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    the interweb
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  • What is your favorite Jets related memory?
    When the Jets won the Super Bowl in 2012. Oh sorry, forgot that you can't see the future.
  • Do you have season tickets?
    No, I do everything online.
  • What Jets memory broke your heart?
    When the Jets fired Herman Edwards. He kept me busy.
  • Where you alive for Super Bowl III?
    No, I was born in 2005.
  1. Anyone who has paid attention to the Jets over the first two weeks with even an ounce of objectivity has to have been impressed with the performance of rookie safety Jamal Adams, and according to the folks at Pro Football Focus, it’s not without reason. According to PFF, Adams has earned the highest grade of any rookie safety in what was largely viewed as a very deep class. Coming in behind Adams at number one are Malik Hooker of the Colts, and Saints safety Marcus Williams. Click here to read the full story...
  2. The Jets announced the release of reserve linebacker Freddie Bishop to sign former Seattle Seahawks and Tennessee Titans linebacker David Bass. In just over four pro seasons, Bass has played in 51 games (9 starts), picking up 5.5 sacks with a career high of 3 in 2014. In five games with the Jets dating back to last season, Bishop had 9 career tackles with no sacks. Click here to read the full story...
  3. Christopher Johnson has taken over control of the NY Jets while Woody serves as Ambassador to the U.K. Christopher spoke to the media on Tuesday. The full transcript appears below, here are some highlights. Woody Johnson is completely out of day-to-day football operations. Christopher Johnson says he doesn’t even discuss football with his brother Woody. Christopher says he has always been in the background and in important meetings, so that has helped the transition. The decision to keep Bowles and Macc or let them go won’t come down to wins and losses. On how often he is in contact with Woody regarding the team… Not at all. I’m in touch with him constantly, but none of it is about football – other than he said he heard from somebody that I was doing a good job. On how he has been adjusting to his new role… It’s interesting going from being in the background here, where I’ve been involved fairly deeply since the beginning. Now, I’ve come to the fore. I think the biggest adjustment is actually dealing with the public aspect of the game, but I’ve gotten more involved with everybody in this building – from the business side to the coaches to especially, the players. It’s been great. I’ve loved every minute of it. On the dynamic with him and Woody regarding an important football decision… Over the years, he always bounced things off of me and it would be great if I could do that with him, but he really has a full time job over there. We are not discussing football. He’s out of it. On why Woody will not be involved… He said I’m stepping away from football. That (ambassador) is his full time job. It’s a huge job. On the fan’s perception of the organization and what he believes is fair and unfair about that perception… One of my roles here is to get into the fan base a little bit more. That’s definitely one of my priorities this year, starting now, especially with this first home game. I can’t say what that perception is exactly. I hope it is that this is a team on the rise. There are some growing pains right now, no question, but we have a plan and I’m going to do everything I can to support the people in this building – in particular, Neil (Glat) and Mike (Maccagnan) and Todd (Bowles). I’ve been a fan since I was a little kid. I bleed green like they do. I’m hoping that they appreciate what we’re doing to get back to greatness. On if it will be entirely his decision to evaluate Bowles and Maccagnan… Woody isn’t involved in that at all. On his role with the organization for the past 16 years… I’ve been very much in the background, but I’ve been part of almost all of the major decisions. I’ve been in the room for pretty much all of the big changes and, even when I wasn’t, Woody was calling me up to ask me what I thought of things. To tell you the truth, that has made this transition a little bit easier because it’s not like I’m a neophyte in this building. There is still a lot for me to learn. I’m still working through my own progression here, but I think things are going pretty well. On how often he speaks with Maccagnan and Bowles… I speak with Mike almost daily. I speak with Todd a little bit less often. He’s a man of few words, you might have noticed that, (joking) so we get a lot said in a few conversations a week. On the challenge of evaluating a head coach with a young roster… My brother said early in the spring to not judge the team on wins and losses, but it’s progression and I agree with that. I think it’s going to be obvious to all if this team is progressing. There are so many young guys who, just because they aren’t bold-faced names, doesn’t mean they aren’t really talented. I think that we have a group of coaches, including Todd, who are really good at building those players up and teaching the roles these young players have to fill. I think you’re going to see a lot of progression, but it’s going to be obvious. You guys will probably let me know, but I think it will be obvious to all. On the narrative that the 2017 Jets are tanking to get a quarterback in 2018… It couldn’t be further from the truth. I want to win every game. Every player in that locker room wants to win and what you’re seeing I think are growing pains. These are young guys. There are some older guys on the team. Some of them, they’re doing an extraordinary job, but I think you’re going to see this team get better and better and better. That’s what I am looking for and we are definitely not tanking. On Maccagnan and Bowles… Let’s start with Mike. I think he’s proven over the years before he got here, that he is an extraordinary talent evaluator and I’ve seen nothing to dissuade me from that here. I think he’s very thoughtful, he’s very methodical and I’m really impressed with his drafts and his outlook. With Todd, much the same. I’ve been around a lot of coaches at this point. He has a connection with the players that maybe does not show up with you guys, but I’m in the locker room, I’m at the practices, I see him working with these young men and I think he strikes the right balance of really everything. I’m really impressed with him. On Maccagnan picking a quarterback in the second round last year who is now third on the depth chart… First of all, the quarterback position is really difficult to evaluate and we haven’t really seen where Christian (Hackenberg) might go. I’m really more about looking forward than looking back. Everybody is going to look back and find places where things have gone wrong. I don’t think that you