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Schefter suggests Peyton wants no business with the Jets


BroadwayJ667
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So, considering that Sanchez makes 10M + .. you're advocating we dump him too?

Maybe bring in Henne at 2-3M and use the extra 7M to get us a RT?

I'm not familiar with the going prices of mediocre quarterbacks, but I thought Payton was looking to recieve around $20MM. For that we could keep Sanchez, bring in Henne, AND get a RT.

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I honestly don't want Peyton. He hates us. Honestly I've hated him for so long that it would be hard for me to pull for him. Same with Favre in 2008 all over again. I think we give Sanchez 1 more year under a new OC, but definately bring in some good competition like Case Keenum of the university of Houston to compete with him. Case has like a 2nd or 3rd round grade.

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You might be right, but Peyton had no problem throwing to Collie, and Garcon immediately the produced big things the first year they were used. Also Tom Moore would have to be a package deal with Peyton. This would lead to Rex, Peyton, Moore, Tanny, and Sporano sitting down for about 10 seconds, Rex: Tom Peyton here is the situation build the offense I'll take care of the D, see u in the Super Bowl, Tom, and Peyton, to Sparano, send in a run and a pass play, Peyton will decide what to do based on defense got it, ok now go teach those OL and RB's and get the hell out (of course a little nicer) me and Peyton got work to do, we will let you know what's what later,

Well keep in mind Collie and Garcon stepped into an already estasblished offense run by a QB who had a grasp on both sytem and players for about 7 or 8 years Snachez is certainly NOT at that level and he has not had the same players in his offense for that period of time to develop such a relationship.

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Who knew that Smash was "The Football Scientist." I guess he was right that his knowledge of the game trumps that of the collective children who dare challenge his opinions.

Hey hector I dont care if people challenge my opinions I just get annoyed when people take it to extreme. I could be completely wrong on my views i could be completely right on my views, or I could be somewhere in the middle which is probably the case. But what I get alot of is extreme....people saying I said something I did not like Smash said "Sanchez is going to be a better QB than Manning " or Smash is compareing Sanchez to Manning" which is crap.

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I honestly don't want Peyton. He hates us. Honestly I've hated him for so long that it would be hard for me to pull for him. Same with Favre in 2008 all over again. I think we give Sanchez 1 more year under a new OC, but definately bring in some good competition like Case Keenum of the university of Houston to compete with him. Case has like a 2nd or 3rd round grade.

Why can't McElroy compete with him ? I mean that kid got totally crushed last year in preseason and never had a chance at times but still led a few drives and showed some toughness

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Why can't McElroy compete with him ? I mean that kid got totally crushed last year in preseason and never had a chance at times but still led a few drives and showed some toughness

Smashmouth has once again taken his predilcition for bad QB's to the extreme

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Smashmouth has once again taken his predilcition for bad QB's to the extreme

I hope he has full autonomy to make a decision at QB, but I have doubts about that. I can easily see us bringing in a Campbell type, him outplaying sanchez and us still going with the model cause he lost two AFC championship games

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I honestly don't want Peyton. He hates us. Honestly I've hated him for so long that it would be hard for me to pull for him. Same with Favre in 2008 all over again. I think we give Sanchez 1 more year under a new OC, but definately bring in some good competition like Case Keenum of the university of Houston to compete with him. Case has like a 2nd or 3rd round grade.

Really? You've hated the greatest Vols player ever? weird.

Smashmouth has once again taken his predilcition for bad QB's to the extreme

I hope he has full autonomy to make a decision at QB, but I have doubts about that. I can easily see us bringing in a Campbell type, him outplaying sanchez and us still going with the model cause he lost two AFC championship games

You gotta admit, his passion for the sh*tty QB is urivaled.

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ESPN Insider: Peyton Manning won't fix the Jets

Peyton Manning won't fix the Jets

The Colts quarterback won't solve the biggest issue facing the Jets offense

By KC Joyner

ESPN Insider

One of the most important elements in Apple's turnaround in the late 1990s was Steve Jobs' superb insight in determining which direction the company should choose to move forward.

At the time he took the company over, Apple had dozens of product versions that were not easily differentiated. Jobs knew that deciding what not to do was just as important as deciding what to do. He realized his approach had to change. He replaced the crowded product line with a simple four-tiered model that required eliminating a large number of computer lines, but the resulting simplicity was invaluable in helping the company focus on its core goals.

