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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/18/2022 in all areas

  1. L Bell T Johnson Revis part 2 cromartie part 2 j mccareins d mason
    23 points
  2. https://www.si.com/nfl/2022/03/18/deshaun-watson-trade-due-diligence-myth Don’t try to fool us with spin, and don’t insult us by talking about “due diligence.” Some NFL team is going to trade a bunch of assets for Deshaun Watson, a Pro Bowl quarterback who has been accused of sexual misconduct in lawsuits filed by 22 women, for one simple reason: It wants a Pro Bowl quarterback so desperately that it doesn’t care he was accused of sexual misconduct by 22 women. This is the way of pro sports. People who wouldn’t trust Watson alone in a room with a loved one are eager to have him on the field. Watson can help people win a Super Bowl, or at least win enough games to stay employed. Through his lawyer, he has denied any wrongdoing and asserted that the 22 women who accused him of sexual misconduct are lying. And a grand jury declined to indict him on criminal charges (more on that later). But there is one overriding fact you should always remember about a man who has been accused of sexual misconduct by 22 women, which is that he has been accused of sexual misconduct by 22 women. The conversation about Deshaun Watson’s “character” should start there and never stray very far. So, to the Atlanta Falcons: If you trade for Watson, don’t sell us any garbage about how you got to know him when he was your ball boy. You know, as though a ball boy could never go on to commit sexual misconduct. To the Carolina Panthers and New Orleans Saints: Not a word about “due diligence,” O.K.? You need a quarterback and Watson is a great one. If you cared about his character, you would Google him, and then you’d have to grapple with those accusations of sexual misconduct by 22 women. Cleveland Browns, you have already disgraced yourselves by meeting with Watson and then leaking that you want to move on from Baker Mayfield because you want an “adult in the room,” as though a man who has been accused of sexual misconduct by 22 women can provide some sort of cultural boost. You want a better quarterback, and Watson is better than Mayfield. That’s it. And to everybody: Do not, under any circumstances, claim that a Houston grand jury exonerated Watson last week. It did nothing of the kind. It simply chose not to indict him. If you cite the grand jury’s decision not to press charges as proof he did nothing wrong, you only reveal your own ignorance about the criminal-justice system generally and sexual-assault cases specifically. But you don’t have to be ignorant, because Melissa Morabito did some due diligence for you. Wasn’t that nice of her? Morabito is an associate professor in the University of Massachusetts-Lowell School of Criminology and Justice Studies and co-author of a U.S. Department of Justice-funded study of decision-making and attrition in sexual-assault cases. The study covers 3,269 cases over a three-year period across six states. Only 1.6% of cases where sexual assault was reported to police ever made it to court. Morabito says the chances of Watson facing a jury trial were probably lower, because most of the accusations by the 22 women involve forcible fondling as opposed to direct penetration or rape, though at least one woman accused him of forcing her to perform oral sex. As Ann Burdges, a former police detective who is now president of End Violence Against Women International, says, these kinds of acts can be, “scripted by an offender in a setting of which there is isolation, control, and two people.” The lack of direct eyewitnesses and physical evidence made this an extremely hard case to win. Add misperceptions about the massage-therapy profession and it becomes even harder. It’s true that the threshold for a grand-jury indictment is lower than for a jury conviction, and prosecutors have wide discretion in how they present their cases to grand juries. But let’s be real about how that game is often played, even when somebody is accused of sexual misconduct by at 22 women. Some prosecutors worry about using resources on what they believe is a losing proposition, and they know they are often judged on their winning percentage in jury trials. This is one reason they can be reluctant to aggressively pursue sexual assault cases. As Morabito points out, with a high-profile case, simply dropping the case would be a bad look … but if the D.A. took it to a grand jury—where proceedings are private—and then intentionally presented a weak case, then what would happen? The grand jury would decide not to indict. The prosecutor wouldn’t risk losing a high-profile jury trial, but could still claim to have taken the case seriously. “They can tell whatever story they want to tell,” Morabito says. “So it is a way to dispose of a case to show that, ‘I've done something, but it's not my fault. It's the fault of the grand jury.’” This might sound like a wild conspiracy theory, but it shouldn’t. “That’s not only reasonable,” Burdges says, “I’m sure that is a reality in many, many, many, many cases that are driven by more complex agendas than just presenting the facts to the grand jury.” SI reached out to the Harris County district attorney’s office to ask about the nine criminal cases brought to the grand jury. In response to a question about a New York Times report that, “several of the women who filed criminal complaints also sat in a room together at the Harris County Criminal Justice Center, ready to provide