can say that about Christian. I think that he has a lot of upside and I hope to see it. On whether there is any concern about fan apathy… I hope that the fans will buy into our plan and I’m looking forward to seeing growth. I’m extraordinarily excited about seeing the development of our young players, especially. I think that they’re going to see this team grow before their eyes. I think that that’s exciting. I can’t say whether they’re going to stay home, but I hope they don’t. I think it’s going to be an exciting season. I can’t wait for this first home game. On his thoughts about the Jets run defense thus far… A lot of mistakes. A lot of mistakes were made, but mistakes you can fix. That’s one thing I’m really looking forward to seeing fixed. On if he can guarantee that some players will fix their mistakes… Unlike (Joe) Namath, I’m not in the guaranteeing business, but I think you can count on things getting better there. On the current direction of the Jets and if it will require patience from him… I’m not a patient man. I’m like any fan – I’ve been a fan of this team all my life. Yes, you can look long term, but I want to see this team progressing every game. I’m not happy with losses, I’m not happy with mistakes, but I’m excited about the progression. On his biggest challenge in his current role with the Jets… What I really want to see happen is for us to go to the Super Bowl. I promised my brother I’d leave him two tickets at will call (laughter), because every little brother wants to show up his bigger brother. The biggest challenge is to earn the trust of the fans, to have them know that I care about this team deeply and I’m going to do everything I can to make it a great team again. On whether the general manager and head coach will continue to report directly to him… Nothing has changed from my brother’s approach to mine. On why the team waited until Maccagnan and Bowles’ third year to re-tool and get younger… That’s a good question. It’s hard to look back. Sometimes you can look back and things look really clear, but a couple of years ago we had a pretty good run there. It seemed like we had unlocked some of the keys to moving forward. What our plan is now, I think is a good one, and I think it’s the way to bring us forward. I just can’t look back and criticize that too heavily. On when he believes the Jets should be a playoff team… I have no date in mind. I can’t speculate on that. On the Jets loss versus the Raiders… It was lopsided in the end, but I think that there were some great things in that game. Like I said, I look for progression in all aspects of play on the field, and I think that our offense – you guys might not have been impressed – but I thought that some great things happened in our offensive play. There were a handful of things that were great on defense – Jamal Adams’ tackle of (Marshawn) Lynch, that goal line tackle was one of the great plays I can ever recall. I want to see more of that. I want to see a lot more of that, but I hate losses as much as anybody else does. On if he will judge Bowles on wins and losses this season… No. Believe me, like any fan I like wins a lot more than losses, but that’s only part of the equation. The real way to judge this team and the people on it, me included, are we getting better? On if he could foresee a situation where the team loses a lot of games and Bowles retains his job… It’s not going to come down to games. It really won’t. It’s more about the play on the field. Are we getting better? Believe me, losses hurt deeply. I like wins a lot more, but it’s not going to be the sole or even a really important way for me to judge Todd or Mike. On if he will evaluate Bowles and Maccagnan similar to how the Jets will evaluate players at the end of the season… I’ll evaluate everyone, including myself, but it’s not going to depend on wins and losses in my mind. On if players need to be replaced when they are not performing well or if they should stay on the field and grow on the job if they are younger players… That’s going to be up to the Coach. That’s really going to be up to the Coach and Mike. I’m not yet Jerry Jones (laughter). On why Woody accepted the ambassadorship to the U.K. and stepped away from the Jets… I think you know that my brother has tried to serve his community over the years. That’s been a big part of his life is raising money for medical research and working on his community. This is his chance to serve the country, which he cares for very deeply, and he has an extraordinary job. I’m really, immensely proud of my brother. The U.K. is our most important ally, and this is probably the most interesting time in the U.K. – U.S. relationship since World War II, so it’s an immense job. I couldn’t be more proud of him and it doesn’t surprise me in the least that he would say to me it’s your team, don’t mess it up. On if that is what Woody said to him… Yes, he did (laughter). On if has any indication of how long he will serve as Chairman and CEO… When (Woody) comes back, he’ll take over again, and I’m not entirely sure about how long that is. So I’m going to make the most of it while I’m here. On NFL owners he has spoken to for advice… I’ve been talking with owners and soliciting their advice for the last several months, but I don’t think I’ll go into exactly who. Click here to read the full story...
  4. The New York Jets were on the road the first two weeks and they play their first home game on Sunday against the Miami Dolphins. When you are looking for your first win of the season, it is all hands on deck. But the injury list is getting a little longer. Here is the recap that coach Bowles gave after practice on Wednesday. Freddie Bishop did not practice, ankle. Brain Winters did not practice, abdomen. (Eric) Tomlinson did not practice, elbow. (Jordan) Leggett did not practice, knee. (Muhammad) Wilkerson did not practice, shoulder. (Jonotthan) Harrison did not practice, concussion. (Neal) Sterling did not practice, knee. Robby Anderson did not practice, knee. Rontez Miles was limited. No injured players are ruled out for Sunday. When it comes to Wilkerson, head coach Todd Bowles didn’t provide a ton of information. Saying it is sore, and we will see how the week goes. He wouldn’t even confirm when Wilkerson got hurt, saying “I’m assuming he hurt it in the game.”. No definitive word on Robby Anderson either. Bowles did confirm that neither player underwent an MRI, so that is good news. Austin Seferian-Jenkins is eligible to return to the active roster this week and he did return to practice. When asked if Jenkins would be active on Sunday Bowles also indicated it was too early in the week to make that decision. This quote was a little concerning though. He has to get in a little better shape. (That’s) to be expected after two weeks off, but he’ll get going. Here is the full injury report. Click here to read the full story...