The decision-makers in the New York Jets hierarchy would do well to mimic this approach if they are truly serious about pursuing Peyton Manning to take over as their quarterback in 2012.

A move such as this might sound to at least one unnamed player as a surefire recipe to reach the Super Bowl, but there is overwhelming evidence suggesting that this would be the wrong move for the Jets to make.

It all starts by understanding what the Jets' real problems are on offense. A lot has been made about their lack of leadership, and while there looks to be more than a bit of truth in that, the biggest issue with Gang Green's offense is its lack of talent in the receiving corps.

In 2010, New York had a true vertical wide receiver in Braylon Edwards. His 12.7 vertical yards per attempt mark (a metric that measures productivity on passes thrown 11 or more yards downfield) ranked 19th in the league.

His ability to stretch the field also worked wonders for opening the passing game up for New York's other wideouts. For proof, check out the number of receptions of 20 or more yards and 40 or more yards for New York's top receivers in 2010:

• Edwards -- Fourteen plays of 20 or more yards, five plays of 40 or more yards.

• Santonio Holmes -- Eleven plays of 20 or more yards, three plays of 40 or more yards.

• Dustin Keller -- Eleven plays of 20 or more yards, two plays of 40 or more yards.

These performances led to Mark Sanchez having 43 plays of 20 or more yards (a total that ranked tied for 12th in the league) and 10 plays of 40 or more yards (tied for fifth).

Now fast-forward to the Jets' totals in those categories in 2011, a season in which the Jets entrusted their vertical pass receiver spot to the aging Plaxico Burress:

• Burress -- Six plays of 20 or more yards, zero plays of 40 or more yards.

• Holmes -- Eight plays of 20 or more yards, zero plays of 40 or more yards.

• Keller -- Twelve plays of 20 or more yards, one play of 40 or more yards.

These declines resulted in Sanchez's drop-off to only 39 plays of 20 or more yards in 2011, which is more of a significant decrease than the raw numbers show, considering that this was a record-setting passing year across the league. His mark in that category ranked 20th in the league, and his two passes of 40 or more yards ranked dead last.

That Burress wasn't up to this role shouldn't have come as a surprise if one looks at his historical metrics. In his last full season (2007 with the New York Giants), Burress gained only 7.9 YPA on vertical passes.

To put that YPA total into perspective, consider that it ranked 63rd out of 69 qualifying wide receivers that season. In other words, if Burress wasn't a dominant downfield threat then, why would anyone think he could be one today, at 34 years old, after everything that happened to him since then?

If Manning were in his prime, he might be able to work around some of these weaknesses, but just as was the case with Burress, there are multiple signs that Manning's productivity is declining.

In the 2010 season, Manning posted a 9.7 vertical YPA and a 10.7 stretch vertical YPA (stretch vertical being passes thrown 20 or more yards downfield). Both totals were worse than what Sanchez posted that year, and that was with a Colts receiving corps that was much better than the receiving corps the Jets fielded in 2011. It was also before Manning had two more neck surgeries and Holmes went through an implosion as team captain.

The only way Manning could significantly help the Jets is if New York could assure Manning a dramatic improvement in receiving personnel. It will be quite difficult to achieve this goal via the draft, since the Jets won't be in a position to acquire former Oklahoma State wideout Justin Blackmon. Blackmon is, in the eyes of most scouts, the only wide receiver candidate in the draft who looks to have A.J. Green/Julio Jones impact ability from day one.

That leaves leave free agency as the only option for an upgrade. This year's free agent wide receiver crop looks as if it will include Vincent Jackson, DeSean Jackson and Dwayne Bowe, among others, but since New York already invested big money into Holmes' contract last year and would have to find a way to fit Manning's contract under its salary cap, one has to wonder if breaking the bank for a big name wideout would be feasible for the Jets.

Without that kind of upgrade, it would difficult for even the most talented quarterback in the league to turn this offense into a powerhouse. Since Manning looks to have lost that title, it makes the proposition of his joining the Jets one that simply doesn't guarantee an upgrade.

Where have i heard that before ?

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ESPN Insider: Peyton Manning won't fix the Jets

Peyton Manning won't fix the Jets

The Colts quarterback won't solve the biggest issue facing the Jets offense

By KC Joyner

ESPN Insider

One of the most important elements in Apple's turnaround in the late 1990s was Steve Jobs' superb insight in determining which direction the company should choose to move forward.

