Jump to content

viguy007

Members
  • Posts

    24
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation

0 Neutral
  1. Plain NFL QB rating for 2014 #9 Ryan Fitzpatrick 95.3 #18 Mark Sanchez 88.3 #22 Colin Kaepernick 86.4 @34 Geno Smith 77.5
  2. Ok, Just know PFF had colin kaepernick listed as #28 overall QB, Ryan Fitzpatrick as #12, Mark Sanchez as #27, and Geno Smith #36, last year. It looks like we already have a better QB then Kaep on our team. As a matter of act we cut a better QB in the 2014 offseason, then Kaep was in 2014.
  3. Most fans are not me. It makes no difference in my life if we win or lose as long as I have fun.
  4. All true, but I still love Rex.
  5. Man, I do not care if he wins or loses, Rex was fun to watch and I wish he was still a HC here. Football is just entertainment, and you can not say he did not fit that bill
  6. Man, I do not care if he wins or loses, Rex was fun to watch and I wish he was still a HC here. Football is just entertainment, and you can not say he did not fit that bill
  7. If we cut anyone, we get no compensation. Only a UFA will get you compensatory draft picks. If a trade the best we could hope for would be a 6th rounder.
  8. Go to http://www.sharpfootballanalysis.com/blog/2015/the-new-england-patriots-mysteriously-became-fumble-proof-in-2007 For an analytics answer to your implied question
  9. So many non-believers here, yet more and more NFL team are adopting analytics. In the future this will be the NFL: What if a coach had access to real-time data that showed how the defense was responding (or not) to a ferocious ofensive drive that got them deep into enemy territory? What if he could seize upon that data to identify a weakness in the secondary within the 40-second play clock and and hurry-up offense (which makes it almost impossible for the defense to substitute) to call a play designed to exploit that weakness, one that he could feel much more confident about employing than the standard generic run up the middle on a goal-line situation? The NFL has partnered with Microsoft to make this a reality
  10. It seems like every year after the offseason, we question he ability of the New England Patriots to repeat as the dominant team in the AFC. Yet they have excelled at drafting no names who produce, and signing unconventional players such as Julian Edelman, Danny Woodhead, and Wes Welker. The success of this team has been driven by their coaching staff’s ability to effectively evaluate talent and make critical strategy decisions using football analytics. Crunching numbers and poring over statistics has always been a big part of professional sports for fans, coaches and team managers alike. But advanced analytics -- with its many confusing acronyms and complicated formulas -- has so far been the domain of only the most hardcore fantasy sports enthusiasts. That is until recently, since more and more NFL teams are beginning to buy into the worth of the advanced metrics which make up Analytics. As ESPN pointed out "Patriots owner Robert Kraft worked with a former colleague in the 1990s to create statistical models for player valuation. And for the past 15 years, Belichick has relied heavily on his football research director to collaborates with him to develop a variety of cutting-edge approaches to team building and game play. There is little doubt that the Patriots invest time and energy looking for every edge, and their commitment to ruthlessly outsmarting the competition is a Belichick trademark." ESPN also pointed out "the Jets were built around the old-school sensibilities of Rex Ryan, with line coach Dave DeGuglielmo summing up the traditional mindset with a 2012 rant against analytics: 'All of a sudden we're 'Moneyballing' offensive lineman,' he said. '[The] world I live in isn't a fantasy world.' Ryan's departure does not herald a new approach to analytics. Team owner Woody Johnson has given no indication analytics will be incorporated into the Jets' football operations. New GM Mike Maccagnan, and new coach Todd Bowles have done little with analytics, have old-school credentials (the good ol' eye test), and were not hired to spearhead a analytics awakening for Gang Green." In my fanpost "Is Chris Owusu A Diamond In The Rough" I used a rudimentary form of analytics to show Osusu is better then perhaps we give him credit for being. Of course, this is based on a limited snap count of 87 and only six targets, so any analysis is flawed to this extent, and we can only have a low level of confidence in the results. But leaving the debate about Owusu aside, what Jet Fans should be concerned about is the fact that the Jets are one of the most resistance teams to incorporating analytics in player evaluation in the NFL. So what are analytics? Analytics (in a broad sense) have been around since sports began, only we used to call them stats. Baseball is famous for its wealth of statistics, from batting average, earned