) Seattle Seahawks (2-1) Kansas City Chiefs (2-1) Cincinnati Bengals (1-2) Atlanta Falcons (2-1) Houston Texans (2-1) Dallas Cowboys (2-1) Arizona Cardinals (1-2) New York Jets (1-2) Oakland Raiders (2-1) Indianapolis Colts (1-2) Washington Redskins (1-2) Los Angeles Rams (2-1) Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1-2) Tennessee Titans (1-2) Buffalo Bills (1-2) Detroit Lions (1-2) San Diego Chargers (1-2) Jacksonville Jaguars (0-3) Miami Dolphins (1-2) New Orleans Saints (0-3) San Francisco 49ers (1-2) Chicago Bears (0-3) Cleveland Browns (0-3) #17 New York Jets (1-2): After winning AFC Offensive Player of the week with 374 passing yards and a touchdown, Fitzpatrick turned around and threw six interceptions in one game. While a good chunk of the blame falls on his shoulders, the rest of the team looked lethargic and out of sync as well. While Fitzpatrick and the wide receivers were all over the place this week, the secondary has been a huge issue since week one. This was the worst time for gang green to suffer a blowout loss with four tough games ahead of them. The Jets could handle the loss one of two ways: they could let it demoralize the team and continue to lose, or they can use it as a “turning point” as Ryan Fitzpatrick called it and prove the game was an aberration. Rankings Going into Previous Weeks: Week 1: # 10 Week 2: # 13 Week 3: # 9 Click here to read the full story...
  7. By Glenn Naughton NFL insider Rand Getlin is reporting that former Buffalo Bills and New Orleans Saints running back CJ Spiller is set to work out for the Jets on Tuesday. A pro-bowler in 2012 with the Bills, under Chan Gailey with Ryan Fitzpatrick at quarterback, Spiller was cut loose by the Saints after just one season in New Orleans. Spiller could give the Jets a veteran running back with kick return experience to take on the number three spot on the roster that his currently held by Troymaine Pope. Click here to read the full story...
  8. By Glenn Naughton The New York Jets have announced the addition of former Tampa Bay Buccaneers tight end Austin Seferian-Jenkins who was let go by the Bucs following a DUI last week. The Seferian-Jenkins signing will undoubtedly come under fire from fans scared off by his history of multiple alcohol related incidents as well as his struggles on the field. Earlier this season, the 6′ 6” University of Washington product was sent home mid-practice, prompting his head coach, Dirk Koetter to claim Seferian-Jenkins “didn’t know what he was doing”. Surely there will be plenty of fans dismissing the signing while pointing to the recent struggles of quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick, but the fact of the matter is that Seferian-Jenkins, if he can get his act together, is a player who will be around many years after Ryan Fitzpatrick is gone, and has the potential to give the Jets another high-quality skill player for years to come, joining youngsters Quincy Enunwa, Robby Anderson, Jalin Marshall and Charone Peake. Surely the Jets will have a short leash on Seferian-Jenkins who will be expected to show he’s learned from his mistakes in Tampa. If not, being on his rookie deal, it won’t cost the Jets much to send him packing, just as the Bucs did. In order to make room for Seferian-Jenkins, they parted ways with linebacker Julian Stanford. Click here to read the full story...
  9. You come off a mini-bye and produce that mess??? Oooh look the Jets just turned the ball over again, shocking!!! When is this team going to stop having these “wet the bed” games??? Special Teams – Jalin Marshall had a nice initial KR but his hands are becoming a problem now. Back to back games with fumbles for “scoop & scores” is not acceptable. – Thanks to Nick Folk for not allowing us to be shutout. – Lachlan Edwards didn’t have to punt with the amount of times we turned the ball over. Offense – EIGHT turnovers, really??? I don’t understand why we didn’t compete. – Horrible red zone efficiency. – Ryan Fitzpatrick was the biggest culprit on Sunday, SIX INT’s and three in the end zone. It’s amazing to think if he was more patient we actually had a shot at tying the game up at 17. You knew things were headed downhill when Fitzpatrick couldn’t take advantage of the gift we got when Ware fumbled out of the end zone for a touchback. – Nice inital catch by Robby Anderson. – Matt Forte and Quincy Enunwa showed up today, credit to them. Also credit to Brandon Marshall for playing and trying to rally the team after the first couple of turnovers. Defense -The offense was atrocious but the defense doesn’t get off the hook, their performance wasn’t much better. Even though they only allowed 10 points, didn’t you know Smith “dinks & dunks”? Why was the coverage so soft? Didn’t you know Kelce was his favorite weapon? Why was he running free over the middle of the field? I thought Darron Lee was drafted for those matchups, where was he? It reminded me of a Ryan defense. – Bowles it’s alright to call timeout at the end of the first half, you can’t accumulate them. – Awful 3rd down efficiency. – Nice debut for Juston Burris with a PBU on a deep pass. Click here to read the full story...
