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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/07/2018 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Absurd list. Literally the only reason Herm and Rex had an iota of “success” was because they inherited rosters on the upswing that Parcells and Mangini had to build up from from absolute zero.
  2. 3 points
    Ken Shroy

    July Madness sign up

    Im retired and a little bored, but I don't think Im that bored.
  3. 2 points
    Ranking Jets' all-time best, worst coaches | Where is Todd Bowles? Rex Ryan? Pete Carroll? jkj kj j By Darryl Slater | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com Who are the Jets' all-time best and worst head coaches? We'll attempt to settle that debate here, with a list that includes Todd Bowles, Rex Ryan, Bill Parcells, and others. Obviously, it is tough to compare coaches from different eras, so a lot of this list depends on how successful a particular coach was with the Jets — especially in the postseason. That's measurable, at least. Results like that count, even if the coach turned out to not be very good, either during or after his time with the Jets. WHO ISN'T ELIGIBLE FOR OUR LIST? We are only ranking full-time Jets head coaches, not interim coaches. So Ken Shipp (1-4 in 1975) and Mike Holovak (0-1 in 1976) don't make the list. 16. RICH KOTITE Total disaster of a hire, especially considering what Pete Carroll would go on to become after the Jets fired him. Kotite went 3-13 and 1-15 in his time with the Jets — 1995-96. He is widely considered one of the worst head coaches in NFL history. 15. LOU HOLTZ He was a highly successful college coach, but he couldn't translate that success to the NFL. The Jets went 3-11 in Holtz's lone season, 1976. Holtz was fired after a 3-10 start. Holtz's 10 losses were by the following margins — 21, 43, 16, 11, 34, 20, 20, 14, 17, and 21 points. 14. BULLDOG TURNER He coached the Jets (then in their final year as the Titans) for one season — 1962. That was his only year ever as a head coach. He went 5-9. So it's tough to slot him on this list. If you were wondering, his real name was Clyde Turner. 13. CHARLEY WINNER He didn't live up to his last name. Winner went 7-7 in his first season with the Jets (1974). He succeeded Weeb Ewbank that year. Big shoes. In 1975, Winner went 2-7 and then was fired before the season ended. 12. SAMMY BAUGH The franchise's first coach, Baugh went 7-7 with the Titans in both 1960 and 1961. Considering the Titans were an AFL expansion team in 1960, that's not too bad. So maybe he should be higher. But his short tenure makes it tough to move him up on our list. Baugh and Turner were the Titans' only coaches, in three years, before Ewbank took over in 1963, when the team became the Jets. 11. PETE CARROLL Remember, these rankings aren't based on what the coaches accomplished after they left the Jets. In Carroll's case, he thrived, and won a Super Bowl with the Seahawks. Rex Ryan, meanwhile, sputtered with the Bills for two seasons after the Jets fired him. But Carroll wasn't as successful with the Jets. Of course, he really didn't have much of a chance. He went 6-10 in his lone season, 1994, when he was a rookie head coach. And then he was fired. Bad move in retrospect, because he is a very good coach. He just wasn't a highly successful coach with the Jets, during his brief tenure. 10. TODD BOWLES Again, is Bowles a better coach than Carroll? No. Nobody would argue that. But Bowles did go 10-6 in his debut season with the Jets, 2015, when he was a rookie head coach. Bowles followed that with back-to-back, five-win seasons. 9. BRUCE COSLET He coached the Jets from 1990-93 and made the playoffs once, losing in a wildcard game in 1991. Coslet went 8-8 that year and in 1993. His other two seasons — 6-10 and 4-12. Nothing really all that spectacular about Coslet's time with the Jets. 8. AL GROH Another one-year coach here. Groh took over in 2000 after Bill Belichick bailed on the Jets and went to the Patriots. Groh bolted after the 2000 season and went to coach his alma mater, Virginia. He didn't make the playoffs with the Jets, but he did go 9-7. Not awful. Then again, the Jets that season started 6-1 (and then 9-4) before slipping out of the playoff picture. 