run average, on base percentage, and so on. But which statistics are most important? For decades, baseball talent evaluators used basic statistics like batting average as their primary evaluation tools. This began to change in the late 1990s and early 2000s as a few pioneers began looking at what are now called “advanced analytics” to get beyond the surface and find the measurements that actually equate to wins. Football has arguably a more difficult evaluation problem than baseball. Baseball tends to be heavily based on individual matchups. A hitter, for example, is primarily facing only the pitcher on any given pitch, not the entire opposing team. In football, 11 players must coordinate their actions efficiently to have success on any given play, and those actions must take into account the actions of the opposing team’s 11 players and how they will react to their own actions. That’s a far more complex problem. The one of the biggest challenge for NFL teams is trying to determine which players’ college success will translate best to the pros. That’s not real easy. The transition from college to the pros is an extraordinarily difficult one, especially at positions like quarterback and defensive back. These are two of the most difficult positions to play in all of sports, both mentally and physically. To avoid drafting someone who will be a “draft bust” teams are increasingly taking a quantitative approach to help with their evaluations. Now, most teams on the cutting edge of evaluating the draft, are providing their football decision-makers with analytics to help supplement their decision-making when it comes to the NFL draft. In player evaluations the use of more quantitative statistical analysis is increasing as teams try to gain an edge. Organizations like ADVANCED FOOTBALL ANALYTICS, FOOTBALL OUTSIDER, and PRO FOOTBALL FOCUS are showing that data analytics can provide value in an area where evaluators have traditionally relied as much on intuition and “gut” as on quantitative metrics. Sports analytics brings a more refined and business like approach to player evaluation by seeking efficiencies and maximizing performance. The idea is to identify player metrics that are shown—statistically—to correlate highest to wins, then value players according to those metrics. In this way, sports analytics extends and enhances the more traditional statistics like 40-yard dash time. Analytics helps a team win by helping it make better decisions, from the personnel office to the huddle. Adding an analytic approach to a team's decision process clarifies goals, options, and risks. It makes hidden and implicit assumptions explicit. It gives decision makers the best, most relevant information available. Analytics began to emerge in football in the past ten years as teams have gone from just analyzing game footage to putting a quantitative value on a player’s performance. One of the more widely known metrics is the quarterback rating. It is a complex rating that’s computed based on complete passes, pass attempts, passing yards, touchdown passes, and interceptions. Teams continue to analyze video to track, tabulate, and calculate how many times the opposing team, for example, blitzes when its defense is in a nickel formation, but they are also starting to use video to track the number of times that a cornerback misreads a slant route or runs into another defender when covering a pick play. “It’s not just about doing advanced scouting on teams’ formations, but targeting players so teams say, ‘We can run this play at this lineman,’ or ‘This cornerback can’t cover this particular route,’” Technology has been a big driver of the increased uptake of advanced analytics in the NFL. Highly specialized computer software that pores through statistical data is a popular method, but New York Giants Assistant General Manager Kevin Abrams points to a much more individualized way of gathering novel information about athletes' behavior. "Some of the newer technologies that we've found really effective are the wearable devices. Some of which are simple marketplace devices that anyone can purchase, but there are some more sophisticated devices we've been able to use that monitor a lot of different biometrics for players, and you combine all of those." Abrams says his organization now uses advanced analytics to evaluate coaching strategy, scout opponents, help train their players and prevent them from getting injured. However, he also believes the key to success is blending the new tools of analytics and the old ways together. "I think what's changed is that our competency level with analytics has grown. [but] analytics isn't going to be a one-stop, fix all, immediate solution," says Abrams. "What we do personnel-wise is still an 'eyeball' business, but I also think we can support our player personnel evaluations with better use of analytics." Essentially, Analytics created a new type of scouting that