  10. New York Jets Report Card Week 3: New York Jets @ Kansas City Chiefs 9/25/16 Quarterback: F Fitzpatrick: 20/44, 188, 0/6, 3 rushes for 22 yards I’m not sure if I’ve ever witnessed a poorer performance by a Jets QB other than, say, Geno’s 3 consecutive picks. That’s saying a lot, considering the kinds of performances the Jets have had at QB in the past. Not even listed in the stat line is one fumble which he did recover. It got so bad towards the end of the 4th that it was almost as if he was trying to throw interceptions. Someone needs to look into whether he put any money on this game in Vegas, and investigate to find out if he was replaced by a look-alike robot that replicated his appearance in every way but had never met nor interacted with any of his linemen, coaches or receivers. Running Backs: C Forte: 15/65/0, 2 receptions for -1 yard Powell: 4/30/0, 6 receptions for 41 yards Powell put one on the ground early and that was a momentum enhancer for the Chiefs, but the ruling should have never gone that way: he pretty clearly had possession of the football to the ground. It was nice to see him get more involved in the offensive gameplan and let’s look for him to take more carries as the season progresses. Forte had a solid if not spectacular game as he continues to take the majority of the carries early on in 2016. Wide Receivers/Tight Ends: D B. Marshall: 3/27/0 Decker: 1/31/0 Enunwa: 4/37/0 Anderson: 2/34/0 J. Marshall: 2/19/0 Robbie Anderson finally saw some time on the field and was successful in limited targets. Marshall, Decker, Enunwa & co. struggled with miscommunication and were responsible for numerous drops and deflected passes that led to interceptions. Off of 2 straight excellent performances, Enunwa was particularly disappointing. Offensive Line: C+ Fitzpatrick wasn’t sacked, but felt the heat often. The push in the ground game wasn’t there, though the Jets got away from the run early. Defensive Line: C+ Leonard Williams and Sheldon Richardson had a half a sack each, and the line bounced back quite a bit from the performance in Buffalo but it would be nice to see them truly take over a game like they did at home against Cincinnati in week 1. Linebackers: B- An active game for rookie Lee and 2nd year player Mauldin who both contributed half a sack. The Jets limited the Chiefs to 72 yards on the ground, quite a feat considering the large lead that KC got out to early on in this contest. Guarding the screen pass and sealing the edge remain major concerns moving forward. Secondary: C Alex Smith had a very efficient game, going 25/33 for 237 yards, 1 TD and 0 picks. But then, that’s kinda what Alex Smith does. As a small comfort, the Jets weren’t really bit by the big play over the top, the 50+ yard bomb that they were victimized by against the Bengals and Bills. Special Teams: D Turnovers on special teams are the absolute worst – major momentum swings that are simply tough to stomach. Jalin Marshall has breakout special teams star potential, but he’s shown a propensity for putting the ball on the ground and he did it again here. Coaching: D For 3 straight games now, the Jets have made sloppy errors that suggest poor preparation. You can’t blame coaching for execution, but you can blame it for preparation. No adjustments were made at halftime that showed any significant impact. Click here to read the full story...
  11. Thursday night against the Buffalo Bills Brandon Marshall suffered an injury that appeared to be very serious. At first Marshall thought his career was over, but he was back on the field five minutes later. Marshall was later diagnosed with a mild knee sprain. After missing practice all week other than limited participation on Friday, Marshall was listed as questionable for Sunday. It’s likely that Todd Bowles will have Marshall on a snap count. On the defensive side, leader David Harris is also active. Erin Henderson is inactive today, giving rookie Darron Lee another starting opportunity. Lee is currently leading the Jets’ defense in total tackles. Another active player worth mentioning is third round pick Jordan Jenkins who is reclaiming his role at outside linebacker from the inactive Mike Catapano, an ex-Chief. Other inactives include: Bryce Petty, Christian Hackenberg, Troymaine Pope, Brandon Shell, and Darryl Roberts Petty and Hackenberg are both still inactive. It’s likely that Hackenberg will receive a red shirt season, remaining inactive all season. Petty is still recovering from an injury he suffered in the final game of the preseason. After throwing a touchdown strike to wide receiver Robby Anderson, Petty took a crushing hit injuring his shoulder on the play. As of right now, and most likely for the rest of the season, Geno Smith will be backing up Ryan Fitzpatrick. Troymaine Pope, who was acquired on waivers from the Seahawks after Khiry Robinson re-injured his leg, remains inactive. With the way the Jets have been using Matt Forte even Bilal Powell is barely seeing the field. Barring an injury Pope will likely remain on the inactives list this season. Fifth round pick Brandon Shell will likely also see a red shirt season. Shell showed his inexperience in the preseason, and isn’t ready for live action yet. The Jets’ struggling secondary will only have four cornerbacks suit up with Darryl Roberts sitting out again this week. If the struggles continue, there could be some shaking up of the depth chart. The Jets got a much-needed win last Thursday night, but there’s a big difference between going 2-1 and 1-2. The Jets will look to grab a win on the road in the loud Arrowhead Stadium. Click here to read the full story...
