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Reason #1 Why the new stadium sucks


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It takes FOREVER to get in and out. they built it after 9/11. New Yankee and Citifiled can be evacuated in under 8 minutes. In an emergency Metlife sh*thouse takes over 45 minutes wiht no real emergency. WTF were the planners and architects DOING when they built it?

'Lone wolf' a big threat to spectators

Updated Sep 5, 2011 4:44 PM ET

A decade’s worth of pat downs, metal detectors and Las Vegas-like video surveillance has made the millions of fans who stream into stadiums and arenas around the nation less at risk of a terrorist attack.

The same league executives, law- enforcement officials and independent security experts who make that assertion agree, however, that a new threat presents a challenge to fan safety: the lone wolf.

In the wake of 9/11, sports fans today have to walk through metal detectors and put up with other security measures to ensure safety at events that draw huge numbers of spectators and plenty of attention.

Craig Mitchelldyer

“We had the attacks of 9/11 where it was al Qaeda, an organized terrorist group,” NFL Director of Strategic Security Jeff Miller told FOXSports.com. “Now, if you look across the landscape you see the greatest threat to mass gatherings in the United States is the homegrown violent extremist. This is somebody who is off (law enforcement’s) grid and through the use of propaganda on the Internet is encouraged to act out.” (So Jeff, why did you allow the Jets and Giant to build a huge bottleneck clustef___ of a stadium, and then give them a Super Bowl?)

It’s a threat that the NFL — which has scheduled most of its teams to open regular-season play on Sunday, the 10-year anniversary of the terror attacks — and other leagues really began to hone in on since Faisal Shahzad, an American immigrant from Pakistan, attempted to set off a car bomb in Times Square in May 2010. The makeshift bomb inside Shahzad’s vehicle did not detonate, but reverberations were felt nonetheless.

“We certainly have reason to be concerned about improvised explosive devices entering one of our stadiums,” said Earnell Lucas, Major League Baseball’s senior director of security and facility management. “One person can have a device packed into a vehicle or bring an explosive device or harmful substance into a facility. This is something we look for every day to ensure our fans, players, coaches and umpires are protected in the post-9/11 world.”

Miller said that the NFL has not been told about a “specific credible threat to any of our stadiums.” A spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security refused to comment for this story.

The intelligence gathering and sharing process established in the months after the attacks on World Trade Center and Pentagon continues. League and stadium officials continually receive terror-related briefings from federal authorities, and they work closely with the Joint Terrorism Task Force, which pulls from agencies like the FBI along with state and local authorities. Conferences are offered on a regular basis at which experts from around the world gather to share new ideas to keep fans safe.

“Before 9/11, we did not have these measures in place,” said Maj. Kevin A. Putnam, who heads the special-operations division of the Prince George’s County (Md.) police that patrols the Washington Redskins’ FedEx Field. “We work with our federal partners, receive intelligence briefings and share information about a potential threat. We’re definitely safer in my opinion.”

No games have been canceled as a result of any threats since play resumed after 9/11, and the last terror-related attack on a US sporting event was carried out at the Atlanta Summer Olympics 15 years ago. (The bomb left in a backpack by domestic terrorist Eric Robert Rudolph killed two and injured more than 100.)

Joel Henry Hinrichs III, an engineering student at the University of Oklahoma, detonated a backpack bomb not far from a packed Oklahoma Memorial Stadium as the Sooners played Kansas State in 2005. Only Hinrichs died, and authorities did not consider it a terrorist act since they determined he was not motivated to harm others.

Stadiums and arenas — especially during major events like the Super Bowl and World Series — do make attractive targets for terrorists. For that reason, metal detectors are used more frequently, perimeters around the stadiums are widened, no-fly zones are implemented and leagues employ a more stringent credentialing process.

But former New York and Los Angeles police chief William Bratton said fans need only look next to them in the stands or scan the parking lot to eye a more imminent threat.

“The fact remains that the issue for most fans is the potential for fan-on-fan violence,” said Bratton, chairman of Kroll Inc., a risk-management company. “But even with the sheer magnitude of gangs who go to organized sporting events in this country, the number of incidents that make news on the local or national level are minimal. You could probably count them on one hand.”

Bratton was hired as a consultant by the Los Angeles Dodgers in the aftermath of one of the most brutal fan assaults in memory. San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow was left with serious brain injuries after an attack outside Dodger Stadium in April. Last month, two people were shot after an Oakland Raiders-San Francisco 49ers preseason game, and another was assaulted in the bathroom during the same game; two of the three were left with serious injuries.

MLB has used the resident security agents — off-duty law enforcement officers — since 1986. Duties for each agent ranged from policing tobacco use in the minor leagues to ensuring the overall safety of those at the ballpark. After 9/11, the security agents began to receive terrorism training.

