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hmhertz

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Posts posted by hmhertz

  1. 4 hours ago, joewilly12 said:

    Nick Foles is the only remaining option for JD when the Bears cut him or JD trades for him. 

    Trading for Foles is as dumb as drafting James Morgan during the

    year of Covid.

    Why not drive the way back machine and pick up the Honorable

    Joshua Treadwell McCown

    • Upvote 1
  2. I was looking for where I saw Hassell flashing, couldn't

    find the reference but he did make one of the few, or

    any others at all ints Zacherle had in camp. Had he not blocked the Rams

    All Pro punter's punt, I don't we win a game last year.

    The fact that he put up great stats last  year and was

    a finalist for Defensive Player of the year, adds to my hope.

    His measurables trumped our former All pro piece of sh!t Jamal Adams

    4.38 forty to 4.56, vertical leap 42'' to Craphead's 33''

  3. Michael Carter

    USATSI_15199672-e1620157562967.jpg

    (Bob Donnan-USA TODAY Sports)

    The outside-zone rushing concept the Jets will run under LaFleur relies on short-area quickness and bursts of speed to get to the edges of the pocket. Carter possesses that skillset, which is why he’s an ideal fit in this offense. He posted the 10th-best 10-yard split at 1.65 seconds, per Nania, and his smaller frame will give him an advantage in avoiding defenders he wouldn’t have if he ran inside.

    Carter is also a big-play threat on the ground, which is important in this offense. For reference, the 49ers were second in 2019 with 16 rushing plays of at least 20 yards. Carter ranked first in college football with 23 such plays. Carter also finished in the 95th percentile in yards after contact with 4.47, according to Nania.

    Carter won’t be the feature back for the Jets, but that’s alright. Three running backs have at least 200 snaps in the 49ers offense since 2019, and the Jets certainly have the makings of a solid running back committee with Carter joining Tevin Coleman, Ty Johnson, Josh Adams and La’Mical Perine. One of those players will likely be the odd-man out, though the Jets could keep all four but deploy just three consistently.

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    RB Michael Carter

    USATSI_15199672-e1620157562967.jpg

    (Bob Donnan-USA TODAY Sports)

    The outside-zone rushing concept the Jets will run under LaFleur relies on short-area quickness and bursts of speed to get to the edges of the pocket. Carter possesses that skillset, which is why he’s an ideal fit in this offense. He posted the 10th-best 10-yard split at 1.65 seconds, per Nania, and his smaller frame will give him an advantage in avoiding defenders he wouldn’t have if he ran inside.

    Carter is also a big-play threat on the ground, which is important in this offense. For reference, the 49ers were second in 2019 with 16 rushing plays of at least 20 yards. Carter ranked first in college football with 23 such plays. Carter also finished in the 95th percentile in yards after contact with 4.47, according to Nania.

    Carter won’t be the feature back for the Jets, but that’s alright. Three running backs have at least 200 snaps in the 49ers offense since 2019, and the Jets certainly have the makings of a solid running back committee with Carter joining Tevin Coleman, Ty Johnson, Josh Adams and La’Mical Perine. One of those players will likely be the odd-man out, though the Jets could keep all four but deploy just three consistently.

     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Force_Crater


     
  4. 4 hours ago, Sperm Edwards said:

    If everyone cared - or cared enough - the average score would be higher. The best training to take it, off the bat, probably isn’t even getting tutored briefly in practicing the type of questions they ask. Rather, it’s knowing when to skip one because - even if you’re able to figure out or calculate the answer correctly - it’s not worth it on a timed test where each correct answer is worth the same. 

    It explains how some reputedly brainy QBs - e.g. Peyton Manning, or whomever - only got such mediocre scores. Some can’t accept the “defeat” of not getting any/every question right & stay on it too long. His score was a meh 28, but for all we know he didn’t get any wrong, and merely took so much time on a couple questions that he never even saw the last 22 questions. So did he get 20 wrong, or did he not even see 20 questions, with some of those he never saw of the, “What day of the week begins with w?” variety? 

    If the Qs were nothing but 5 (or even 10) second & lower questions (even if some fast-answer ones weren’t fast because they’re stupidly easy), then I think it’d translate to the field better. What problem-solving endeavor does one face on a football field where you’re still successful if you “solve” the problem in 30-60 seconds? On the field it’s not merely about whether he can figure out what he’s seeing; it’s whether he can see it quickly. e.g QBs have a few seconds standing at the line to diagnose what the D is doing, so it’s not all the 2-3 seconds after the ball’s snapped, but if he needed 60 seconds it’s as valuable as if he needed 60 hours — or if he couldn’t even solve it if given 60 years. 

    If the prospects all were trained to have a 10-second timer internally for this test, to answer or admit defeat for every question, I’m sure the average score would jump by at least 5 points - maybe 10 - even without innately being able to answer one more thing correctly. Or even better, just put all those <5-second questions first, and have them get gradually more difficult, and never bury a quick-answer question in the final 5 that many (and perhaps most) of the test-takers never see before time runs out.

    Absent that, it’s a test in test-taking as much as it is a test in intelligence & knowledge. 

    Peyton Manning graduated Phi  Beta Kappa

    https://www.pbk.org/Members

     

    • Upvote 1
  5. I love carter's ability to cut.

    Reports of his ability to stop and start is BS.

    Good runners never stop, they read the blocking in front of them

    and cut off the blocks, this is precisely what Carter does

    If a runner comes to a complete stop, he is waiting and inviting

    to be tackled. Ty Johnson has great  speed (timed as fast as 4.26

    in the forty) and power  (27 reps at 225). Included in his fine college

    career were kickoff TD returns of 98 & 100 yds. Perine, Johnson and

    Carter have fine hands. Johnson & Carter should excel in the Zone

    stretch.  Frank Gore or should I say Bore was the most over rated back

    I've seen in my 65+ years of watching this sh*t

     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ty_Johnson_(American_football)

    • Upvote 1
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