7. ERIC MANGINI This is a tough one. We can hear an argument for putting Mangini ahead of Joe Walton. Was Mangini really given a fair shot with the Jets, in the final analysis? He won 10, four, and nine games from 2006-08. You have to wonder what might've happened if Brett Favre hadn't gotten hurt in 2008. Mangini lost in a wild-card game in 2006. So he never won a playoff game with the Jets. But during his tenure, the Jets drafted players (Nick Mangold, Darrelle Revis, David Harris, D'Brickashaw Ferguson) who would form the foundation of the 2009-10 back-to-back AFC Championship Game teams. 6. JOE WALTON Walton got seven seasons with the Jets (1983-89). He made the playoffs twice, in 1985 and 1986. And he won a playoff game in 1986, reaching the divisional round. Yes, he had more time than Mangini, but Walton did have more high points. He had three winning seasons — 11-5 in 1985, 10-6 in 1986, and 8-7-1 in 1988. His final regular season record with the Jets was 53-57-1 (.482 winning percentage), while Mangini went 23-25 (.479 winning percentage). The slight edge goes to Walton. 5. WALT MICHAELS Now we're in the top five, and you can start to guess some of these names that are coming. In six, post-Joe Namath seasons with the Jets (1977-82), Michaels had two playoff appearances, in his final two years. He lost in a wild-card game in 1981 and made the 1982 AFC Championship Game. Michaels abruptly resigned in early 1983, after that conference title game. But credit him for building the Jets back up after Namath's departure. Considering the Jets have played in the AFC title game just four times (not counting their Super Bowl III year), Michaels' trip to that game lands him in our top five. 4. HERM EDWARDS As with the Mangini vs. Walton debate, we wrestled with Edwards vs. Ryan. Edwards had three playoff trips in five seasons with the Jets. He won two playoff games, advancing to the divisional round in 2002 and 2004. Edwards' regular season record with the Jets was 39-41 (.488 winning percentage). 3. REX RYAN Look, the Jets had some very incompetent lows late in Ryan's tenure. He turned out to be just an average (or maybe even below average) NFL head coach, once he flopped in Buffalo. But the fact remains: Ryan took the Jets to back-to-back AFC title games in 2009 and 2010, his first two seasons. He was undoubtedly successful. Then things fell apart in his final four seasons. He went 46-50 in the regular season with the Jets (.479 winning percentage), but he'll always have those four playoff wins in 2009 and 2010 — two magical seasons for Jets fans. 2. BILL PARCELLS He put the Jets back together after the Kotite fiasco. And he did it quickly, winning nine, 12, and eight games in his three seasons as the Jets' coach, immediately after they won three and one under Kotite. Parcells is the best coach the Jets have ever employed, when you consider the totality of his career. Makes you wonder what might've happened if he continued coaching the Jets. The high point of his Jets tenure, of course, is his lone playoff appearance — the 12-4 of season of 1998, when the Jets reached the AFC title game. That remains the Jets' single-season record for wins. 1. WEEB EWBANK He built one of the most memorable teams in American sports history — the Super Bowl III champion — so we have to give Ewbank the No. 1 spot. He coached the Jets from 1963-73, and he made them matter in New York — along with Namath, of course. Ewbank's 1969 team could have repeated as champions, after a 10-4 regular season (following 11-3 in 1968). But the '69 Jets went one and done in the playoffs. Ewbank's career record with the Jets is 71-77-6 (.480 winning percentage), which isn't stellar. But he was the architect of the franchise's most successful team. So he gets the No. 1 spot.
  4. 2 points
    T0mShane

