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docdhc

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About docdhc

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  • Birthday 11/27/1957

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  1. Excellent analysis as always. It's amazing what good quarterbacking can do. Watching Geno, Fitz, Petty in past years and then Falk this year makes you jaded, but Sam is so clearly special it is a joy to watch. You have to hope that the defense will also get a big boost when they get Mosely back. An all pro who makes everyone better just like Sam on offense.
  2. The inflammation from the mono should be gone. His chance of rupturing his spleen out there is the same as it was before the illness and the same as anyone else in a contact sport, which is very low. It is a rare injury.
  3. Well feel free. It’s just that the qb you’re judging the offense on will probably never play another meaningful down soon.
  4. Luke Falk is not an NFL QB. Most of those sacks were from him holding the ball too long. We can't judge this team until Sam is back.
  5. They won’t let him play if he’s not ready. Now let’s win and get this damn season started finally!
  6. When a spleen ruptures it can bleed vigorously and patient can die from acute blood loss if not taken quickly to surgery. The pain is not always as intense as a broken rib and may be ignored until too late. I’d rather take my chances with a broken rib.
  7. LINICAL INQUIRIES Chao should stick to orthopedics. 4 weeks from onset of symptoms until risk of splenic rupture is back to baseline. See below: Can we prevent splenic rupture for patients with infectious mononucleosis? J Fam Pract. 2005 June;54(6):536-557 By Brett H. Foreman, MD Leslie Mackler, MSLS Author and Disclosure Information PDF PDF DOWNLOAD EVIDENCE- BASED ANSWER All patients with infectious mononucleosis should be considered at risk for splenic rupture since clinical severity, laboratory results, and physical exam are not reliable predictors of rupture (strength of recommendation [SOR]: B, case-control study). Clinical evidence indicates that most splenic ruptures occur within 4 weeks of symptom onset, which correlates with ultrasound data showing resolution of splenomegaly by 30 days from symptom onset (SOR: B, case-control study). Given the morbidity and mortality associated with splenic rupture, instruct patients to refrain from vigorous physical activity for 1 month after symptom onset (SOR: C, expert opinion). Evidence summary The annual incidence of infectious mononucleosis is somewhere between 345 and 671 cases per 100,000 in the US; it is highest in the adolescent age group.1Splenic rupture is the leading cause of death in infectious mononucleosis, occurring in 0.1% to 0.2% of all cases.1- 4 Based on this figure, approximately 100 cases of rupture may occur yearly in the US, only a few of which are reported. A retrospective analysis of 8116 patients with infectious mononucleosis at the Mayo Clinic estimated the risk of spontaneous splenic rupture to be 0.1% of cases, correlating with rates found in other studies. The study’s criteria for definite spontaneous rupture are: no recent trauma; recent symptoms; hematologic, serologic, and histologic (splenic) evidence of infectious mononucleosis. Five patients with rupture (average age, 22) were identified; 3 were male. Splenectomy was performed for all patients. Follow-up over 33-years found all patients healthy with minimal subsequent illness.3 A review of 55 cases found almost all splenic ruptures occurred between the fourth and twenty-first days of illness, and that all affected spleens were enlarged, although only half were palpable on exam. Ninety percent of the ruptures occurred in males, and more than half were nontraumatic. There was no correlation between severity of illness and susceptibility to splenic rupture. No specifics were given on duration of illness or how splenomegaly was diagnosed.4
  8. By the way, as per following article splenic rupture risk is essentially gone 4 weeks after onset of symptoms. Can we prevent splenic rupture for patients with infectious mononucleosis? J Fam Pract. 2005 June;54(6):536-557 By Brett H. Foreman, MD Leslie Mackler, MSLS Author and Disclosure Information PDF PDF DOWNLOAD EVIDENCE- BASED ANSWER All patients with infectious mononucleosis should be considered at risk for splenic rupture since clinical severity, laboratory results, and physical exam are not reliable predictors of rupture (strength of recommendation [SOR]: B, case-control study). Clinical evidence indicates that most splenic ruptures occur within 4 weeks of symptom onset, which correlates with ultrasound data showing resolution of splenomegaly by 30 days from symptom onset (SOR: B, case-control study). Given the morbidity and mortality associated with splenic rupture, instruct patients to refrain from vigorous physical activity for 1 month after symptom onset (SOR: C, expert opinion). Evidence summary The annual incidence of infectious mononucleosis is somewhere between 345 and 671 cases per 100,000 in the US; it is highest in the adolescent age group.1Splenic rupture is the leading cause of death in infectious mononucleosis, occurring in 0.1% to 0.2% of all cases.1- 4 Based on this figure, approximately 100 cases of rupture may occur yearly in the US, only a few of which are reported. A retrospective analysis of 8116 patients with infectious mononucleosis at the Mayo Clinic estimated the risk of spontaneous splenic rupture to be 0.1% of cases, correlating with rates found in other studies. The study’s criteria for definite spontaneous rupture are: no recent trauma; recent symptoms; hematologic, serologic, and histologic (splenic) evidence of infectious mononucleosis. Five patients with rupture (average age, 22) were identified; 3 were male. Splenectomy was performed for all patients. Follow-up over 33-years found all patients healthy with minimal subsequent illness.3 A review of 55 cases found almost all splenic ruptures occurred between the fourth and twenty-first days of illness, and that all affected spleens were enlarged, although only half were palpable on exam. Ninety percent of the ruptures occurred in males, and more than half were nontraumatic. There was no correlation between severity of illness and susceptibility to splenic rupture. No specifics were given on duration of illness or how splenomegaly was diagnosed.4 FAST TRACK