  12. By Glenn Naughton The Jets and Chiefs are set to do battle at 4:25 this afternoon and unpredictable weather patterns have the game conditions varying from heavy rains with high winds to cloudy with a light breeze. We won’t know for sure until kickoff, but here are a few things we do know about the match-up. 1- Ryan Fitzpatrick and Chan Gailey have been through a lot together, to include four showdowns against the Chiefs. Fitzpatrick and Gailey own a 3-1 record in those meetings. More importantly, the pair have won two out of three at Arrowhead Stadium. In their most recent appearance, Gailey and Fitzpatrick came away with a 41-7 win in front of a fired up crowd for the Chiefs home opener in 2011. Fitzpatrick thew for just 208 yards that day, but also had 4 touchdown passes to zero interceptions. Former Jets wide receiver David Nelson hauled in 4 passes for 66 yards that day, both tied for team highs. 2- The last time these two teams met was a down time for Gang Green. The Jets dropped a 24-10 contest to the Chiefs with Michael Vick under center who was starting for the struggling Geno Smith who had thrown 3 interceptions on just 8 pass attempts in a 43-23 loss the week before. Looking back, the best thing to come out of that game was the surprisingly effective performance of then-rookie cornerback Marcus Williams, who would finish the day with 7 tackles in his NFL debut. 3- As the Arizona Cardinals defensive coordinator, Jets Head Coach Todd Bowles faced Andy Reid’s Chiefs two years ago in Kansas City and the Cards came away with a 17-14 win. Chiefs running back Jamaal Charles, who has been ruled out for today’s game, accounted for both Chiefs scores that day. One on a 63-yard run, and the other on an 18-yard reception. 4- Charles being ruled out isn’t the only break the Jets get today as Justin Houston who has 3 sacks in two career games against the Jets, including two in their last meeting, will not be suiting up. The crowd noise at Arrowhead is one of Kansas City’s top allies, so having a veteran quarterback who has weathered that storm and played at a high level in the past could help the Jets take a one-game lead in the all-time series between the two teams which currently stands at 17-17-1. Click here to read the full story...
  13. By Glenn Naughton The Jets and Chiefs are set to do battle at 4:25 this afternoon and unpredictable weather patterns have the game conditions varying from heavy rains with high winds to cloudy with a light breeze. We won’t know for sure until kickoff, but here are a few things we do know about the match-up. 1- Ryan Fitzpatrick and Chan Gailey have been through a lot together, to include four showdowns against the Chiefs. Fitzpatrick and Gailey own a 3-1 record in those meetings. More importantly, the pair have won two out of three at Arrowhead Stadium. In their most recent appearance, Gailey and Fitzpatrick came away with a 41-7 win in front of a fired up crowd for the Chiefs home opener in 2011. Fitzpatrick thew for just 208 yards that day, but also had 4 touchdown passes to zero interceptions. Former Jets wide receiver David Nelson hauled in 4 passes for 66 yards that day, both tied for team highs. 2- The last time these two teams met was a down time for Gang Green. The Jets dropped a 24-10 contest to the Chiefs with Michael Vick under center who was starting for the struggling Geno Smith who had thrown 3 interceptions on just 8 pass attempts in a 43-23 loss the week before. Looking back, the best thing to come out of that game was the surprisingly effective performance of then-rookie cornerback Marcus Williams, who would finish the day with 7 tackles in his NFL debut. 3- As the Arizona Cardinals defensive coordinator, Jets Head Coach Todd Bowles faced Andy Reid’s Chiefs two years ago in Kansas City and the Cards came away with a 17-14 win. Chiefs running back Jamaal Charles, who has been ruled out for today’s game, accounted for both Chiefs scores that day. One on a 63-yard run, and the other on an 18-yard reception. 4- Charles being ruled out isn’t the only break the Jets get today as Justin Houston who has 3 sacks in two career games against the Jets, including two in their last meeting, will not be suiting up. The crowd noise at Arrowhead is one of Kansas City’s top allies, so having a veteran quarterback who has weathered that storm and played at a high level in the past could help the Jets take a one-game lead in the all-time series between the two teams which currently stands at 17-17-1. Click here to read the full story...
  14. By Glenn Naughton That didn’t last very long, did it? Julian Howsare, the fullback who shocked many onlookers by sticking on the Jets’ initial 53-man roster was waived just a few days ago, but as we expected, he has been added to the team’s practice squad once again. A converted college linebacker out of Clarion, the versatile Howsare makes for a valuable practice squad player due to his experience on offense and defense to go along with a stellar history on special teams. Click here to read the full story...