    Happy birthday, flgreen!

    Happy birthday, @flgreen
  5. 2 points
    How the hell is Edwards higher than Walt Michaels? Competition in the NFL in 1982 was incredible. That Raiders team the Jets beat in 82 was very good. Edwards single handedly lost that playoff game in Pittsburgh by turtleing like a little bitch at the end of that game!!! I still have visions of Chad taking a knee & losing 3 yards on 3rd down, ugh! Watching Pederson aggressively going after the Patriots makes you realize how this team has had so many conservative pussy coaches that froze like little bitches at the most important times of playoff games. But Herm takes the cake for those 2 drives & missed FGs. Had Herm not been involved in that crazy fumble recovery vs the Giants he wouldn't have been such a damn woosy. I'm positive he was remembering that moment & coached to not make a mistake than coaching to win that game!
  6. 2 points
    He became the most talented QB on the team the second he was drafted.
  7. 2 points
    Arguably the Seahawks, yeah the D won the first one, BUT if the Seahawks don’t have a brain fart, or whatever reason you believe they didn’t give it to Lynch he would have lead the way in that one. If you go back to the Cowboys first Super Bowl win in 1992, Aikman, Young, Favre, Elway, Warner, Brady, Big Ben, Peyton Manning, Eli Manning, Brees, Aaron Rodgers accounted for 21 of the 26 Super Bowl wins, and Russell Wilson might not get everyone’s respect as an elite QB, but he gets mine so it’s 22 out of 26 of the last Super Bowls won by HOF, and future HOF QB’s yes I will argue Wilson will end up in the HOF along with the others on the list that are not in the HOF yet. Dilfer, Johnson, Flacco, and Foles are the exceptions in the last 26 years, and Foles is kind of an asterisk guy as the probable MVP, player ranked #3 best player in the league by his peers in only his 2nd season drove that bus most the way so he is kind of a Hostetller type who got thrust into a situation that had destiny on its side like Jeff H. So yes the RB dominating, and carrying a team to a Super Bowl is probably the wrong way to try, and win a Super Bowl, and the main reason the Giants will look like fools in 3 years for passing on Darnold while us Jets fans get to reap the benefits of that with a sh*t eating grin!
  8. 2 points
    Great story, never heard this before
  9. 2 points
    Matt39

    Lebron rumors

  10. 2 points
    T0mShane

    Happy birthday, flgreen!

    A true JN OG who knows his stuff and has always brought good #content to the table. A real gentleman and a fine lady’s man.
  11. 2 points
    T0mShane

    July Madness sign up

    All time NFL Draft. Someone drafts Lawrence Taylor, then someone drafts Joe Montana, then someone drafts Dick Butkus, the 27Dominator drafts someone like Goose Gerstein from the 46 Cleveland HorseMooses and everybody goes “what” and then someone takes Jerry Rice.
  12. 2 points
    Got my Darnold jersey from the Jets shop today IT'S MINT got the tee shirt, love it as well.
  13. 2 points
  14. 2 points
    Jetster

    Jets Odds To Make The Playoffs.

    Jets always do better with low expectations than high ones, so 2018 will be one of those crazy seasons that shock everyone. I'm really surprised that people don't realize how average 90% off this leagues teams are. Last year the Jaguars lost to the Titans, Jets, Rams @ home, Cardinals, 49ers, Titans. Really? Anything can freaking happen in this league.
  15. 2 points
    Patriot Killa