  9. He can say whatever he wants. He won’t play until his spleen size is back to normal.
  10. I was just thinking I’m glad he’s not our qb taking up that much cap space. I’d much rather have the potential that darnold has for the price but if you want to go on a rant I get it.
  11. I don't agree with this. The Jets were handling Buffalo pretty well until Mosely went out and Sam was already affected by the Mono. Buffalo gave the Pats all they could handle this week. With Mosely back, Sam at full strength and our suspended players like Herndon and Copeland back we can be very competitive, especially when we get past Dallas and New England again.
  12. Imagine how bad it would be around here if Macc had managed to sign this guy! https://bleacherreport.com/articles/2855902-the-minnesota-vikings-have-a-kirk-cousins-problem?utm_source=cnn.com&utm_campaign=editorial&utm_medium=referral Thus far this season, the Minnesota Vikings have paid quarterback Kirk Cousins approximately $7.3 million. And regardless of how he performs, Cousins will continue to earn about $1.8 million per week for the remainder of this season and all of next season. Do the math and Cousins made about $3 million per win during a remarkably disappointing debut season in Minnesota. This year, he's made about $2.4 million per touchdown pass. He has three of those through four games. His team is 2-2 this year, 10-9-1 since it handed the former Washington Redskin a fully guaranteed three-year, $84 million deal in the 2018 offseason. Cousins is approaching the midway point of that contract, and it's become obvious he'll never provide the Vikings with a positive return on their dubious investment. With Minnesota's 16-6 loss to the division-rival Chicago Bears on Sunday at Soldier Field, teams quarterbacked by Cousins are now 4-27 against opponents with winning records. Dylan Buell/Getty Images The Vikes hardly needed him in their two September wins. At home and favored in both cases, they rode running back Dalvin Cook and beat up on the Atlanta Falcons and Oakland Raiders. The 31-year-old signal-caller completed a grand total of 23 passes for 272 yards in those two games. But on the road against higher-quality opponents with substantially higher stakes, Cousins has again failed to be a hero. Two weeks after he completed just 14 of 32 passes and threw two interceptions in a loss to the Green Bay Packers, Cousins averaged just 6.5 yards per pass attempt and took six sacks while generating just one scoring drive all day against Chicago. His passer rating in those two easy wins: 122.0. His passer rating in the two tough losses: 73.4. It's the same horror film, and the most terrifying part is it probably can't end until that boondoggle contract expires in the 2021 offseason. Sunday's performance was actually worse than the numbers indicate. Minnesota didn't score for 57 minutes before finding the end zone in what was essentially garbage time. Cousins has spent much of his career accumulating stats with big leads or deficits, and this was no different. This game was relatively close for three-plus quarters, and Cousins didn't make an impact until it was far too late. 77 people are talking about this He suffered a strip sack on the first play of the third quarter, and he followed that up with four consecutive drives that ended in punts. He had just 133 passing yards prior to that late touchdown drive, and as a team the Vikings had just 182. He was under constant pressure, but he failed to adjust or improve his reaction time, and he was slow to pick up on the Chicago pass rush for all four quarters. The Vikings were admittedly facing one of the NFL's best defenses, but that's still unacceptable when you're trailing for the entire game. Ditto for the fact that Cousins completed just one pass that traveled 15-plus yards and attempted only three. On the first of those three attempts, he overthrew an open Adam Thielen on what would have been a first-quarter touchdown bomb. It wasn't an easy throw, but one you've got to make more often than not when you're the seventh-highest-paid player in NFL history. 2,187 people are talking about this Bad day at the office, but there have been too many of these days for us to give Cousins the benefit of the doubt. He's painfully inconsistent, and the mistakes he makes routinely in the first three quarters usually leave him and his team with no margin for error when games are on the line. And that's why the Vikings failed to make the playoffs despite having the league's fourth-rated defense last season. It's why they're 2-2 this year despite the fact that the D has surrendered 21 or fewer points in all four contests. Including Minnesota, five teams have given up fewer than 16 points per game this season. The other four are a combined 12-4. Only eight teams gave up fewer points than Minnesota did last year, and six of those eight made the playoffs. Essentially, a quarter of the way through Cousins' second season with the Vikings, he's provided substantial proof that his dud first season was no fluke. Fans have already soured on the $84 million man, and his comically low pass attempt total suggests the Vikings coaching staff has also lost faith. He's the highest-paid player of all time who hasn't been to a Super Bowl (he hasn't won a playoff game), and he and Carson Wentz are the only players making that kind of money despite not having played in multiple Pro Bowls. He was a fourth-round pick with obvious flaws coming into the league, and he's since feasted on a few flashes in the pan. "Kirk Cousins, Franchise Quarterback" has never seemed sustainable. And now it's apparent that Minnesota's $84 million experiment is backfiring. Unfortunately for an organization that has already dropped over $30 million into that sinkhole, the Vikings are likely handcuffed to Cousins for another 15 months and $50-odd million. Buyer beware. Better luck in 2021. It's a cold biz.
  13. Put in 50 years and you wouldn’t be wrong!

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