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derp

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About derp

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  • Birthday 02/22/1989

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  1. I think some form of variation of the 4-2-5 makes a lot of sense as a base defense and have appreciated your posts on the topic. That said, its mind boggling how many off ball LB’s the Jets have. Doesn’t seem super indicative of going in that direction yet.
  2. I think that’s the issue with him asking for this extension after three years. The Jets have three, frankly four years of control over him at figures well below the $17M being discussed in your back and forth. The benefit to the team of the extension is the additional years of control and there’s little to no amount of additional years of having him under contract in a four or five year extension scenario. It really doesn’t make financial sense, especially when you’re considering how much more he’s going to be making in the first few years than he would have. The issue is that he’s upset he’s underpaid but he also wants to sign a huge deal as the top safety. Douglas can make a responsible decision to pay him more in the short term in exchange for additional control - but a reasonable deal that gets him a raise and makes sense for the team financially won’t hit the figures he’s looking for. And the huge deal is so far above and beyond what he’s making, plus they control him for for long enough - so there’s really no way to make that work this offseason. Thus why extending next year is probably what they’re targeting at the numbers he’s looking for. My guess is Adams is coming to the table with no leverage, being told he has no leverage and has to not sign a top safety in the league deal or wait a year, and then throwing a hissy fit because there’s nothing else he can do - even though extensions are this stage are rare.
  3. And is down to 245 pounds. Maybe he could switch to strong safety?
  4. I mean 3-32 is, while not exactly 4-45, basically right there to the point of being basically identical. It's 8.9% vs. 9.4% - the closest you could get to the 4-45 pace with 32 picks. Further - the four players re-signed were good Jets and were in the NFL 10+ years. Enunwa's career is over and Winters may not be a Jet by the time football is being played again. Jenkins is the only one who seems to even be on pace to have a career as good as the four in the OP. And the Jets got a huge haul back for Keyshawn that ended up being a huge part of setting the team up for early-mid 2000's success. Leonard WIlliams and Darron Lee were traded but both for pennies on the dollar because they didn't live up to their draft position. And my point was not even that 3-32 was worse - though I kind of think it was. But the team has horrible draft history within the last few years - why go back to the horrible drafting of 1995-1999? The recent examples are comparably awful and much more relevant to the current state of the franchise.
  5. From 2013-2016 (first two years of Maccagnan which are the only ones you can really evaluate to this point and the two Idzik years) the Jets drafted 32 players. Only three are still with the Jets. Of those three - one is on a one year deal, one is likely done playing due to a neck injury, and one is a potential cap casualty. Those are the only three to earn second contracts. Only fourteen of the 32 are still in or close to the NFL in any capacity - counting guys like Charone Peake who was recently signed to a reserve/futures deal and then waived shortly after. Six of the fourteen are 2016 draft picks. Two first round picks (Pryor, Milliner), two second round picks (Hackenberg, Amaro), and two third round picks (Mauldin, McDougle) are among the 18 out of the league. Of the nine players drafted in 2017 only two (Adams, Maye) are still with the Jets and four are out of the league. So good chance this doesn’t improve much one more draft in.
  6. I mean I'd take him regardless too but I wouldn't expect it. I think in terms of likelihood of having a given number of receivers on the field for the Jets - 3>2>4>5>1. Think they're trying to build an outside group distinct from a slot group. If Mims or Perriman gets used as a big slot this year and does well I'd change my perspective from a likelihood standpoint. Would gladly be wrong about them taking Terry if Perriman's back - and I'd rather have Terry than Perriman. I just don't know if they keep investing outside if Perriman gets signed longer term after this season. I can't see them going empty a whole lot and in addition to Gase being a big TE guy I think Darnold loves throwing to the tight end too so I can't really argue with making sure those guys are on the field. On that note - this TE class projects to be good, Herndon hasn't proven he can stay on the field - and even if he has they run 12 enough that I think it's a sleeper position to get addressed this draft.
  7. Same general idea I said more but I'd love Waddle too. I am almost undoubtedly wrong but in my opinion the Jets want to run a lot of 11 and 12 personnel and have the slot be the focal point of the offense. Crowder is steady in that role, but I suspect they'd like a more explosive player to be the centerpiece of the offense and to run that guy out of the slot. Spread the field vertically with big, fast outside receivers and from the slot as well but also find creative guys to get your slot the ball. Seam stretcher at tight end too, pass to set up the run, and you're set. Less investment in the outside guys and more volatility out there because of it, but if they're capable deep threats then they open things up underneath for a lot of guys and create big plays when defenses don't pay enough attention. Win-win. I think Terry is underrated as well. Would be really happy with him if Perriman goes and they continue to build the outside group.