    July Madness sign up

    *entire roster winds up being versatile box safeties.*
  16. 2 points
    Let him sit until Game-6. The three-game stretch in 10 days to start the season, followed by “Saxonville” in week 4 and DEN (w/ Chubb in tow) in week 5, make INDY (week 6) an ideal start. Let him watch & learn while the OL gels, and then let him play & learn, when the DL heat wears off some.
  17. 2 points
  18. 1 point
    Guaranteed Salary, Short Term Contract and Other CBA Ramblings Posted on July 4, 2018 by Jason Fitzgerald Earlier today Chargers offensive tackle Russell Okung posted a series of tweets regarding NFL contracts, the CBA, and guarantees and it was a pretty thought provoking series of tweets. We don’t often see players articulate these points so clearly in a public forum and it gave me some food for thought to write about. You can click on the link so you can read his own words but the main bullet points were that players should get more of a percent of the revenue, contracts should be guaranteed, the salary cap should be removed, and the CBA has lots of language that is negative to the players. So I wanted to discuss a few of these points. I think the first thing to make mention of is the salary cap. The concept of the salary cap is to promote competitive balance in the NFL. The general concept is designed to create a system that prevents a team like the Cowboys or 49ers of the early 90s from engaging in an arms race that depletes the rest of the league of talent. The worry is that the NFL would turn into a few “superteams” like we see in the NBA. The NBA playoffs are great because of the few superteams but the regular seasons are a chore. The NFL’s money is really made because of the regular season and idea that every year basically 27 or 28 of 32 teams have a legit chance at the playoffs. The question is does the salary cap contribute to this anymore? I’m not 100% sure that it does. When the 2011 CBA was agreed upon there were changes that impacted the league. For one the union tied spending to the cap on a per team basis. This more or less prevents a team from tanking for too long of a period by not spending on a roster (you can get away with a cheap year but that’s probably it). The agreement also had a new rule that allowed teams to just carry over as much cap room as they wanted year by year, something only the more shrewd organizations did in the past. There were changes to the rookie scale (more on that in a minute). Teams were able to use these things to move away from traditional salary cap management that made it difficult to manage a roster to all cash systems that have more or less rendered the cap meaningless for a large portion of the NFL. Of course that doesn’t stop teams from telling agents that they are cap strapped but in most cases that’s on the agent for not seeing through the BS. That said the salary cap is such an integral part of the NFL that I'm not sure its something that can be negotiated out of the CBA or worth going to fight over it. There are ways that players can use the salary cap to their advantage which can be done by tweaking rules related to proration and just better educating the player side about the cap. That leaves more room for fighting about revenues and other issues, one of which could be guarantees. Okung makes the excellent point that these is nothing that prevents agents from negotiating guaranteed deals (he points to Kirk Cousins as an example and obviously draft picks are a great example as well) but they don’t do it. This is a big problem with the movement in the league in general and something that I think is worth discussing and brings me also to the first point on rookie contracts. There was a time when agents really had more control over the NFL. There was far more creativity that existed pre 2011 in particular from the rookie contracts that were negotiated for the top 10 picks in the draft. From escalators to incentives to buyouts and everything in between agents controlled the discussions. Salaries for top picks escalated to the point where salaries far exceeded expectations on the field. The contracts were relatively iron clad and in many cases helped put teams into a bind with their salary cap which forced them into bad contracts elsewhere (see the Detroit Lions of Suh, Stafford, and Johnson) that virtually guaranteed more and more contract years for players. Fast forward to 2011 and the NFL took control via a rookie wage scale. Salary cap charge increases were modest at a straight 25% per year per player. Teams never had to deal with a massive cap charge in year 2 or year 5. It was easy budgeting. Growth was controlled by salary cap inflation preventing bad salary cap managers from screwing up the comps for the rest of the NFL. You no longer had positions that would see immediate growth from a player being drafted such as Suh becoming the highest paid defensive tackle in the NFL before stepping foot onto the field. I think this really hurt players more than they realized. With those big deals gone agents also have become far too eager to negotiate extensions early rather than necessarily fighting more for the contract. It really shifted who held all the leverage in a number of areas when it came to negotiations. Players I think would get better deals if they found ways to regain this strength at the negotiating table. Okung’s solution would be to basically not put the faith in agents and instead just make contracts guaranteed. I do think that this is fine but there would need to be an acceptance in the agent/player/media community that the contract dynamics will change with a fully guaranteed system. There comes a point where carrying too much dead weight (players with reduced skill) or dead money (the cap charge from cutting