In the NFL, a text-messaging system has been put in place so unruly fans can be reported to security. While often used to report binge-drinkers who have lost control, Miller said the system could also be utilized to flag possible terrorist activity.

“We need fans who come out to our venues to tell law enforcement if they see something that’s unusual or makes them feel uncomfortable,” said Miller, a former commissioner of the Pennsylvania State Police. “Every US citizen should have a sense of their own surroundings and take personal responsibility for their own safety and security and that of their neighbors.”

United front

NASCAR has a way of showing its American pride.

The more invasive security measures have met with some resistance. Lawsuits were brought by fans in San Francisco, Seattle and Tampa Bay after the NFL first mandated teams subject fans to pat downs in 2005, although the searches were upheld in each instance by either state or federal judges.

“There is generally a feeling of acceptance to the fact that we need to take certain steps to ensure fan safety,” Miller said. “It’s a free society and you can’t shut down every (terrorist) opportunity because people are always moving around and we have a Constitution. So, we have to do things a certain way from a law-enforcement perspective.”

That means longer lines as purses and backpacks are checked. Fans at some stadiums may be able to bring their sandwiches from home only in a clear bag instead of a paper one. Cars entering parking structures may be randomly searched.

“The good news is that security is getting better,” Bratton said. “The American sport experience is largely a safe one, and there are a lot of people out there focused on making it safer.”

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i finally went to the new stadium for the Philly preseason game and it was pretty smooth sailing getting in and out. i actually liked it a lot. And im sorry but in a REAL emergency i highly doubt it takes 8 minutes to evacuate 80,000 screaming and panicked people...

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I've been to several sellouts at new Yankee. There are exits everywhere. It's very open and sensibly designed-the exact opposite of Metlife. May be they're optimistice about 8 minutes, but it probably wouldn't take more than 10-12 minutes.

Jetlife by contrast is a claustrophobic's nightmare that seems to have been designed without taking moving crowds in and out into any consideration. All they gave a sh*t about was luxury boxes and crappy concessions. HEck, they didn't even make the bathrooms any better.really that thye could build a new stadium that has a worse bathroom setup is really beyond understanding. The one good thing about the old place was the spirals-cememt and rybar, very low tech, and very effective to get people out. Because the Jets freaked out about the halftime fun there were no spirals in the new place.

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I'll believe they can evacuate Yankee Stadium or Citfield in 8 minutes when I see it.

Hopefully, I won't ever have to.

Yeah, get a guy to run onto the field with a bombvest and bearhug Swisher until the bleacher people have meaty hunks of Swish souvenirs and lets see how that 8 minute evacuation works out.

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I've been to several sellouts at new Yankee. There are exits everywhere. It's very open and sensibly designed-the exact opposite of Metlife. May be they're optimistice about 8 minutes, but it probably wouldn't take more than 10-12 minutes.

Jetlife by contrast is a claustrophobic's nightmare that seems to have been designed without taking moving crowds in and out into any consideration. All they gave a sh*t about was luxury boxes and crappy concessions. HEck, they didn't even make the bathrooms any better.really that thye could build a new stadium that has a worse bathroom setup is really beyond understanding. The one good thing about the old place was the spirals-cememt and rybar, very low tech, and very effective to get people out. Because the Jets freaked out about the halftime fun there were no spirals in the new place.

I actually think the new bathrooms are MUCH better in this stadium. I agree to an extent about the traffic flow, they seem to want everyone to leave from the same exit at the 50 but that is how I determined what tickets to buy. Lower level, right by the exit and easy access to a gate\exit.

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There's no way that Yankee Stadium empties out in 8 minutes. I can already see security holding all the poor people in the obstructed view seats because the Legends Bowl people wouldn't have gathered up all their free souvenirs yet.

Yeah if they can get Godzilla to come over and shake it out upside down.

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It takes FOREVER to get in and out. they built it after 9/11. New Yankee and Citifiled can be evacuated in under 8 minutes. In an emergency Metlife sh*thouse takes over 45 minutes wiht no real emergency. WTF were the planners and architects DOING when they built it?

Tell us how you really feel... and FWIW I could beat the "can be" time of Yankee from my seats in Metlife Stadium.

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i finally went to the new stadium for the Philly preseason game and it was pretty smooth sailing getting in and out. i actually liked it a lot. And im sorry but in a REAL emergency i highly doubt it takes 8 minutes to evacuate 80,000 screaming and panicked people...

al Qaeda fears the Linc.

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I don't know whether evacuating quickly is something i think of when i go to a stadium. Its not possible.

I guess when you go to a place with 80000 people all i expect is a stampede or two (unfortunately) in case of emergency!