At the time he took the company over, Apple had dozens of product versions that were not easily differentiated. Jobs knew that deciding what not to do was just as important as deciding what to do. He realized his approach had to change. He replaced the crowded product line with a simple four-tiered model that required eliminating a large number of computer lines, but the resulting simplicity was invaluable in helping the company focus on its core goals.

The decision-makers in the New York Jets hierarchy would do well to mimic this approach if they are truly serious about pursuing Peyton Manning to take over as their quarterback in 2012.

A move such as this might sound to at least one unnamed player as a surefire recipe to reach the Super Bowl, but there is overwhelming evidence suggesting that this would be the wrong move for the Jets to make.

It all starts by understanding what the Jets' real problems are on offense. A lot has been made about their lack of leadership, and while there looks to be more than a bit of truth in that, the biggest issue with Gang Green's offense is its lack of talent in the receiving corps.

In 2010, New York had a true vertical wide receiver in Braylon Edwards. His 12.7 vertical yards per attempt mark (a metric that measures productivity on passes thrown 11 or more yards downfield) ranked 19th in the league.

His ability to stretch the field also worked wonders for opening the passing game up for New York's other wideouts. For proof, check out the number of receptions of 20 or more yards and 40 or more yards for New York's top receivers in 2010:

• Edwards -- Fourteen plays of 20 or more yards, five plays of 40 or more yards.

• Santonio Holmes -- Eleven plays of 20 or more yards, three plays of 40 or more yards.

• Dustin Keller -- Eleven plays of 20 or more yards, two plays of 40 or more yards.

These performances led to Mark Sanchez having 43 plays of 20 or more yards (a total that ranked tied for 12th in the league) and 10 plays of 40 or more yards (tied for fifth).

Now fast-forward to the Jets' totals in those categories in 2011, a season in which the Jets entrusted their vertical pass receiver spot to the aging Plaxico Burress:

• Burress -- Six plays of 20 or more yards, zero plays of 40 or more yards.

• Holmes -- Eight plays of 20 or more yards, zero plays of 40 or more yards.

• Keller -- Twelve plays of 20 or more yards, one play of 40 or more yards.

These declines resulted in Sanchez's drop-off to only 39 plays of 20 or more yards in 2011, which is more of a significant decrease than the raw numbers show, considering that this was a record-setting passing year across the league. His mark in that category ranked 20th in the league, and his two passes of 40 or more yards ranked dead last.

That Burress wasn't up to this role shouldn't have come as a surprise if one looks at his historical metrics. In his last full season (2007 with the New York Giants), Burress gained only 7.9 YPA on vertical passes.

To put that YPA total into perspective, consider that it ranked 63rd out of 69 qualifying wide receivers that season. In other words, if Burress wasn't a dominant downfield threat then, why would anyone think he could be one today, at 34 years old, after everything that happened to him since then?

If Manning were in his prime, he might be able to work around some of these weaknesses, but just as was the case with Burress, there are multiple signs that Manning's productivity is declining.

In the 2010 season, Manning posted a 9.7 vertical YPA and a 10.7 stretch vertical YPA (stretch vertical being passes thrown 20 or more yards downfield). Both totals were worse than what Sanchez posted that year, and that was with a Colts receiving corps that was much better than the receiving corps the Jets fielded in 2011. It was also before Manning had two more neck surgeries and Holmes went through an implosion as team captain.

The only way Manning could significantly help the Jets is if New York could assure Manning a dramatic improvement in receiving personnel. It will be quite difficult to achieve this goal via the draft, since the Jets won't be in a position to acquire former Oklahoma State wideout Justin Blackmon. Blackmon is, in the eyes of most scouts, the only wide receiver candidate in the draft who looks to have A.J. Green/Julio Jones impact ability from day one.

That leaves leave free agency as the only option for an upgrade. This year's free agent wide receiver crop looks as if it will include Vincent Jackson, DeSean Jackson and Dwayne Bowe, among others, but since New York already invested big money into Holmes' contract last year and would have to find a way to fit Manning's contract under its salary cap, one has to wonder if breaking the bank for a big name wideout would be feasible for the Jets.

Without that kind of upgrade, it would difficult for even the most talented quarterback in the league to turn this offense into a powerhouse. Since Manning looks to have lost that title, it makes the proposition of his joining the Jets one that simply doesn't guarantee an upgrade.

How many times did sanchez even attempt to throw deep? We spent all year playing defenses sitting on short stuff with no respect for passing game, Sanchez got skittish and became checkdown charlie.. I could see this point being relative if we actually attempted, but we didn't cause our QB got scared..