the reduced skill player) significantly hurts the product on the field. While the NFL may be slower than other sports to embrace analytics they are well aware of the limited lifecycle of the NFL player. This varies position by position (QBs and offensive linemen can have longer careers while cornerbacks and running backs are often shorter careers) but that lifecycle will impact the contract offer. Even if the cap was removed teams simply are not going to sign a big name 27 year old back to a 5 year, $45 million fully guaranteed deal. That’s not going to make a team competitive. Looking around today’s NFL I would say that most contracts that are five or more years would now be three year contracts, four year deals would be reduced to two years, and everyone else would be on a one year contract. That doesn’t mean that this is bad for the players but it does limit the impact of the guaranteed contract since we are really going year by year in most cases. Initial cash flows will likely be lower compared to today’s contracts because the team is now assuming all risk in a contract. Based on the Cousins contract I think a fair amount will likely be 90% of the current system contract, with that number moving a bit up or down based on the position. A player in theory could earn more without those guarantees, even on a short term deal, if teams are using the guarantee as a tradeoff. The 1st year guarantee is bogus in all cases because no team signing a player to a big contract is cutting him in the first year. There should be almost no discount for that guarantee at all because its zero risk for the team. It just sounds great when ESPN reports it. GMs also look to protect themselves by getting anything out of a big deal because it reflects badly on them when a player flops badly so they chase deals regardless of guarantees. The point is agents should not get all hyper on guarantees if it is costing them in the long run, but that’s a story for a different day. While the 90% maybe doesn’t sound as great as many think, it forces the players to accept a far more aggressive nature when it comes to contracts and free agency which is good. Players and agents are too accepting and conforming to the NFL system with few exceptions such as Cousins. Okung makes the point about how poor a valuation metric like APY is but it has become a benchmark. That’s fine for doing a long term contract or for sites like mine to try to put some context behind it but from an agents/players perspective they should be taking a much deeper view of the contract which is in line with what he is discussing. When I work with people on contracts I always deal with cash flows, which is the most important thing with a contract. But when mapping out a career plan we need to dig deeper. We should be looking at either the guaranteed portion or virtually guaranteed portion of a contract and valuing deals in that manner. Now by guarantees we need to clarify that contracts that are guaranteed for skill is what we are talking about as that is the primary reason why a player is released. Injury guarantees are nothing much more than an optical illusion used by teams and agents to make something sound impressive when in reality it isn’t. When we look at virtual guarantees we can look at favorable vesting schedules (i.e. a players 2019 and 2020 salary become fully guaranteed next February) or the salary cap consequence of cutting a player being so high that it makes no sense to cut the player. That really gives us our market values. For example when we look at Olivier Vernon we say he is a $17 million player. In reality a player like Vernon is worth more. Why do I say that? The Giants virtually guaranteed him $41 million for two seasons. That was the risk the Giants were willing to take on for his contract. They felt confident enough to pay him for those two years and then see where things go. If you feel that the third year is virtually guaranteed then we are looking at a contract worth about $17.7M a season. Those numbers are all not considering cap inflation. If we inflate the numbers into 2018, 2019, and 2020 terms we are talking $46.5 million over two and $61 million over three years. What that tells me is that if a proven player can continue to hit free agency we need to use those future estimates to project true earning potential. Remember the NFL contract is all about risk and what this illustrates is that the long term contract is not indicative of the NFL team taking on the risk. Sure all those big injury guarantees sound great but who is really taking on the risk when we look at the big picture? Vernon received $13 million in additional injury protection and $44 million in backend salary with his contract to hit his gigantic $17M APY. But what did he give up? Based on what the Giants fully guaranteed him he gave up at least a $55M payout on the backend. So for $13M in injury guarantees, a pretty rare event to be collected on, he could be giving up $11 million in real money. So who is really paying the premium on the guarantee? Not the Giants. Its really Vernon giving up $11M for that injury protection. This is the problem with the way agents negotiate contracts and this is in no way done to pick on the Vernon deal. I just thought it was a great example because it is one of the best player contracts in the NFL and a current gold standard. The agent community I don’t think gets much support to do otherwise though nor are players given the financial tools to understand the tradeoffs. An agent should consider 5 situations on a long term deal. Scenario 1 is the player plays great for 5 years and fulfills his contract. Scenario 2 is that the player plays pretty well and is cut after 4 years of the contract and can sign a mid level deal after that. Scenario 3 