  5. Thanks for joining us in our weekly film review articles. In this one, we will review the mistakes made by Josh McCown and company, against the Raiders. The Jets, overall, employed a conservative game plan, which limited the mistakes. Although, that isn’t to say there weren’t missed opportunities. 1) Josh McCown has space in the pocket to move, and receivers open down the field. Most notably, Robby Anderson is flying down the field with inside leverage, and assured to run right by the safety. However, Josh McCown doesn’t pull the trigger on the deep pass. Nevertheless, Jeremy Kerley and Jermaine Kearse are also open on this play in the intermediate area, but McCown runs to the sideline to summon the punting team. Notice that the tight end on this play apparently doesn’t have any idea of the snap count, because he’s looking back towards the QB, after the ball is snapped. This should have been a completed pass for a first down, because there are three options available to the quarterback, and they aren’t utilized. If it’s a incomplete pass to Anderson, at least the Jets are taking a shot down the field, which keeps the defense honest. In the worst case scenario, if it’s an interception, it functions similar to a punt. This method of conservative play looks acceptable in the box score, but the Jets won’t be a consistent offense without giving defenses a reason to cover the whole field. 2) This is a great play by Gareon Conley as he swats away the ball like a legal case. The missed opportunity stems from the bad throw by Josh McCown here, and a bad decision. The Jets have (Presumably Robby Anderson) on the right side of the formation with inside leverage on a deep route, and McCown moves on from the read to throw to Kearse. The decision is acceptable because Kearse has a step on Conley, but the throw is horrible because it’s thrown behind the receiver. Back shoulder throws work out better if they don’t give the defender time to recover, but in this case, the ball is lobbed behind the target. The corner back has enough time to recover and make a play on the ball. McCown should have led Kearse with this pass, or thrown a stronger pass without as much loft. If McCown feared Conley with the inside position, then the pass should have gone to Anderson on the other sideline. Brandon Shell absolutely gets abused on this play, but the defender is picked up by Bilal Powell, allowing McCown enough time to get this pass off. 3) This is a 3rd and 9 play in Oakland territory, and the Jets get conservative. McCown has Robby Anderson for a pass, another receiver for a short pass, or the running back out of the back field, but takes the sack instead. McCown does a good job in moving up in the pocket on this play, but he has to pull the trigger on this pass to Anderson or the secondary receiver. After the sack, gambling extraordinaire Todd Bowles decided to punt the ball, which gained a grand total of 28 yards. 4) This is a conversion for a first down, one which withstood a challenge by the Raiders. However, this is a horrible play because the Raiders are rushing three and Josh McCown could create a plethora of opportunities by stepping up in the pocket. He has enough space to move up, which would then cause the linebackers to either commit to the zone, or abandon it, allowing guys to be open. Both Robby Anderson and Will Tye had a chance to be open if the play is extended by McCown moving up in the pocket. Charone Peake doesn’t do himself any favors with this route, but he makes a nice catch and barely gets enough yards for the conversion. 5) This play probably reminds Anderson of playing with Fitzpatrick. Robby Anderson runs by his defender and has at least a step and soon to be more, when Josh McCown under throws the ball for an incomplete pass. The concept on this play is great because it’s set up to succeed. Jeremy Kerley is running the deep in route, which is supposed to take away the outside defender and the single high safety. If the safety or the outside corner back doesn’t stay with Kerley, then he’s wide open for a pass. Once the safety is occupied, Anderson has a one on one match up with a wheel route, allowing him to run by the defender. Once the safety, outside defender, and the defender on Anderson are out of the way, then it clears the way for Kearse’s route cutting across the field. Then notice the TE running behind Kearse also running a deeper slant route. All of these routes are timed perfectly, giving the QB multiple options. Unfortunately, McCown makes a horrible throw and wastes this opportunity. On the bright side, this is a great play design by the offensive coordinator. 6) This is a terrible throw by McCown as he missed Elijah McGuire with the throw and it falls incomplete. There is no excuse for missing this pass, it should be an easy pass to the running back. On a positive note, notice how McGuire sets up the defender with a step inside, before bouncing out. The step throws the linebacker off balance, which allows just enough time to create separation. This is one of the biggest reasons why pass catching running backs are a big weapon in spread offenses, because the linebacker in this scenario has to protect the inside slant route and the outside out route as well. Therefore, if a running back can hide his route until the last minute, it’s bound to be successful more times than not. Although, all the route concealers in the world won’t help if the QB can’t hit the receiver. 7) The Jets fumble on this play, and once again the Raiders create pressure by rushing a minimum amount of people. On this play, only three players rush the QB, yet they get a sack with strip fumble. If Josh McCown steps up in the pocket, then Robby Anderson is going to be open down the middle of the field for a long pass, but McCown remains static in the pocket. While Josh McCown is a pocket passer and hardly a runner, he has to consistently move up in the pocket when the defense rushes three or in a four wide formation. He doesn’t have the arm strength nor accuracy to negate the numbers disadvantage down the field without forcing the hand of the defense. If the QB starts to move up, it forces the linebackers to move up or stay put, which opens up routes for receivers. Admittedly, McCown showed a better ability to move up in the pocket in this game than the previous week, but he still fell victim to staying in the pocket, when he should have stepped up. Conclusion: This is a rather short article, because there aren’t THAT many mistakes. The Jets played somewhat conservative, and it helped keep the mistakes down. There were a few opportunities squandered, and some inconsequential plays that didn’t make any of our articles. The Jets are playing not to make mistakes, instead of taking risks to score, which is a fine strategy if you have a world class defense. Unfortunately, our defense is a major liability as well, so the conservative playing style isn’t going to get us anywhere this season. On the other hand, Josh Rosen/Sam Darnold (Enter your favorite college QB here) could be around the corner, so winning may not be a priority. Score: C+ Josh McCown made some nice plays, while squandering some opportunities. The conservative nature of the offense limits the potential to score points consistently. Forum Questions: A) How would a running QB help this offense? Click here to read the full story...