strictly looks at performance, not necessarily the process that gets there. This can be referred to as supplying the “what” as traditional scouts and coaches supply the “why.” Analytics can tell a team that an offensive tackle gives up an inordinate amount of bullrush pressure and traditional scouts and coaches can determine if it’s a lack of technique, functional strength, or perhaps a combination of the two. Traditional scouting may describe a player’s explosiveness off the edge, but Analytics can tell you how often a rusher actually got pressure to the outside shoulder of the offensive tackle. Other scouting reports will often describe a cornerback’s hip swivel, but Analytics look at how well he actually plays in coverage. A player’s athleticism is irrelevant in Analytics, unless it leads to productive on-field performance, a performance which may not be immediately apparent to traditional scouts and coaches. As Neil Hornsby, the founder of Pro Football Focus explained it: Statistics, of course, don’t provide all the answers, nor do they always give new answers, but they can offer a different perspective to help break down the game. “Whether a team should go for it on fourth-and-1, there’s been some analysis of that,” Hornsby says. “But the truth of it is, - 1) what is the sample size of data for that game being played in Buffalo, at a particular temperature in December, with 2)a right guard who has a dodgy hamstring and 3) the halfback just broke up with his girlfriend the previous day? - No amount of statistics can give you that answer. Only the coach can make that decision. “But what we can do, we can say to a coach, ‘If you see Calvin Johnson lining up as the inside slot receiver on a play in Week 14, and in every other circumstance where he has lined up in that position he has run this route—would that be useful to you?’ ” Yes, Analytics are not the be all and end all of football decision making, but it can make a substantial positive contribution to that decision making. And that is a reason for all Jets fans to be concerned. The MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference, is the Super Bowl of Analytics. A lot of smart people in various sports gathered this year to discuss the future direction and impact of analytics. Eighteen NFL teams were represented, including the Patriots (owner Robert Kraft was on a discussion panel) Dolphins, and Bills; but the Jets were nowhere to be seen. Some experts credit part of the success of the New England Patriots, who have been in more Super Bowls then any other team in the last 15 years, to this trend in analytics. “It is generally accepted that the Patriots are one of the most analytically advanced franchises in the NFL,” says Aaron Schatz, the creator of FootballOutsiders.com, a site that uses statistics to analyze the game. Patriots quarterback Tom Brady is known to be among the more disciplined analytical players. One account called him a “student of error” for his detailed review of incomplete and intercepted passes in game videos. In a 2014 press conference, he described what he thinks leads to success in professional football: You have to be a technician, you have to understand, you have to be a student of the game, you have to work, you have to understand what the coaches are asking, understand what the team is looking for and just keep working harder and harder and harder and then when you get your opportunity you have to make it pay off. Of course, full advantage from player and team performance analytics would seem to come when all the coaches and players on a team embrace analytics and use them to enhance their performance. Until the Jets FO makes this a part of their approach, the Jets will always be also-ran never a champion.
  11. When a Football player was an Undrafted Free Agent, most of us would dismiss him as not being very good and unable to contribute significantly to our team. This predisposition may taint and bias our evaluation of him, causing us not to see his positive attributes and missing a diamond in the rough. We must correct this by evaluating him anew, without the Undrafted Free Agent (UDFA) label, as if he were coming out in this year's Draft. If he were a part of the 2015 Wide Receiver draft class, his performance at the Combine would be the talk of the town. In the 40 YD DASH he ranked #5 amongst all Wide Receivers with a time of 4.36 seconds. In addition, in the BENCH PRESS he ranked #4 with 19 repetitions. His performance in the VERT JUMP was no less impressive as he was ranked #7 with a jump of 40.5 inches. But that was not all, he showed the explosive power in his legs in the BROAD JUMP where he was ranked #5 with a jump of 10'9". And he proved his agility in the 3 CONE DRILL, where he ranked #6 with a time of 6.85 seconds, and in the 20 YD SHUTTLE he was #8 with a time of 4.11 seconds. To top in all off, in the 60 YD SHUTTLE he was #3 with a time of 11.22 seconds. In