is that the player is a moderate success and cut after three years with some interest in his talents. Scenario 4 is that the player is a bust and is basically done after two years. Scenario 5 is that the player gets seriously injured. You can add you own probabilities to each scenario but I can tell you the least likely is scenario 5. Just for kicks I made up my own probabilities but we can run a number of contract comps to come up with a more accurate estimation of each scenario. What are the five year earnings for a player like Vernon in each of these scenarios under a long term and short term contract strategy? The assumptions I will be making here are that Vernon will earn 90% of his current two year value on a short term deal and 90% of the future inflation deals. In scenarios where he is released well use a sliding scale based on some recent 1 year kind of deals for the Mario Williams types (i.e. somewhere between $7 and $10M for a year) or lower end ($5M and down) if cut early and then slide down from there. The first short term deal we look at is the two year contract. Scenario 1 Scenario 2 Scenario 3 Scenario 4 Scenario 5 Long term deal $85,000,000 $79,500,000 $64,000,000 $49,750,000 $53,000,000 Short term deal $113,550,000 $88,750,000 $82,250,000 $45,650,000 $36,900,000 Short term benefit $28,550,000 $9,250,000 $18,250,000 ($4,100,000) ($16,100,000) Probability 0.15 0.25 0.35 0.2 0.05 Expected Return $4,282,500 $2,312,500 $6,387,500 ($820,000) (-$805,000) The expectation should be that Vernon, by doing a series of two year contracts, would earn $11.25M more over a five year period by using a guaranteed short term structure rather than a traditional structure. What if he did a three year guaranteed deal? Scenario 1 Scenario 2 Scenario 3 Scenario 4 Scenario 5 Long term deal $85,000,000 $79,500,000 $64,000,000 $49,750,000 $53,000,000 Short term deal $96,700,000 $96,700,000 $58,700,000 $45,650,000 $47,700,000 Short term benefit $11,700,000 $17,200,000 ($5,300,000) ($4,100,000) ($5,300,000) Probability 0.15 0.25 0.35 0.2 0.05 Expected Return $1,755,000 $4,300,000 -$1,855,000 -$820,000 -$265,000 Here he comes moderately more ahead with about $3.1M more in expected earnings. This is why it really isn’t the team taking on a massive risk with the injury guarantee. Its little more than optics because in the long run they make out better by taking on the risk of a pretty unlikely event. In any event the bottom line is that the tools are there now for agents to attempt to work such contracts out on their own with a team. Working with agents to give them more leverage to do this would allow the union to focus on bigger issues like revenue splits, the removal of the franchise tag, and most importantly the overhaul of the free agent system. Discussions like this often come up around this time because NBA free agency results in some massive contracts and we are reminded of how much those athletes make. One of the big differences here though is that NBA players come into the league at 18 and 19 years of age and are hitting their first extensions at the time NFL players are just signing their rookie contracts. They also have a longer career expectancy, so they are getting multiple shots at the big dollars. NFL players are lucky to get one shot. The NBA also has limits for players which allows lesser players to earn more. The union has fallen into a trap of accepting some argument that NFL rookie contracts must be 4 or 5 years because of whatever development period there is and initial cost there is. Maybe there was a time that was true but is it still true? How many times nowadays do we see a young player more or less have his fate decided by the end of his second season in the NFL? Other than at QB I’d say pretty often and even for QBs we see teams get ready for an alternative by year 3 if they haven’t seen that spark. So why do you give the team control for at least 5 years? It makes no sense. By the time the player is done with his rookie contract and tag year more often than not they are about to enter a decline phase. Rather than cashing in at age 24 or 25 and then getting another shot at 27 or 28 they are forced to wait until age 27 for their first crack at free agency. Rookie contracts really should be modified to either include expensive 3rd and 4th year options for all rounds or they should be allowed to become free agents. Modifying the cap or instituting guaranteed deals is not an easy negotiation but there was already movement on rookie contracts and that’s an area that I think they could tweak which would benefit a lot of players. I do feel for agents in these situations because they get a bad rap and when you write something like this its basically telling them to not accept the norms and do differently. I think that falls on the union to help agents more with training and to find more ways to protect them from losing players when a deal doesn’t get done so quick and they find a new agent who woos them away with promises of gold that never materialize. I know we talk about collusion among teams to hold wages down or drive players from the NFL but the players are the ones who need to collude to change things. The new CBA still wont happen for a few years but they have power to make things change if some want to sacrifice. Even when it comes to the franchise tag as long as everyone agrees to no extensions teams wont have the tag to use. For instance in Minnesota it would have been a lock that at least Danielle Hunter or Anthony Barr would have been a free agent this year but now its likely neither will. Force the teams hands by actions with your contracts and use free agency to earn the biggest amount of surefire salary possible and prepare to do it again in two or three years.
  19. 1 point
    Larz