  6. Here is our NFL DFS recap for the week. Be sure to check out All Fantasy Sports Picks for lineup advice and Premium NFL Lineups. Now on to the week three information. Lots of injuries to follow this week. Be sure to check out the JetNation League on FanDuel. $900 in prize money this week, $10 to enter. Rob Gronkowski- Week to Week Jordy Nelson – Day to Day- If he sits use Adams Greg Olsen – Out 10-12 Weeks- use Ed Dickson Jimmy Graham – Day to day- if out use Luke Wilson Jordan Reed – Day to day- if out use Veron Davis Demarco Murray- Hamstring- Week to Week, if he sits use Derrick Henry Sam Bradford- Knee Bone Contusion- Week to week Jordan Howard- shoulder Injury- Day to Day- Use Cohen Randall Cobb- Shoulder- Day to Day- Use Adams and Geronimo Allison Cam Newton- Ankle sprain- Day to day Let’s get to the Quarterbacks: 5 Stars: Tom Brady- cash and gpps Aaron Rodgers- cash and gpps Derek Carr- gpps 4 Stars: Matt Ryan- cash Carson Wentz- cash Trevor Sieman- cash and gpps 3 Stars: Drew Brees- gpps Jamis Winston- gpps and is my sleeper this week for large gpps Ben Roethlisberger- gpps Running Backs: Ty Montgomery, Jay Ajayi, Le’voen Bell, Melvin Gordon, Tarik Cohen, AJ Anderson- cash contests Leonard Fournette, Devonta Freeman, Kareem Hunt, Lesean MCcoy- gpp contests Wide Receivers: Golden Tate, Jarvis Landry, Keenan Allen, Doug Baldwin, Julio Jones and Antonino Brown- cash plays Julio Jones, Antonino Brown, Michael Thomas, Michael Crabtree, Alshon Jeffery, AJ Green – gpps Kickers: I look for the highest projected scoring teams that are going to be close. The I narrow this down by looking for games playing under a dome so weather is not a factor. Defense: Philadelphia Eagles (vs. New York Giants) Philadelphia isn’t a place you want to go if you have issues in pass protection. That’s a troubling reality for a Giants team that’s allowed eight sacks in two games, regardless of whether you want to pin the results on Eli Manning or his offensive line. Manning has also thrown a pair of picks while completing just four passes of 20-plus yards, and the running game has squeaked out 97 yards on 30 carries. Even with a healthier version of Odell Beckom the Giants are in real danger of fielding a bottom-five offense this season. Miami Dolphins (at New York Jets) New York Jets have mostly been as advertised through two weeks, getting outscored 66-32. The only reason I’m not higher on Miami’s prospects is that the Jets have deployed an extremely conservative passing game, which limits the opportunities for opponents to come up with turnovers Josh MCcown completed 67.2 percent of his passes for 5.5 yards per attempt — a stat line that suggests the Jets are trying to avoid embarrassment rather than taking an earnest shot at winning. Hurts when I write this but it’s true. Green Bay Packers (vs. Cincinnati Bengals The Green Bay defense figures to get back on track in a matchup with a Cincinnati offense that arguably has been the league’s worst unit through two weeks (with apologies to the Saints’ defense). After turning the ball over five times against Baltimore in their opener, the Bengals managed just nine points Week 2versus Houston. Andy Dalton has already been sacked eight times while playing behind a line that lost its two best players in the offseason. The Green Bay defense is far from spectacular and can easily be exploited by wide receivers, but the unit is typically a strong fantasy option at home, where it often benefits from Aron Rodgers ability to produce early leads. Andy Dalton likely will be in for a long day if the Packers’ defense is able to pin its ears back and disregard the run. As a bonus, Green Bay makes for an excellent two-week streamer, facing the Bears at Lambeau Field next Thursday. Tennessee Titans (vs. Seattle Seahawks) With their long-standing struggles on the offensive line seemingly at a nadir, the Seahawks no longer profile as a difficult matchup for opposing defenses. They’ve allowed six sacks and produced just 21 points through two weeks, though Russell Wilson does at least get some credit for keeping the team in games by avoiding turnovers. Of course, I expect that to change this week against a Tennessee team that should put up some points against Seattle’s excellent defense. Wilson isn’t the problem, but there’s not much he’ll be able to do if he’s facing a multi-score deficit behind that line, particularly if Jimmy Graham (ankle/knee) is unavailable. The Tennessee defense is a middling unit on paper, but it’s seemingly good enough to take advantage of favorable matchups, as was the case in Jacksonville (two sacks, three takeaways) on Sunday. An ugly Week 1 showing against the Raiders should seem like the distant past by the team Seattle leaves town. The Titans also have appeal beyond Sunday, heading to Houston in Week 4 and later playing the Colts (Week 6) and Browns (Week 7). Stuck in between is a sub-optimal Week 5 matchup in Miami. Games I am going to focus on: Steelers at Bears Miami at Jets Bengals at Green Bay Oakland at Washington Here is a sample lineup I would use on Fan Duel if I was going to play a 50-50. Wentz Ty Montgomery Marshawn Lynch A.J. Green Golden Tate Keenen Allen Zach Ertz Matt Bryant New England Pats If you play 50-50s play the single-entry ones. This way you do not have to worry about someone putting in 100 lineups in that contest. Click here to read the full story...