other words, he was in the TOP EIGHT IN EVERY MEASURABLE TEST AT THE COMBINE, an athletic freak, who was 6'0" tall and weighted 196 pounds. But there are a lot of athletic freaks, who have fallen flat on their faces in the NFL because they can not catch the ball. Well in the regular 2014 season, according to ProFootballFocus (PFF), Chris Owusu was ranked as the 48th WR out of 218. Of course, that does not mean much since he was only on the field for 78 snaps. He was thrown at six time, including 2 deep balls, and made all six receptions (100%) for 78 yards or 13 yards per catch. In 2013 while in Tampa Bay he was targeted 18 times and made 13 receptions (72.2%) for 114 yards. In 2014, when Chris Owusu was thrown at, his QB had a rating of 133.5, which would make hlm Geno's best friend. The Pro Football Focus "Yards per Route Run" figure takes into account the number of snaps a player went into a pattern, thereby normalizing results, and providing a better indicator of production than Yards per Reception or even Yards per Target. Owusu’s figure was 1.49 and for comparison: Eric Decker 2.11, Percy Harvin 1.80, Brandon Marshall 1.50, Jeremy Kerley 0.97, Greg Salas 1.25, David Nelson 0.40, TJ Graham 1.00, All other Jets Receivers 0.00. Yet for some reason Chris Owusu has never been used very much, could it be because he is an UDFA. The one game in which Chris Owusu saw the most action last year was described by John B on Gang Green Nation: "In the first quarter he made a beautiful leaping catch against double coverage for a 36 yard gain. He finished that drive taking a pitch from Geno Smith around right end 23 yards to the corner of the end zone for a touchdown. He did a nice job on the run setting up Dolphins safety Jordan Kovacs, baiting a bad angle and then changing direction. He then returned the second half kickoff 87 yards, making himself small slipping through a small crease in the blocking and exploding through it." Yes, besides being a WR, Chris Owusu is also a good kick returner. In college, he posted a healthy 27.3 yard average on kickoff returns and took 3 of his 78 returns for touchdowns. In the NFL he has only been assigned to run back three kickoffs. One was the above 87 yard return. Another went for 45 with Tampa Bay. So why was Chris Owusu an Undrafted Free Agent? Is he stupid and can not learn the route tree? No, he is very smart. He attended Stanford (the Harvard of the West), majoring in biology with a 3.2 grade point average and does not seem to have any drug or other major character concerns. So perhaps the write-ups from before the 2012 draft might help us to understand why he seems to be underrated, ignored and dismissed: STRENGTHS Owusu is a smart receiver who runs routes well and knows how to get defensive backs to turn their hips to be able to stick his foot in the ground suddenly and gain separation. He has a decent sized frame and can use it to his advantage in traffic. He will go up for the ball in traffic and use his hands to catch the ball away from his body and bring it in. He is a threat after the catch with the ball in his hands, and it shows in his return skills, where he is a threat to take it the distance. WEAKNESSES There is some concern around Owusu's concussions, which kept him out for the better part of his senior season. Chris will have to show NFL teams he has recovered from the repeated blows and can return a strong player. His greatest value is as a returner, where he will get the job done but could struggle at the next level to be highly effective as he has only above-average speed and will have a tougher time taking it the distance against the pros. OVERVIEW Owusu has been a reliable receiver and return threat for Stanford throughout his career, who faced an unfortunate set of injuries in his senior season that could severely hurt his draft status going into 2012. With the current attention being given to concussions and the "return-to-play" protocols, teams will have a tough time justifying Owusu as he recovers from a concussion-laden senior season. Despite these red flags, Owusu is a mature player on the field who would be a reliable return option when healthy. - NFL.com ---------------------------------------- A well-built wide out prospect with a strong frame and physical element to his play. Is tighter in the hips, but displays enough short area quickness off the line with and good use of his hands to keep defenders from getting into his frame and avoiding the press. Knows how to keep himself clean and will get physical vs. the jam. Is a natural starter who accelerates quickly down the field and can create initial separation behind defenders. Possesses good ball skills and awareness when asked to locate and run, is willing to go up and high point the play and is above average for his size in jump ball situations. Displays a real savvy about his game as well, does a nice job stemming his route, using subtle head/shoulder