  15. By Glenn Naughton The 1-1 New York Jets head to Kansas City to take on the 1-1 Chiefs at Arrowhead Stadium, one of the league’s most hostile environments to play in. The fans in Kansas City were a legitimate “12th man” long before the Seattle Seahawks front office figured out a way to monetize the title not long ago. With the Jets coming to town, the Chiefs will have their hands full after dropping a 19-12 contest to the Houston Texans on the road. Let’s take a quick peek at some of the key match-ups that Gang Green can look to exploit against Alex Smith and company. Contain Conley: If not for their porous secondary, the Jets would be sitting pretty at 2-0 with a pair of blowout victories. As it stands however, the Jets dropped their opener and squeaked past the Bills on Thursday despite the shortcomings of the defensive backs, specifically, Darrelle Revis. Revis allowed Marquis Goodwin, a virtual unknown, to haul in an 84-yard bomb from Tyrod Taylor on the Bills’ first drive. This week, it’s another little-known receiver who may not be an Olympic sprinter as Goodwin once was, but second-year receiver Chris Conley is no slouch at 6′ 2”, 215 and armed with the 4.35 40 he ran during the NFL combine. As Jets Head Coach Todd Bowles has said on multiple occasions, the NFL is a copycat league, and until you prove you can “put out the fire”, teams are going to keep testing you. Alex Smith doesn’t air it out very often, but look for the Chiefs to take a shot deep down the field to Conley, especially if he’s one-on-one with Revis. Let Leo Roar: The Jets saw a drop-off from week one to week two when their defensive line went from seven sacks to zero. That should change this week as the Chiefs have had their share of struggles in the middle of their offensive line, especially at center and right guard. The Jets have been moving their versatile group of defensive lineman up and down the formation thus far, but lining Williams up at nose tackle, where he has looked overpowering at times, could pay off big time against second-year center Mitch Morse. While Williams is a prime candidate for a big game, it would really be silly to look past any of Gang Green’s veteran linemen as the Chiefs had a very difficult time up front against a Texans defensive line that has looked nowhere near as good as the Jets up to this point. Tood Bowles and Kacy Rodgers may also want to attack the A-gap to the right of the formation with speedy rookie Darron Lee who has the speed and burst to take advantage of the Chiefs’ struggles. Look for Leonard Williams and Company to have more success getting to the QB this week. Silence is Golden: As stated above, Arrowhead Stadium is one of the most difficult stadiums to have success in, due mostly in part to a rowdy crowd. The Jets have spent a good portion of this week in practice pumping in crowd noise and using a silent count on offense as one would expect. AFC offensive player of the week, quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick told reporters that the Jets would be using a silent count throughout the contest on third down. Being able to maintain communication with his receivers at the line will be key in running an efficient offense, but the 11-year veteran should be just fine. Gang Green has to be prepared for the possibility of Marshall being in street clothes on Sunday. The “No Marshall” Plan: With star receiver Brandon Marshall looking like a game-time decision due to a banged up left knee, there’s a chance the Jets will go with Eric Decker and Quincy Enunwa is their top two receivers, meaning they’ll need Enunwa to perform with a bigger target on his back, and find a third option to step up and make some plays. After fumbling his first-ever NFL reception, Jalin Marshall bounced back with a solid performance against the Bills last week (3 rec, 45 yards) and speedy pre-season standout, Robby Anderson has yet to see the ball come his way. If Marshall can’t go, that could all change this week. Let Darron Do His Thing: We highlighted rookie linebacker Darron Lee as a key player in last week’s meeting with the Bills as he was the obvious choice to spy the scrambling Tyrod Taylor for the Bills and it was an area in which he excelled. Alex Smith is a classic pocket passer, but he too has the ability to make big plays with his legs. With that being the case, look for more of Lee hanging around the line of scrimmage to limit Smith’s production. Re-introduce AA: Jeremy Maclin is the Chief’s top weapon through the air but lacks the speed of Marquis Goodwin or the physicality of A.J. Green, who torched the Jets in week one. Expect the Jets cornerbacks to do a solid job on Maclin. With tight end Travis Kelce being Kansas City’s next best option and Bowles having employed some 4-2-5 formations this season, getting the re-signed Antonio Allen back on the field to lend a hand with Kelce might not be a bad idea. Conclusion: Yes, Arrowhead is hostile, but the Chiefs struggles up front should prevent them from getting anything going on offense, while Ryan Fitzpatrick will look to stay hot after a 374 yard passing day on Thursday. The game is close until the Jets run away with a couple of late scores. Jets- 27 Chiefs- 13 Click here to read the full story...