He;'s putting Sanchez's regression on the receivers, but I don't think that's conclusive

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Well keep in mind Collie and Garcon stepped into an already estasblished offense run by a QB who had a grasp on both sytem and players for about 7 or 8 years Snachez is certainly NOT at that level and he has not had the same players in his offense for that period of time to develop such a relationship.

I was talking about Peyton Manning if he came to the Jets, with Tom Moore, same system for Peyton, and his ability to instant connect with Collie, and Garcon, so he shouldn't have a problem with insta connect with Holmes Keller and Kerley, not referencing mark Sanchez at all there.

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How many times did sanchez even attempt to throw deep? We spent all year playing defenses sitting on short stuff with no respect for passing game, Sanchez got skittish and became checkdown charlie.. I could see this point being relative if we actually attempted, but we didn't cause our QB got scared..

He;'s putting Sanchez's regression on the receivers, but I don't think that's conclusive

It might not be conclusive, but it does warrant arguing. When both Braylon, and Holmes were here in 10 Sanchez had no problem leading quick drives to win games multiple times when pressed against the clock, without that 2nd deep threat that ability disappeared, coincidence maybe, but I doubt it.

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I don't rely on FO you blockhead, and I wouldn't expect you to understand something as simple as what's being said. Once NO or GB is actually in the SB, against NE, they will be the favorites.. Yes.. The issue is that NE has by far the easier path to the SB, largely because they are getting a bye this week.. lol

And Vegas has to include public sentiment when assigning odds, what they release is a combination of statistical analysis and public sentiment

You got it Glenn. Or is it Joe Brod?

I forget.

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It might not be conclusive, but it does warrant arguing. When both Braylon, and Holmes were here in 10 Sanchez had no problem leading quick drives to win games multiple times when pressed against the clock, without that 2nd deep threat that ability disappeared, coincidence maybe, but I doubt it.

Yah, but Plaxico helped red zone % go up... So 6 of 1, 1/2 dozen of the other... That's basically the only switch, Cotchery was dreadful last year so moving to Kerley didn't have an impact. Santonio's play obviously fell off to... so I'm sure that's a factor as well..

Honestly, theres a ton of reasons that a stat like that would go down. The numbers are the numbers, the analysis is adding context to them. Our run game was worse (partially cause Sanchez sucked), our Oline was worse, Sanchez checked down far more then every (which is illustrated by a higher comp % and lower YPA). All of which put a strain on any kind of down the field passing game. It was pretty clear to me what the primary issue was anyway

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Lup Im not sure why you neg repped me but Favre was hurt pretty bad the last five games of that season and could barely throw the football. I was not Implying Ratliff should have started the season if thats what your thinking. I just didnt like hearing how bad Favre was hurt and our idiot coaching staff not putting in Ratliff anything could have been better than what we saw down the stretch

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I did want to see him get a chance yes I thought he had the tools but having Favre with his arm hanging by a thread was the smarter move by the jets at the time

Favre's arm was fine when we got him, and we were 8-3 until he got hurt, and then had his best season in his career the following year in Minnesota, the Jets took a shot with a healthy Favre, and it was the right move, the wrong move might have been keeping Schotty, and drafting Sanchez, instead of begging Favre to come back with his hand picked O-Coordinator, after our SB parade we watch Favre ride off into the sunset, and sign Jason Cambell to be our game manager with our ground and pound offense, which is lead by LeSean McCoy, who we drafted with our 2nd round pick in 2009 that we traded to Cleveland, and our deep threat WR Percy Harvin who we drafted in the first round of 2009 (I would much rather say Hakeem Nicks, but sense I'm being completely unrealistic in my post I will put one realistic thing in here, the Jets loved Harvin, and would have taken him at 17 if we stayed there).

Ok now someone go get a time machine and makes this happen thanks lol.

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Favre's arm was fine when we got him, and we were 8-3 until he got hurt, and then had his best season in his career the following year in Minnesota, the Jets took a shot with a healthy Favre, and it was the right move, the wrong move might have been keeping Schotty, and drafting Sanchez, instead of begging Favre to come back with his hand picked O-Coordinator, after our SB parade we watch Favre ride off into the sunset, and sign Jason Cambell to be our game manager with our ground and pound offense, which is lead by LeSean McCoy, who we drafted with our 2nd round pick in 2009 that we traded to Cleveland, and our deep threat WR Percy Harvin who we drafted in the first round of 2009 (I would much rather say Hakeem Nicks, but sense I'm being completely unrealistic in my post I will put one realistic thing in here, the Jets loved Harvin, and would have taken him at 17 if we stayed there).