fakes to set up routes and keeps corners off balance. Really sells the double move and accelerates quickly once he gains a step. Displays a good feel for zone coverage as well, works to find soft spots and plucks away from his frame. Can be dangerous after the catch. Isn’t real shifty in tight areas and lacks the wiggle to routinely breakdown defenders and make a man miss. However, he runs hard, plants his foot in the ground with natural balance -even at full speed- and can explode toward daylight. Lacks elite top end speed, but runs well, looks like a 4.45-4.5 guy. Isn’t the most fluid of sharply breaking route runners. Is routinely forced to gear down, chops his feet in order to gain balance and doesn’t create much separation. Doesn’t waste much space out of his breaks and is a sharp route runner, just doesn’t have much of a burst when looking to gain initial separation. Adds some special teams play as a kick return man. Sets up blocks well, is a good decision maker and runs hard to daylight. Isn’t a dynamic make you miss athlete, but takes care of the football and is a solid return option. Impression: A bit linear of an athlete. However, is a natural pass catcher with good straight-line speed and a real savvy about his game. Will find a way to contribute to an NFL receiving core as a solid secondary option. - National FootBall Post ------------------------------------------- "Lean, muscular, athletic “X” receiver who has been a playmaker as a receiver and return man when healthy and will be a pro. However, his ceiling is a bit of an unknown, as he has been affected by injuries dating back to high school. Accelerates off the snap, sells routes and uncovers in zone windows. Is mentally and physically tough, takes care of his body and shows good functional strength off the line of scrimmage and after the catch. - Pro FootBall Weekly ----------------------------------------- POSITIVES -- Lit up the combine, was one of the fastest players in attendance; a terrific overall athlete, had a 40.5" vertical and can really go up and high point the football... Great lower body explosion, really accelerates quickly and gets up field in a hurry... Although not big, he has a nice build, appears to have a strong upper body and put up 19 reps of 225 pounds at the combine... Does a good job fighting off press coverage, uses his strength to his advantage and is tough to jam with his initial quickness... Does a good job of catching the ball with his arms extended and doesn't let the ball get into his body... Solid route runner, does a good job with his cuts and can get separation in man coverage... Good runner after the catch due to his speed and quickness, a creative open field runner who can break the big play... Great kickoff return potential; averaged 27.3 yards per kick return in 78 career returns. NEGATIVES -- Has severe injury questions, only played in seven games in 2010 after battling injuries all year and missed games as a senior after sustaining a concussion in a game against Oregon State; never appears fully healthy, suffered three concussions total over a 13 month span... Never dominated Pac-12 competition, had a career high 37 catches for 682 yards and five touchdowns back in 2009 and his production has fallen off the past two years with his injuries... Has the second smallest hands of any receiver at the combine, will have trouble securing the football... A risk-reward player; has the physical ability to be a starter down the line, but he may be out of the league in a year or two as well due to his concussion problems. - Sideline Scouting ----------------------------------------------------------- As you can see, there were many positive things pointed out in these reviews of Chris Owusu. But there was threaded throughout these evaluations a concern about his health, particularly that he suffered three concussions within 13 months -- including two in his last college season. As one evaluator said, Owusu would have received a third round grade except for these concussion concerns. However, two of the three concussions were from blatant helmet-to-helmet hits, and the hits had a sheer magnitude of force that few players would walk away from. Boston University neurosurgeon Robert Cantu has in the past been a vocal critic of the NFL's concussion policies and standards. However, he wanted to make it clear that, he does not believe the number of concussions should make teams worry. He notes that quick recoveries from the concussions (as was the case in all three) are encouraging. "Just because somebody has had more concussions doesn't mean that their future has been doomed in any way, especially if the concussions cleared quickly," However, Chris Owusu has now completed three years in the NFL without any health problems. It is time Chris is no longer overlooked, and is given a fair shot on the playing field. It is time for us to know what we have in him, and if he is a hidden gem.