    Anyone here ever quit drinking?

    I wish this was 1989 lol All I remember know is her name was Lisa and she dumped me when her boyfriend came home from a month long trip The bar is now the oasis in Smithtown
  20. 1 point
    GATA

    Happy birthday, flgreen!

    Happy Bday !
  21. 1 point
    JoJoTownsell1

    Jets Odds To Make The Playoffs.

    Heading down to AC this weekend. Plan on placing a $100 bet on the Jets to win the SB. No, I don't think they will win it all, but the odds are about 120-1, meaning if you bet 100 you get back $12,000. The rationale is that the Bills/Fish are pretty bad, the Pats are showing some signs of cracking and no longer have Jimmy G around to save them if Brady gets hurt. On the Jets side, they won 5 games last year and have an easier schedule this year with a team that is definitely better. I am not suggesting they have a good chance of winning division/SB, but at 120-1 (although I have seen it in the 100-1 or even 80-1 range), it's not a bad value bet. If they were 20-1 or even 50-1, I wouldn't touch it.
  22. 1 point
    Classic Ape - don't bother to prove how it's "not true". It's everyone else's fault, lol.
  23. 1 point
    With Hackenberg, the Jets coaching braintrust is developing a radical developmental technique of sitting rookie qbs through their first contract. Let's not rush in to this, show him some patience and start him year five; by then Mac will will have drafted more o linemen not related to Art Shell.
  24. 1 point
    BUM-KNEE

    Anyone here ever quit drinking?

    I guess I will add my thoughts/story. I drank like a fish since I was 17 or so, unfortunately in rural Maine theres not an overabundance to do. I had run ins with the law, blew out my knee, tore my shoulder up good too along the way. At age 36 I quit cold turkey in 2006, and felt pretty good about things. My health was better thats for sure, along with my wallet. I got my life in order for the most part. Then in the fall of 2014 my best friend killed himself, and the factory I worked at closed in the spring of 2015, thus ending my job. I thought about drinking heavily, but always talked myself out of it. I went to college for free because of the outsourced job, and was in my first semester of a business administration degree at age 45. Then my wife walked out, having a midlife crisis. 15 years of marriage thrown out the window. Then my father passed away 6 months later. I broke down into a deep depression and started drinking again, slowly picking up the intensity. Last winter I ran head on into a white birch tree on my snowmobile going roughly 70 mph while drinking. I thought I was dead, or at least busted up in good shape. But... I had no broken bones. My sled was nearly folded in half though. I now wonder how the hell I even made it this far in life. I took so many risks through the years while drinking, stupid risks. So much bad could have happened, and I reflect upon it often. I have now greatly moderated my booze intake, and feel like I could quit cold turkey again if needed. I slip back down the ladder once in awhile, thinking of my Dad and my effing wife. But..... I wont stop moving forward, and I wont stop trying to have a better life. I graduated college with honors, and was the oldest in my class. I did that for me, to prove a point to myself. I wanted to plant my flag in the mound of BS that I was dealing with at the time. MY FLAG MFer! There are many ways people can screw up, its all in how you learn from the mistakes. Nothing is going to stop you but yourself, and nothing feels sweeter than achieving your goal, whatever that may be. If you let booze control you, its nearly impossible for your mind to make good decisions. I know you are on the right track, you just gotta fine tune the carbs a bit to get optimum mileage. MAN HUG
  25. 1 point
    Jet_Engine1

    Anyone here ever quit drinking?

    Fell off the wagon yesterday. Feel terrible about it. Did a ton of Yard work in about 100* heat. Neighbor walked over with cold beers and I figured what the heck, I worked my ass off, its hot, and its only a beer..... Woke up feeling like sh*t and my wifes disappointment. I recognize that it was a slip, a moment of bad judgement, but I need to stay at zero. None. Day 1 on the clock.


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