Ok now someone go get a time machine and makes this happen thanks lol.

Lup Im not sure why you neg repped me but Favre was hurt pretty bad the last five games of that season and could barely throw the football. I was not Implying Ratliff should have started the season if thats what your thinking. I just didnt like hearing how bad Favre was hurt and our idiot coaching staff not putting in Ratliff anything could have been better than what we saw down the stretch

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Yah, but Plaxico helped red zone % go up... So 6 of 1, 1/2 dozen of the other... That's basically the only switch, Cotchery was dreadful last year so moving to Kerley didn't have an impact. Santonio's play obviously fell off to... so I'm sure that's a factor as well..

Honestly, theres a ton of reasons that a stat like that would go down. The numbers are the numbers, the analysis is adding context to them. Our run game was worse (partially cause Sanchez sucked), our Oline was worse, Sanchez checked down far more then every (which is illustrated by a higher comp % and lower YPA). All of which put a strain on any kind of down the field passing game. It was pretty clear to me what the primary issue was anyway

Even thou Plax helped in the red zone he did nothing anywhere else, and scared no one deep, which Edwards did, and this kept the deep coverages honest having to be concerned with 2 guys who can beat you deep instead of just one this year. There is a lot of examples from 2010 season of this, Houston, Detroit, Cleveland, and the Colts playoff game, replace Plax for BE and none of this drives are possible late in those games IMO. I'm just saying if we get a 2nd true deep threat it could make a world of difference in the whole offenses performance not just Sanchezs.

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Lup Im not sure why you neg repped me but Favre was hurt pretty bad the last five games of that season and could barely throw the football. I was not Implying Ratliff should have started the season if thats what your thinking. I just didnt like hearing how bad Favre was hurt and our idiot coaching staff not putting in Ratliff anything could have been better than what we saw down the stretch

The negative rep was an accident my thumb hit it on my iPad, yes keeping him in the last 5 weeks was a mistake but getting him in the first place was not, when healthy he was very good here.

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Only reason he wouldn't play here if he is available would be because he wouldn't want to step on Eli's toes, by stealing back pages, and essentially Eli's thunder, this could pose a threat to Eli by putting him deeper in his shadow. The Manning family is very tight I don't think any of them would do anything to another member of the family that could have a negative affect on the other.

I think the financial gains through endorsements by having both in NY could put Eli on board and actually lobby for him in NY, that's the only way I can see Peyton coming here is with Eli's blessing.

Not the best way of putting it I know my brain is in a cloud right now, but I think you can get the gist of it.

That makes sense actually...but I think you nailed it. The endorsement dollars would actually increase with both of them here.

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Lupz27, on 13 January 2012 - 12:57 PM, said:

Only reason he wouldn't play here if he is available would be because he wouldn't want to step on Eli's toes, by stealing back pages, and essentially Eli's thunder, this could pose a threat to Eli by putting him deeper in his shadow. The Manning family is very tight I don't think any of them would do anything to another member of the family that could have a negative affect on the other.

I think the financial gains through endorsements by having both in NY could put Eli on board and actually lobby for him in NY, that's the only way I can see Peyton coming here is with Eli's blessing.

Not the best way of putting it I know my brain is in a cloud right now, but I think you can get the gist of it.

very good post, didnt think of that

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ESPN Insider: Peyton Manning won't fix the Jets

Peyton Manning won't fix the Jets

The Colts quarterback won't solve the biggest issue facing the Jets offense

By KC Joyner

ESPN Insider

One of the most important elements in Apple's turnaround in the late 1990s was Steve Jobs' superb insight in determining which direction the company should choose to move forward.

At the time he took the company over, Apple had dozens of product versions that were not easily differentiated. Jobs knew that deciding what not to do was just as important as deciding what to do. He realized his approach had to change. He replaced the crowded product line with a simple four-tiered model that required eliminating a large number of computer lines, but the resulting simplicity was invaluable in helping the company focus on its core goals.

The decision-makers in the New York Jets hierarchy would do well to mimic this approach if they are truly serious about pursuing Peyton Manning to take over as their quarterback in 2012.

A move such as this might sound to at least one unnamed player as a surefire recipe to reach the Super Bowl, but there is overwhelming evidence suggesting that this would be the wrong move for the Jets to make.