  12. I do not understand what was odd. Please help me. Thanks
  13. Do We Know What We Have When you see a Football player was an Undrafted Free Agent, most of us would dismiss him as not being very good and unable to contribute significantly to our team. Yet, what if he were a part of the 2015 Wide Receiver draft class, and amongst his peers at the Combine. In the 40 YD DASH he ranked #5 with a time of 4.36 seconds. What if in addition, in the BENCH PRESS he ranked #4 with 19 repetitions. And in the VERT JUMP he was ranked #7 with a jump of 40.5 inches. But that was not all, in the BROAD JUMP he was ranked #5 with a jump of 10'9". And he proved his agility in the 3 CONE DRILL, where he ranked #6 with a time of 6.85 seconds, and in the 20 YD SHUTTLE he was #8 with a time of 4.11 seconds. To top in all off, in the 60 YD SHUTTLE he was #3 with a time of 11.22 seconds. In other words, he was in the top eight in every measurable test at the combine, an athletic freak, who was 6'0" tall and weighted 196 pounds. But there are a lot of athletic freaks, who have fallen flat on their faces in the NFL because they can not catch the ball. Well, according to ProFootballFocus, when he was thrown at, his QB had a rating of 133.5 in the regular 2014 season. Of course, that does not mean much since he was only thrown at six time, including 2 deep balls, and made all six receptions (100%) for 78 yards or 13 yards per catch. In 2013 while in Tampa Bay he was targeted 18 times and made 13 receptions (72.2%) for 114 yards. For some reason he has never been used very much, could it be because he is an UDFA. The one game in which he saw the most action last year was described by John B on Gang Green Nation: "In the first quarter he made a beautiful leaping catch against double coverage for a 36 yard gain. He finished that drive taking a pitch from Geno Smith around right end 23 yards to the corner of the end zone for a touchdown. He did a nice job on the run setting up Dolphins safety Jordan Kovacs, baiting a bad angle and then changing direction. He then returned the second half kickoff 87 yards, making himself small slipping through a small crease in the blocking and exploding through it." Yes, besides being a WR, he is also a good kick returner. In college, he posted a healthy 27.3 yard average on kickoff returns and took 3 of his 78 returns for touchdowns. In the NFL he has only been assigned to run back three kickoffs. One was the above 87 yard return. Another went for 45 with Tampa Bay. So why was Chris Owusu an Undrafted Free Agent? Is he stupid and can not learn the route tree? No he is very smart. He attended Stanford (the Harvard of the West), majoring in biology with a 3.2 grade point average and does not seem to have any drug or other major character concerns. So perhaps the write-ups from before the 2012 draft might help us to understand why he seems to be underrated, ignored and dismissed: STRENGTHS Owusu is a smart receiver who runs routes well and knows how to get defensive backs to turn their hips to be able to stick his foot in the ground suddenly and gain separation. He has a decent sized frame and can use it to his advantage in traffic. He will go up for the ball in traffic and use his hands to catch the ball away from his body and bring it in. He is a threat after the catch with the ball in his hands, and it shows in his return skills, where he is a threat to take it the distance. WEAKNESSES There is some concern around Owusu's concussions, which kept him out for the better part of his senior season. Chris will have to show NFL teams he has recovered from the repeated blows and can return a strong player. His greatest value is as a returner, where he will get the job done but could struggle at the next level to be highly effective as he has only above-average speed and will have a tougher time taking it the distance against the pros. OVERVIEW Owusu has been a reliable receiver and return threat for Stanford throughout his career, who faced an unfortunate set of injuries in his senior season that could severely hurt his draft status going into 2012. With the current attention being given to concussions and the "return-to-play" protocols, teams will have a tough time justifying Owusu as he recovers from a concussion-laden senior season. Despite these red flags, Owusu is a mature player on the field who would be a reliable return option when healthy. - NFL.com ---------------------------------------- A well-built wide out prospect with a strong frame and physical element to his play. Is tighter in the hips, but displays enough short area quickness off the line with and good use of his hands to keep defenders from getting into his frame and avoiding the press. Knows how to keep himself clean and will get physical vs. the jam. Is a natural starter who accelerates quickly down the field and can create initial separation behind defenders. Possesses good ball skills and awareness when asked to locate and run, is willing to go up and high point the play and is above average for his size in jump ball situations. Displays a real savvy about his game as well, does a nice job stemming his route, using subtle head/shoulder fakes to set up routes and keeps corners off balance. Really sells the double move and accelerates quickly once he gains a step. Displays a good feel for zone coverage as well, works to find soft spots and