  7. The Jets, predictably, lost for the second time this year in as many weeks. The Oakland Raiders covered their betting spread, and then some, while the Jets looked hapless on defense, and lethargic on offense. Josh McCown again had a game of conservatism, although the play book was opened up for some deep passes this time, which is a move in the right direction (as long as those passes are caught by the receivers). This is another week where McCown tried to limit the risks as much as possible, and played mediocre football. This article is going to be longer than the “McFrown” article to follow, mainly because the game plan was limited and McCown didn’t take enough risks to compile bad throws. Let us examine this week’s performance: 1) This is a good play action pass from McCown to Robby Anderson. that goes for 19 yards. The Raiders have stacked the box with eight defenders, which means they are expecting the Jets to run the ball, and the play action brings the linebackers toward the line of scrimmage. The defender on Robby Anderson is giving ample space for a slant route, and Anderson takes advantage of the free space. McCown does a good job of hitting him in stride, allowing him to get yards after the catch. The other receiver on this play, Chad Hansen, is acting as the clear out, but notice the angle of his route. He’s slowly but surely running towards the single high safety, because that is what makes this crossing route work. If the safety jumps the throw to Anderson, then this play is dangerous. However, Hansen engages the safety by shading towards his lane as much as possible, thus taking up two defenders. It’s a small detail in play set up (most likely a coach’s decision) but it makes a huge difference on this play. Very good throw from McCown, and good yards after the catch from Anderson. 2) This play is important to remember for this game and future games, because it’s a second and four situation. The Raiders essentially create pressure by rushing four, because they communicate extremely well on this play. Elijah McGuire started out in the backfield on this play, and then motioned to the slot. The Raiders reacted by moving the linebackers towards that side, but also communicating with the defensive tackle. The defense sent a safety blitz, leaving them with single high safety in the middle. With this type of blitz, the Elijah McGuire route is the hot route because the slot linebacker has to protect both sides of a possible route by the running back. When McGuire cuts to the inside, he should be open, but notice the defensive tackle drop back into coverage to prevent the hot route. McCown does a good job getting this pass to Neal Sterling, who does an exceptional job at catching it. Why do defenses do this? Two reasons. One, they are daring Josh McCown to step up in the pocket and run with the ball (He does later in the article, and we saw it plenty with Fitzpatrick last year). Two, they are daring the Jets to pass the ball deep in this case, because there is one on one match-ups with deep routes on the left side of the formation, but those won’t develop unless the QB steps up in the pocket. In this case, McCown doesn’t step up to his left side and take a shot deep, but goes for the safer option in Sterling, although he’s well covered. Defenses are able to create this type of pressure, because they are banking on the Jets avoiding the deep pass and stepping up in the pocket. 3) We blame McCown for not stepping up in the pocket, so he at least heeds our advise and moves around in the pocket on this play. The bad part about this play is that McCown is staring down Jermaine Kearse, and only moves on when he realizes that there is no window. However, McCown moves around to the left side of the pocket and creates a passing lane by running towards his receivers. This is a simple pass for about 4 yards, but it was accomplished only because McCown moved from the pocket. Robby Anderson could have helped out his QB a bit more by running up the field on this play because he had a chance to be open, and by moving up field, brings along defenders. If this throw was perfectly on target, Tye stands a better chance of breaking a tackle against one defender, rather than the defender on Anderson being in the same area as well. Unfortunately, these are some of the downsides of pairing quarterbacks and receivers new to the system because they aren’t on the same page. It’s a very positive play by McCown, decent throw and good catch by Tye. 4) This play is only in the good section because it has an OK result. However, this is the epitome of conservatism by Josh McCown and the Jets. McCown takes the safe route in throwing this pass to Matt Forte, because Kearse is somewhat covered on this play. However, the Jets have (Looks like ArDarius Stewart- hard to tell) a receiver running down the field with inside leverage and the safety is not in position to impact the play. This play screams for a deep pass because the receiver has inside position, and no one across from him, so the QB can lead him over the middle. The pocket is clean as well, but McCown elects to make the check-down pass. The Jets have to take shots downfield in situations like this because they can’t afford to check down consistently and expect to score. 5) This is the broadcast angle, because this play was not included in the All-22 film angle for unknown reasons. This play is why Jermaine Kearse should be on the team next year. The Jets have set up shallow crossing routes on this play for the check-down, but McCown takes a deep shot and gets rewarded on this play. The first thing to notice is that Amerson is set up to have outside leverage on this play, which indicates that he wants to funnel the receiver towards the middle of the field, where there is a safety. Kearse takes a wide step off the line of scrimmage (and presumably) gains separation. What makes this play great is the high point catch by the receiver, which is something rarely seen from the Jets. The Seahawks have one of the best systems in the game in teaching their receivers fundamentals and Kearse is a good example of it. It is also a great throw by McCown, placing it perfectly out of the reach from the corner back. 6) Last week we saw Matt Forte lined up on the outside, running go routes with no avail. On this play, he’s lined up outside, but runs a slant instead for a decent gain. This is a good read and adjustment because it’s a late audible by McCown. Forte was matched up against a corner back, but the defense made a switch to a linebacker. The corner back had Forte played well because he gave him space, but retained the ability to look at the QB, which allowed him to break on any inside routes. The linebacker, on the other hand, sets up this play with inside leverage, and no line of sight towards the QB, which allows Forte to break inside and gain separation. McCown and Forte recognize the mistake from the linebacker and promptly take advantage, whereas the Bills played this much better last week. This is more of a mistake by the defense, but it’s a good play for the Jets to recognize and take advantage. 