  8. What's the contract? What's the trade compensation? I'd rather sign him for 4/$50M than trade him for a second round pick, but I'd rather trade him for two first round picks than sign him for 5/$90M.
  9. I’d be really curious to know how the locker room feels about this. I feel like the dudes who are leaders understand how leverage and negotiations work, quietly get their deal done, and go about their business. How often do you see guys get into contract disputes and then go on and everything’s rosy? Regardless of where they land, really.
  10. The Jets have Adams under control for a reasonable salary over the next two years. They can also franchise him after that - the franchise tag for safeties was $11.5M this past year. Say it grows to $12.5M two tags from now. Cap hits if he gets franchised aggregate out to roughly $30M over three years. That includes $3.5M in prorated bonus so let’s call their current control three years, $27M. I think can extend that further out, too - if the new CBA tag rules changed then I’m wrong here and I apologize. But I believe the second franchise tag gets a 20% raise. A third would be the greater of a 44% raise or the quarterback tag - obviously the quarterback tag. If we hit the $12.5M with 20% we get to $15M, and the quarterback tag was $27M - let’s say it’s $35M by then. I think this is all conservative, who knows what happens with salaries. So the Jets can hang on to Adams - if he plays nicely (which he won’t) for 2/$14M, 3/$27M, 4/$42M, or 5/$77M - continue tagging if they want. That’s obviously not what I think will or should happen, but they’re important benchmarks when you look at the negotiations from Douglas’ standpoint. I suspect there are two benchmarks for Adams. Eddie Jackson is currently the highest paid safety - four years, $58.4M ($14.6M annually). And CJ Mosley is the highest paid Jet - five years, $85M ($17M annually). Given Adams feels that he’s an elite player in the NFL and the best player on the Jets I imagine he wants to exceed both and that is where his current demands are. In a negotiation you certainly have to start north of where you want to end up anyway. I think Douglas is a very practical guy and Adams cares about the optics of the deal. He wants to be paid - probably as the highest paid Jet, certainly the highest paid safety. And I think the divide there is too big. I don’t see Douglas straying too far from what he can control Adams for already. This is a way easier negotiation when the Jets don’t have him under control for $3.5M the following year. The 2/$14M, 3/$27M, 4/$42M, or 5/$77M above becomes 1/$10M, 2/$23M, 3/$38M or 4/$73M. Highest paid safety money starts to make more financial sense for the team. An extension now doesn’t benefit the team other than shutting Adams up...until he feels he’s underpaid again. Which is the issue with guys who negotiate through the media, hold out, etc. Couple safeties get paid more and I imagine he’ll want a new deal again. Adams has so little leverage right now - particularly with the holding out rules. To me it’s better to sit quietly, play better next year, and earn an even bigger contract than you would’ve gotten next year when you have a way better negotiating position. I’m sure he’s not endearing himself to anyone. I get why he wants the deal now but I have no clue why any of this is surprising.
  11. This argument makes a lot of sense to me - which is my major concern with the validity of the point. You and I are individuals behind keyboards. If we think splitting Bell out and using him more in the passing game was the most effective way to use him - wouldn’t most all opposing NFL coaches be aware of that? Maybe it is that simple. But I’m at least a little skeptical. If Bell’s not going to beat you in the running game - why not focus on him in the passing game? Essentially defending the offense the Jets put out last year was don’t let Robby Anderson beat you downfield and pay attention to Bell and Crowder short. Hopefully the addition of more playmakers helps (and continues).
  12. Taken one pick after ArDarius Stewart. Jets also have Jordan Wills from that round and briefly had Davis Webb too. Decided not to trade up for Kamara and the big miss was passing on Chris Godwin.
  13. I think that’s a pretty reasonable take. Negotiations are hard. Right now the Jets can control him for what - three more seasons at a total of like $29-32M allowing for a $12M-$15M range for the 2022 safety franchise tag (2020 was like $11.5M). Maybe less on the tag if revenues cause the cap to drop? Say his fair market value is at highest paid safety, $15M - which is probably in between his asking price and what the Jets are offering. If the Jets offer him a four year, $60M extension right now there basically gaining a year of team control that they’re paying about $30M for. It just doesn’t really make sense. I’d guess they’re willing to go like four years, $50M which gives him two years of raises and still makes that fourth year of control expensive. And I’m positive he rejects that. It’d be easier after this season when there’s one year less of control and a four year, $60M extension essentially amounts to two years and $35-$38M of new money which is a little more palatable. But I’m not sure he even takes that and the damage is probably going to be done by then since he’s an emotional guy and not shy about speaking his mind. If there’s a season it’ll be interesting to see if he keeps his level of play and if he’s the leader of the defense or if it ends up being Mosley.
  14. I think he’s asking to at least be paid as the top safety in the league. Probably more because he feels he’s just an elite player regardless of position.

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