testimony, but only one was called in front of the grand jury,” Dane Schiller, the district attorney office’s director of communications, wrote in an email, “Grand jury proceedings are secret under Texas law. That means that we are strictly prohibited from discussing them and that includes revealing anything about evidence. I can tell you that the presentation lasted more than six hours.” To another question, about, specifically, what information was presented to the grand jury, Schiller wrote, “I am prohibited from revealing or discussing what evidence was presented. This is not an instance of not wanting to assist but we simply can’t go there.” Because of the legal requirement for secrecy, we have no way of knowing how hard prosecutors fought for these charges. But we should not simply assume that the grand jurors heard the best possible case and decided not to indict based on the evidence. And even if they did decide that the alleged conduct was not an indictable offense, that still does not mean that Deshaun Watson lived up to the ethical standards we expect from pro athletes, or, really, human beings. NFL teams can thank the New York Times for their due diligence if they would like. Or they can read Sports Illustrated’s independent reporting that uncovered corroborating evidence of one plaintiff’s claim, and also telling the story of a licensed massage therapist—not among the plaintiffs—who had a similarly problematic session with Watson. But please, please, please don’t come at us with any nonsense about how all 22 women accused him of sexual misconduct because he is rich and famous. Watson’s fame means that anybody accusing him goes through hell. His money means he can find lawyers to win in court. “He may think he has a target on his back,” Burdges says. “But really, he's got a hall pass in his pocket.” Burdges read through news stories about Watson being accused of sexual misconduct by 22 women, and she couldn’t even believe we were having this conversation: “Do you really think another team will want him, as toxic and tainted as he is with this? And having been dropped by so many sponsors?” The answer to that was: Of course they want him even though he has been accused of sexual misconduct by 22 women. Great quarterbacks are the NFL’s hidden treasure. Everybody wants one and nobody knows exactly where to look. Teams see Watson as a rare gem: a young and proven superstar who is sitting out in the open, waiting to be acquired. But if that’s all they see, they aren’t really looking. There are still civil cases still pending against Watson. For the plaintiffs, those are easier to win than criminal cases, but Watson could also settle them and claim he only did so because he wants to “move on” and “restore my name” after being accused of sexual misconduct by 22 women. NFL commissioner Roger Goodell will probably suspend Watson, but a suspension would likely cost Watson games, not years, because Watson was never indicted after being accused of sexual misconduct by 22 women. If the general manager who acquires him is honest—which he won’t be—he will say that he doesn’t care if Watson is a good person as long as he is a rational one. Watson can earn hundreds of millions more dollars playing the game he loves if he just behaves for the rest of his career. A person of sound mind should be able to do that; a person with a pathological need to overpower and humiliate women could not. Publicly, some team will be counting on Deshaun Watson to play awesome football. And privately, they’ll hope he does not get accused of sexual misconduct by more women.
    19 points
  3. This is the worst analysis I've ever seen in my life.
    17 points
  4. Amazing that this clown gets a raise after all the issues he created last year and with a pending suspension hanging over his head. It must be nice
    15 points
  5. That high-ranking personnel guy in the AFC? Joe Douglas.
    15 points
  6. "This former New York Jets scout explains why these 15 different prospects shouldn't be picked in the first round during the 2022 NFL draft." In other words, these should be the top 15 picks.
    15 points
  7. I think you’re conflating “don’t want” with “realized it was never happening”.
    12 points
  8. Seriously...barely 2 pages of responses over there...I mean even our "Jets Trade Blake Cashman" thread has 3 pages...
    11 points
  9. Oh hell no. Cookie has now moved to the Gallows for the rest of March.
    11 points
  10. The AFC has 2 Justin Herberts? Boy are we screwed!
    11 points
  11. Says the f**kin guy assuming all massage therapists are sex workers? GFY
    11 points
  12. STFU Delete this thread plus ban.
    10 points
  13. 10 points
  14. I would stop watching if he went to the Jets. I don't see how any man with daughters could root for him.
    10 points
  15. That's good - I was starting to worry the AFC was really lacking talent.
    9 points
  16. Sign this beast so we can post about it in kmnj's latest whiny thread about Jets fans not wanting any stars.
    9 points
  17. So just a thought on all of this. IF we knew we had a stud young QB, I think it would be worth bringing in a top WR on a stupid contract. And let's be honest, Adam's contract is stupid. That's a "we're all in right now" deal. Robinson's contract is affordable but very high for the risk, as was Cooper's. I think if we can determine this year that Wilson is going to become a good QB, then next year, we can see that kind of deal happen. But if Wilson doesn't pan out, carrying an expensive WR is only going to make it harder to solve the QB problem.