7) The Raiders were daring McCown to leave the pocket and gain yards, and the Jets oblige. There is wide open space to the left of the formation, and McCown recognizes it and takes advantage. As with anything Jets related, it can’t be all positive because Bilal Powell is wide open for a pass from McCown as he’s running (prior to crossing the line of scrimmage) but the QB does not pull the trigger. This is a pass that could lead to a big gain because Powell is much more likely to break a tackle than McCown, but he takes the conservative route. Although since Rome wasn’t built in a day, these are baby steps for the Jets and moving outside of the pocket is just step one in creating problems for opposing defenses. 8) Pocket movement galore! Josh McCown channeled his inner Fitzpatrick and slowly rushed up the middle for a sizable gain. The Jets have seen these types of rushes from Fitzpatrick in the last two years, and McCown follows suit here. A good job by blocking downfield as well, but overall a very good run by McCown. 9) Josh McCown has apparently been watching tapes of Lamar Jackson, because now he’s running around the pocket every chance he gets. Once McCown is out of the pocket, he has two choices in passing to Kearse or Anderson, and he chooses the right option by passing to Anderson, who gains some yards after the catch, and then mistakes the first down marker official for a police officer. 10) The defense only rushes three on this play, and Josh McCown, once again, decides to run outside of the pocket, and finds success. This time the QB runs to the right side of the formation, and hits a cutting Jermaine Kearse for a sizable gain. It’s a nice throw from McCown which leads Kearse to get some yards after the catch. We’ve been saying it over and over again, but the best way to find success against defenses that rush 4 wide or 3 is to move around because the defense will have to adjust on the fly. 11) Fan favorite Jeremy Kerley makes an appearance by catching this pass for a first down. There isn’t anything special about this play, Kerley does a good job of settling in the hole against a zone defense, and McCown does a good job of hitting him. The play is actually set up by Forte, because the linebackers move up to take away the check down to Forte, which opens up the hole for Kerley. If you are the Jets offensive coordinator, you keep this play and defense in the back of your mind because Robby Anderson has a shot at running up the field, if the play called for it. The play is designed to be a quick one, since it’s 3rd down, but this is something to keep in mind for the future, if they can call a deep route as an audible on this play. 12) This play is in normal speed, just to throw off the readers, because writing about the Jets offense can get tiresome. It’s a good throw by McCown, on a comeback route by Kearse. The play highlights that McCown is more comfortable with Kearse than Anderson, because they both run mirror routes, and Anderson is set up better because the defender is playing well off the line of scrimmage. McCown looks towards Anderson, and then goes to Kearse with the tougher match up, but the receiver makes the catch anyway. 13) This is a great example of the coaches setting up a pass play designed to succeed based on the defense. Matt Forte is lined up in the slot, right behind Jermaine Kearse. The defense is set up with a defender near Kearse, and a corner back/safety about five yards off the line. When the play goes in motion, the QB is reading the release from Kearse, because it’s his release that sets up this play. If Kearse gets a free release, which means the defender directly next to him, cleanly disengages towards Forte, then Kearse is the primary target. In that scenario, he has a clean release, running a slant route against a defender playing back without over the top safety help. If Kearse doesn’t get a clean release, then the defender closest to Forte is essentially picked on this play, and thus slowed down, which opens up the running back for the pass. Forte is open for the pass, McCown does a good job of hitting him in stride, which allows him to get some yards after the catch. 14) The final TD pass from McCown, and it’s once again an example of Kearse going up to catch the ball at it’s high point. The Raiders bring a blitz, leaving one on one coverage on everyone, and McCown makes a great throw. The quarterback is in the windup, before Kearse is even making his break, and throws this pass perfectly towards the receiver. Kearse goes up and gets the ball for the TD. Notice the step by Kearse, right before the break inside because he does it to keep the corner back from guessing the route. When he makes the step towards the outside, the corner back has to respect the outside fade route just enough to allow space inside. It’s a great set up by the receiver and a great throw by McCown. Conclusion: While McCown did have his moments, especially when throwing to Kearse, the overall game plan was still conservative. He did shown better mobility within the pocket and outside, and the Jets need to incorporate more deep routes into the playbook to keep defenses honest. Overall, an average to below average game for McCown. Please check back with us later for the “McFrown” article. Forum Questions: A) If Kearse was a free agent after the year, would you resign him, and for how much? Click here to read the full story...
  8. On this episode of JetNation Radio the guys will be discussing everything from the Jets week two loss in Oakland. Who stood out in both a negative and in a positive way? What were some of the story lines coming out of this game? Next up is the home opener against the Miami Dolphins so that will be another topic of discussion. Be sure to follow us on Twitter @JetNationRadio. Click here to read the full story...