plucks away from his frame. Can be dangerous after the catch. Isn’t real shifty in tight areas and lacks the wiggle to routinely breakdown defenders and make a man miss. However, he runs hard, plants his foot in the ground with natural balance -even at full speed- and can explode toward daylight. Lacks elite top end speed, but runs well, looks like a 4.45-4.5 guy. Isn’t the most fluid of sharply breaking route runners. Is routinely forced to gear down, chops his feet in order to gain balance and doesn’t create much separation. Doesn’t waste much space out of his breaks and is a sharp route runner, just doesn’t have much of a burst when looking to gain initial separation. Adds some special teams play as a kick return man. Sets up blocks well, is a good decision maker and runs hard to daylight. Isn’t a dynamic make you miss athlete, but takes care of the football and is a solid return option. Impression: A bit linear of an athlete. However, is a natural pass catcher with good straight-line speed and a real savvy about his game. Will find a way to contribute to an NFL receiving core as a solid secondary option. - National FootBall Post ------------------------------------------- "Lean, muscular, athletic “X” receiver who has been a playmaker as a receiver and return man when healthy and will be a pro. However, his ceiling is a bit of an unknown, as he has been affected by injuries dating back to high school. Accelerates off the snap, sells routes and uncovers in zone windows. Is mentally and physically tough, takes care of his body and shows good functional strength off the line of scrimmage and after the catch. - Pro FootBall Weekly ----------------------------------------- POSITIVES -- Lit up the combine, was one of the fastest players in attendance; a terrific overall athlete, had a 40.5" vertical and can really go up and high point the football... Great lower body explosion, really accelerates quickly and gets up field in a hurry... Although not big, he has a nice build, appears to have a strong upper body and put up 19 reps of 225 pounds at the combine... Does a good job fighting off press coverage, uses his strength to his advantage and is tough to jam with his initial quickness... Does a good job of catching the ball with his arms extended and doesn't let the ball get into his body... Solid route runner, does a good job with his cuts and can get separation in man coverage... Good runner after the catch due to his speed and quickness, a creative open field runner who can break the big play... Great kickoff return potential; averaged 27.3 yards per kick return in 78 career returns. NEGATIVES -- Has severe injury questions, only played in seven games in 2010 after battling injuries all year and missed games as a senior after sustaining a concussion in a game against Oregon State; never appears fully healthy, suffered three concussions total over a 13 month span... Never dominated Pac-12 competition, had a career high 37 catches for 682 yards and five touchdowns back in 2009 and his production has fallen off the past two years with his injuries... Has the second smallest hands of any receiver at the combine, will have trouble securing the football... A risk-reward player; has the physical ability to be a starter down the line, but he may be out of the league in a year or two as well due to his concussion problems. - Sideline Scouting ----------------------------------------------------------- As you can see, there were many positive things pointed out in these reviews of Chris Owusu. But there was treaded throughout these evaluations a concern about his health, particularly that he suffered three concussions within 13 months -- including two in his last college season. As one evaluator said, Owusu would have received a third round grade except for these concerns. However, Chris Owusu has now completed three years in the NFL without any health problems. It is time Chris is no longer overlooked, and is given a fair shot on the playing field. It is time for us to know what we have in him.
  14. From ProFootballFocus Steve Johnson split No. 3 duties with Brandon Lloyd behind Anquan Boldin and Michael Crabtree, finishing just behind Lloyd, fourth in total snaps in the group with 305 on the season. Letting Johnson go could free up more than $6m of cap space. Johnson was only targeted 49 times but brought in 35 of them for 435 yards and three touchdowns, leading to a 102.0 passer rating on throws his way (28th in league). The majority of his work was done in the first half of the season, earning a+7.8 overall grade through Week 7 and seeing most of his chances in that span – 31 targets in those games as opposed to just 18 from that point on. His season effectively ended in Week 14 as he was counted out for each of the final three contests with a knee injury. A joy to watch as a route runner, Johnson’s creativity and ability to work for leverage on coverage defenders sets him apart and his 2.13 Yards Per Route Run in limited work last season still ranked among the league’s Top 20 receivers. Running only 33% of his routes from the slot in SF (Boldin dominated that role) but more than 70% in his final season in Buffalo, Johnson could find a fit in that spot at his next stop. Last year PFF had him ranked as the #22 WR, above Deker #24, Harvin #34, Mike Wallace #53, Kerley #76 This is why I want him
×
×
  • Create New...