I have not been to the new place so do not have an opinion as yet.

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I don't know whether evacuating quickly is something i think of when i go to a stadium. Its not possible.

I guess when you go to a place with 80000 people all i expect is a stampede or two (unfortunately) in case of emergency!

I have not been to the new place so do not have an opinion as yet.

I don't really care about the dire emergency as much as I care about getting the **** out of the stadium in under 30minutes just because I have other things to do. Like get home and come here to complain about Shotty.

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I actually think the new bathrooms are MUCH better in this stadium. I agree to an extent about the traffic flow, they seem to want everyone to leave from the same exit at the 50 but that is how I determined what tickets to buy. Lower level, right by the exit and easy access to a gate\exit.

Agree about the bathrooms. There is room for at least three guys in each stall, especially if one kneeling. Kudos to the architect!

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If you're going to subject fans to that kind of scrutiny to get in the parking lot, can we at least get a break on the inexplicable barriers and closed stairnwells inside?Instead of employing a mess of people in yellow shirts to direct you inside, how about putting half those people at the trunsitles? Alas the Jets and NJSEA are determined to make watching the game from your couch or a bar as preferable.Might have been a better idea to ask the NFL nost to schedule the Jets for 9/11.

And to the security DICKS on the 200 level who INTENTIONALLY put police horses and barriers in front of people leaving for no discernible reason-words fails me without profanity.Why would you do that? Utterly pointless.

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If you're going to subject fans to that kind of scrutiny to get in the parking lot, can we at least get a break on the inexplicable barriers and closed stairnwells inside?Instead of employing a mess of people in yellow shirts to direct you inside, how about putting half those people at the trunsitles? Alas the Jets and NJSEA are determined to make watching the game from your couch or a bar as preferable.Might have been a better idea to ask the NFL nost to schedule the Jets for 9/11.

And to the security DICKS on the 200 level who INTENTIONALLY put police horses and barriers in front of people leaving for no discernible reason-words fails me without profanity.Why would you do that? Utterly pointless.

You are jinxed... I got out fine last night even with one path blocked... and leaving was not bad considering everyone stayed until the end.

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If you're going to subject fans to that kind of scrutiny to get in the parking lot, can we at least get a break on the inexplicable barriers and closed stairnwells inside?Instead of employing a mess of people in yellow shirts to direct you inside, how about putting half those people at the trunsitles? Alas the Jets and NJSEA are determined to make watching the game from your couch or a bar as preferable.Might have been a better idea to ask the NFL nost to schedule the Jets for 9/11.

And to the security DICKS on the 200 level who INTENTIONALLY put police horses and barriers in front of people leaving for no discernible reason-words fails me without profanity.Why would you do that? Utterly pointless.

I am not the biggest fan of the new stadium, especially trying to get out of it after a game, but I cannot knock them for being overly secure at yesterdays game. So I had to wait a little longer to get in the lot or the guards patting your down at the gates were a little more 'friendly' than usual. If that is what it takes to keep it safe, its well worth it.

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I am not the biggest fan of the new stadium, especially trying to get out of it after a game, but I cannot knock them for being overly secure at yesterdays game. So I had to wait a little longer to get in the lot or the guards patting your down at the gates were a little more 'friendly' than usual. If that is what it takes to keep it safe, its well worth it.

I walked right in to the Pepsi gate at 7pm... no line... and on the way out I never had to stop... so I could leave as fast as I wanted... we stopped by the SNY set... there was a log jam getting out of the lot but who doesn't expect 15 min of traffic?

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I walked right in to the Pepsi gate at 7pm... no line... and on the way out I never had to stop... so I could leave as fast as I wanted... we stopped by the SNY set... there was a log jam getting out of the lot but who doesn't expect 15 min of traffic?

I went in the Verizon gate at around 7:15 and there was a small line, nothing crazy. I did hear a lot of people in my section who came in later complaining about long lines at the gates, but that will happen when you decide to head in last minute.

You are lower level so your exit is probably a lot easier, leaving from the mezz you hit a log-jam as people from the lower level start pouring out onto the ramps. If I had the chance I would chage my seats to lower level endzone, which is the same ticket price/psl as what I pay for now in the mezz

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I went in the Verizon gate at around 7:15 and there was a small line, nothing crazy. I did hear a lot of people in my section who came in later complaining about long lines at the gates, but that will happen when you decide to head in last minute.

You are lower level so your exit is probably a lot easier, leaving from the mezz you hit a log-jam as people from the lower level start pouring out onto the ramps. If I had the chance I would chage my seats to lower level endzone, which is the same ticket price/psl as what I pay for now in the mezz

I have used the ramps... more crowded but moving still... the best exit I have found is the Metlife gate... lightning fast to get out from the LL.

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