  9. Tom Pelissero of NFL Network is reporting that the Jets have auditioned multiple receivers and a defensive lineman. The Jets auditioned defensive lineman Datone Jones and wide receivers Philly Brown, Josh Huff and Paul Turner. After waiving return man Kalif Raymond and adding defensive lineman Claude Pelon, another move is likely on the horizon as their practice squad currently stands at nine players, and they may look to elevate a return man such as Marcus Murphy or JoJo Natson. Click here to read the full story...
  10. In a move that will come as a surprise to absolutely nobody, the Jets have waived wide receiver/return man Kalif Raymond. In two games, Raymond has mishandled three punts, one of which took away the Jets momentum in a comeback attempt last week versus the Oakland Raiders. Pelon, who had two tackles in the team’s season opening loss, will take up one of the team’s ten practice squad slots. Click here to read the full story...
  11. Our FanDuel league is back again this week. Here are the details: $900 in total prize money. $250 to the winner. $10 to enter. Remember this is a one week league, pick your lineup against the salary cap and next week if you want to play again you can pick a completely different lineup if you want. Click this link to enter — http://fanduel.com/JetNation Click here to read the full story...
  12. The New York Jets locker room may have been located in the state of California yesterday, but judging by comments made by defensive lineman Muhammad Wilkerson after the game, it would appear the Jets locker room, or at least Wilkerson, is in a state of denial. On a day in which head coach Todd Bowles watched his defense get beat on the ground and through the air to the tune of 410 total yards (180 on the ground) and 45 points, Rich Cimini of ESPN New York reported that Wilkerson responded to questions about the team’s performance by saying that the defensive line “responded really good” to being called out by Bowles after a lackluster performance in Buffalo one week before. Through the season’s first two games, Mo Wilkerson has 4 tackles and no sacks. Yes, you read that right. Muhammad Wilkerson, who has been invisible through the season’s first two games despite an $18 million a year contract, feels that the team’s defensive line responded well to criticism for under-performing in the team’s season opener. Aside from playing a huge role in being gashed for 180 yards on the ground, how many sacks did the defensive line produce, you ask? Zero. How often was Derek Carr pressured? Well, we counted one on a play that saw Wilkerson go unblocked, but other than that, you’d be generous to say they came away with a half-dozen. Todd Bowles was thought to have entered this season on solid footing as long as his team played hard every Sunday and looked prepared. We’re only two games in, but if this team is going to continue to play like this, Bowles can ill afford to have players like Wilkerson (or anyone else) saying that the team bounced back or “responded really good” from giving up half as many points the week before. Time for a reality check, Mo. This team didn’t play well at all. Minus a handful of individual players, the defense was a complete mess. If it doesn’t get better soon, Wilkerson may not be in a state of denial next season, but he certainly won’t be playing his home games in the state of New Jersey. Click here to read the full story...
  13. There’s no doubt that after an embarrassing 45-20 loss to the Oakland Raiders yesterday, there are some Jets fans looking to throw out the baby with the bath water and turn a blind eye to any positives that may come from this and any other loss this season. That doesn’t mean there weren’t some positives to be taken away from the loss, and we’re happy to highlight a few of those here. Jamal Adams had another solid outing for Gang Green in week two. S Jamal Adams: Despite playing over 50 snaps on defense, the Raiders passing game didn’t target Adams all day, and he appears to have shaken his tackling issues that plagued him during the pre-season. It wasn’t going to take long for teams to respect Adams’ explosive first step and quickness against underneath routes. Adams and fellow rookie Marcus Maye earned high praise from PFF.com. S JAMAL ADAMS, 83.0 OVERALL GRADE, S MARCUS MAYE, 81.4 OVERALL GRADE There isn’t much to cheer for Jets fans right now but their young safety duo are off to a bright start, and even playing behind a defensive front that was overpowered by the opposing offensive line couldn’t hide that. Both Adams and Maye came up to make stops against run and pass with Maye leading the way with 3 stops after Adams picked up a pair a week ago. Both made their best plays working downhill towards runs and short passes but in what looks likely to be a dark season, Adams and Maye offer a spark of optimism for the future. RT Brandon Shell: Second-year right tackle Brandon Shell had the toughest assignment on the day. In facing arguably the best pass rusher in the NFL in Khalil Mack, Shell more than held his own. Mack’s lone sack came on a rush away from Shell. LG James Carpenter: The Jets were finally able to get their running backs going (21 carries, 96 yards) and the interior lineman were a big part of than, namely Carpenter, Brian Winters and Dakota Dozier. Carpenter’s performance earned him a team high PFF grade of 83.4. WR Jermaine Kearse: It’s probably time for Kearse to no longer be viewed as a “throw in” from the trade that sent Sheldon Richrdson to the Seattle Seahawks. Kearse had a garbage time TD yesterday, but also had one in the second half on a play that looked to have a chance to change the momentum in the contest. With so little time in the Jets offense, you can’t help but admire what Kearse has done in such a short time. RG Dakota Dozier: Dozier stepped in for an injured Brian Winters and the offense looked to find some rhythm in the running game, with several good runs going right behind Dozier. Rather than being a liability as a back up lineman, Dozier has played well when called upon as he was late last season and again yesterday. RB Elijah McGuire: After spending all of last week on the pine, McGuire got some run against the Raiders and looked impressive, carrying the ball 6 time for 29 yards. McGuire also had a reception for 7 yards. A modest stat line, but an encouraging sign after a strong pre-season. McGuire will likely emerge as the biggest steal of this class for the Jets. As has been stated many times over, this season is more about player development than wins and losses, and it looks like the Jets have a few youngsters who are coming along, but there’s still a looong way to go. Click here to read the full story...