    9 points
  18. Ok, jokes aside - honest response. There were two options going into this season, as I see it. Do exactly what they're doing, and build "the right wayTM" around Zach Wilson, hoping he does in fact grow into the player they drafted him to be, or YOLO it, go after a bunch of big names, and trade off Wilson after trying to secure Rodgers/Wilson/Watson. Half measures is what we've been used to, and it's no surprise it hasn't worked. Add to that, those three guys (with Rodgers returning to GB) have the clout at this point to decide where they play, and I think it's safe to consider that Rodgers wasn't going to come here, Watson is being traded out of the conference, and that left Wilson. Additionally, Devante Adams wasn't coming here. So that big fish was out too. Essentially, we either land Russell Wilson, or there's no other path to compete in 2022. Even with all that, by not making a big move, our incremental growth can be accelerated, with two top 10 picks. We've solidified the offensive line, so we should come out of this with at worst two of these three: top edge, top DB, top WR, and still have two good 2nd round picks as well. Personally, I have faith that we'll do at least reasonably well with those picks, and next offseason, if Wilson bombs, I have no issue taking our 2023 top 10 pick, and going after whatever QB might be dangling. Hell, I'd have brought in someone this offseason that could beat him out too, but that player wouldn't make the Jets a competitor in todays AFC. Long story short, I'm on board with the plan, even if I don't trust/believe in Wilson. I guess I just don't see the alternative.
    9 points
  19. The Jets would have needed to beat the Raiders contract by a significant margin in addition to giving up two high picks. I’m going to pass on that.
    9 points
  20. If we got Justin Jefferson, I would suck all your dicks
    9 points
  21. Guys (and gals), If you want to be banned, can I ask that you just ask a mod nicely? It's less work than having to first lock a thread....say like the one about Russia...and then ban you. No cookies here ever again. You'll have to get your weather reports from the normal channels. That is all.
    8 points
  22. Browns managed to massage a trade with a happy ending
    8 points
  23. Comes to see FA news…. HeRe’s WhY i dOn’T ThiNK wIlSon iS gOOd! hERe’s wHy I dO tHiNk wIlsON iS gOod
    8 points
  24. Saints were over the cap yesterday, didn’t cut anyone, have room for a star QB contract today JD: my price is my price
    8 points
  25. "Stars" are generally fool's gold. I like the way JD has approached this offseason so far. He filled in holes without locking us into crappy contracts
    8 points
  26. Mostly because most Jets fans have functioning brains and can see that most of the "stars" are declining aging has beens that will generally perform at a JAG level last 2 or 3 years with roster crippling salaries and then leave with dead money that cripples the team more. With rare exceptions "star" players rapidly decline on their third contract which is were most of these "stars" become available. It is fool's gold and every decade there are a couple that actually work out but for most part when the Jets or any team has a "star" available they are shadows of the player that made them stars.
    8 points
  27. Yeah that was ruthless... and they ain't wrong.
    8 points
  28. I’m not sure why some of you guys have such hard time grasping that Adams would have to approve what team he was going to be traded to.
    8 points
  29. I dont want the Jets giving a WR 29 million a year. Let him go underperform his contract with Carr passing to him.
    8 points
  30. See...now this was awful to start, but if it's making you eat Melba Toast, that is a bridge too far. I extended the ban to infinity. This is a textbook example of how to get one of those.
    7 points
  31. This is honestly kinda disgusting. It's like hey don't worry if you're suspended because of those times you took advantage of women, we'll just take less money this year, so you're covered Deshaun. I hope this fails massively.
    7 points
  32. Cashman passed his physical
    7 points
  33. Where would I draft Zach Wilson? Daniel Kelly’s Draft Board: 3rd round — and I would not select him if I was a GM. He would not even be on my draft board. It would be foolish to take him in the first round. He will get everybody fired. Best chance to succeed is in an offense filled with trick plays.
    7 points
  34. I don't know about that, but I know for damn sure that nobody did a competent job of teaching you how to be a good man
    7 points
  35. We had a star and gave him away for two first rounders and a third rounder. We have never been the same.
    7 points
  36. We know that scumbag Brady was paid under the table, so probably him.
    7 points
  37. Jets fans have a deep-seated fear of winning football games, which is why they hate it when new coaches or GMs come in and try to fix the team, but lionize coaches that they know are actively hurting the team.
    7 points
  38. It’s Zach’s fault. Should have played at Fresno State circa 2012. Who the hell goes to BYU?
    7 points
  39. I don't understand this one at all. You would think the Packers want to go all in on the last few years of Rodgers contract. A trade like this would have made sense if Rodgers had retired or moved on. But now, after re-signing him. Makes no sense to me. I would assume this possiblity was discussed with Rodgers before signing his deal, otherwise, he can't be happy. This one genuinely shocks me.
    7 points
  40. I am a Jet fan. My son is a Jet fan. And both of us plan to do everything in our power to make certain his 18 month old son will be a Jet fan. Miserable Sunday afternoons in the fall are a Lith family tradition. Soon to span 3 generations.
    7 points
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