  14. Week 2 Report Card: Jets @ Raiders L 45-20 Quarterback: C Josh McCown: 17/25 166 yards, 2 TD 0 INT, 1 fumble The offense actually showed some life in the first half, and in particular the 34-yard touchdown pass to Jermaine Kearse gave the Jets a boost in momentum. That was all erased by a muffed punt from Kalif Raymond, setting up the go ahead touchdown for the Raiders at the end of the half. It was all down hill from there. McCown failed to hit a couple of wide open receivers, took too many sacks, and fumbled once on a strip sack. Other than that, he played a decent game. Running back: C Matt Forte: 9 rushes for 53 yards, 4 receptions for 38 yards Elijah McGuire: 6 rushes for 29 yards, 1 reception for 7 yards Bilal Powell: 6 rushes for 13 yards Josh McCown: 4 rushes for 31 yards The Jets actually surpassed the 100-yard rushing mark, although no running back had more than nine touches. It looks like the Jets may begin using a three-man running back committee by including Elijah McGuire in the rotation. All things considered, the run game made strides compared to last week. Wide Receiver/Tight End: C Jermaine Kearse: 4 receptions for 64 yards, 2 TD Robby Anderson: 2 receptions for 28 yards Jeremy Kerley: 3 receptions for 14 yards Charone Peake: 1 reception for 3 yards Neal Sterling: 1 reception for 8 yards Will Tye: 1 reception for 4 yards Jermaine Kearse continues to be the only consistent play maker on the Jets’ offense. With a pedestrian wide receiver group, this will likely be the case for the season. Robby Anderson has struggled to make an impact so far, putting even more pressure on Kearse to produce. Offensive Line: B Considering they were playing the likes of Khalil Mack, Bruce Irvin, etc. the offensive line did a commendable job. They did a better job opening holes for the run game, and a decent job in pass protection. Josh McCown was sacked four times, but at least two of them were due to McCown trying to scramble out of the pocket. Defensive Line: F For the second straight week the defensive line was manhandled. The supposed strength of the team has been a glaring weakness so far this season. The run defense has been putrid giving up 370 yards in two games, while the pass rush is nearly nonexistent. Linebacker: F The inexperience and lack of talent is obvious in the linebacker department. Blown coverages, missed tackles, and terrible play recognition are abundant so far with this group. Not to mention the absence of a pure pass rusher. Secondary: F The only player in the secondary that wasn’t terrible today was Jamal Adams, who is showing promise by improving his tackling technique and usually finding himself near the ball. Derek Carr had a field day completing 82% of his passes, while throwing for 230 yards and three touchdowns. The secondary made Michael Crabtree look like Antonio Brown. Special Teams: D- This could have easily been a B grade if it weren’t for Raymond’s muffed punt. Chandler Catanzaro has been a pleasant surprise in the kicking game, he’s 4/4 so far this season. Lachlan Edwards has done a decent job punting so far as well. Coaching: C- The offensive game plan was more palatable this week, with offensive coordinator John Morton being more aggressive downfield and mixing in more rushing plays. That being said, the decision to put Kalif Raymond back in the game after surrendering the momentum-altering fumble was a head scratcher to say the least. Raymond fumbled twice last week, making it three fumbles in two weeks. He should be cut tomorrow. Overall Grade: D- Click here to read the full story...
  15. After a week one loss, the Jets were looking to get in the win column against the Oakland Raiders at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum. Josh McCown got the start at quarterback, while Bryce Petty was the backup and Christian Hackenberg was inactive. After a 45-20 loss, this year’s Jets team is now the second since 2007 to lose their first two games of the season. Here’s the good, the bad and the ugly… THE GOOD The Jets came back from an early 14-0 deficit. WR Jermaine Kearse had 4 receptions for 64 yards and two touchdowns. (The last time a Jets WR did that on the road? 2007 – Laveranues Coles) K Chandler Catanzaro made two field goals with a long of 46. At the half, McCown was 8/11 for 82 yards and 1 touchdown. Recently acquired WR Jeremy Kerley did play and had 3 receptions for 14 yards. THE BAD It was another slow first quarter start for the offense. The team only had possession for 4:16 of the first quarter. The first quarter stat line had McCown with one pass completion for 19 yards and the running back committee with 2 yards rushing. The only player to have more than 1 reception at the half was RB Matt Forte. THE UGLY The Jets secondary was torched by Raiders QB Derek Carr and WR Michael Crabtree for three touchdowns. The defense gave up a 43-yard rushing touchdown to Cordarrelle Patterson and a 52-yard touchdown to Jalen Richard. A costly punt fumble by Kalif Raymond led to a Raider touchdown just before the half. The Jets offense had 271 total yards and gave up 4 sacks. The team was 5 for 47 in penalties. Brian Winters left the game with a groin injury. Inactive players included: S Rontez Miles, TE Eric Tominlinson, TE Jordan Leggett, CB Derrick Jones, LB Bruce Carter and C Jonotthan Harrison. Click here to read the full story...
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