It all starts by understanding what the Jets' real problems are on offense. A lot has been made about their lack of leadership, and while there looks to be more than a bit of truth in that, the biggest issue with Gang Green's offense is its lack of talent in the receiving corps.

In 2010, New York had a true vertical wide receiver in Braylon Edwards. His 12.7 vertical yards per attempt mark (a metric that measures productivity on passes thrown 11 or more yards downfield) ranked 19th in the league.

His ability to stretch the field also worked wonders for opening the passing game up for New York's other wideouts. For proof, check out the number of receptions of 20 or more yards and 40 or more yards for New York's top receivers in 2010:

• Edwards -- Fourteen plays of 20 or more yards, five plays of 40 or more yards.

• Santonio Holmes -- Eleven plays of 20 or more yards, three plays of 40 or more yards.

• Dustin Keller -- Eleven plays of 20 or more yards, two plays of 40 or more yards.

These performances led to Mark Sanchez having 43 plays of 20 or more yards (a total that ranked tied for 12th in the league) and 10 plays of 40 or more yards (tied for fifth).

Now fast-forward to the Jets' totals in those categories in 2011, a season in which the Jets entrusted their vertical pass receiver spot to the aging Plaxico Burress:

• Burress -- Six plays of 20 or more yards, zero plays of 40 or more yards.

• Holmes -- Eight plays of 20 or more yards, zero plays of 40 or more yards.

• Keller -- Twelve plays of 20 or more yards, one play of 40 or more yards.

These declines resulted in Sanchez's drop-off to only 39 plays of 20 or more yards in 2011, which is more of a significant decrease than the raw numbers show, considering that this was a record-setting passing year across the league. His mark in that category ranked 20th in the league, and his two passes of 40 or more yards ranked dead last.

That Burress wasn't up to this role shouldn't have come as a surprise if one looks at his historical metrics. In his last full season (2007 with the New York Giants), Burress gained only 7.9 YPA on vertical passes.

To put that YPA total into perspective, consider that it ranked 63rd out of 69 qualifying wide receivers that season. In other words, if Burress wasn't a dominant downfield threat then, why would anyone think he could be one today, at 34 years old, after everything that happened to him since then?

If Manning were in his prime, he might be able to work around some of these weaknesses, but just as was the case with Burress, there are multiple signs that Manning's productivity is declining.

In the 2010 season, Manning posted a 9.7 vertical YPA and a 10.7 stretch vertical YPA (stretch vertical being passes thrown 20 or more yards downfield). Both totals were worse than what Sanchez posted that year, and that was with a Colts receiving corps that was much better than the receiving corps the Jets fielded in 2011. It was also before Manning had two more neck surgeries and Holmes went through an implosion as team captain.

The only way Manning could significantly help the Jets is if New York could assure Manning a dramatic improvement in receiving personnel. It will be quite difficult to achieve this goal via the draft, since the Jets won't be in a position to acquire former Oklahoma State wideout Justin Blackmon. Blackmon is, in the eyes of most scouts, the only wide receiver candidate in the draft who looks to have A.J. Green/Julio Jones impact ability from day one.

That leaves leave free agency as the only option for an upgrade. This year's free agent wide receiver crop looks as if it will include Vincent Jackson, DeSean Jackson and Dwayne Bowe, among others, but since New York already invested big money into Holmes' contract last year and would have to find a way to fit Manning's contract under its salary cap, one has to wonder if breaking the bank for a big name wideout would be feasible for the Jets.

Without that kind of upgrade, it would difficult for even the most talented quarterback in the league to turn this offense into a powerhouse. Since Manning looks to have lost that title, it makes the proposition of his joining the Jets one that simply doesn't guarantee an upgrade.

Where the **** have I been? Did I like completely miss a season of Football? I'm like a little freaked out, its 2012 right, not 13? I wasnt abducted by aliens and missed an entire year of my life? Because apparently I missed the season when the Jets had the 07 Pats passing attack where Sanchez played Brady and BE played Randy Moss.

This is hands down the biggest piece of sh*t I've ever read. And the fact that you were repped for pasting a ******* article is gross.

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Where the **** have I been? Did I like completely miss a season of Football? I'm like a little freaked out, its 2012 right, not 13? I wasnt abducted by aliens and missed an entire year of my life? Because apparently I missed the season when the Jets had the 07 Pats passing attack where Sanchez played Brady and BE played Randy Moss.

This is hands down the biggest piece of sh*t I've ever read. And the fact that you were repped for pasting a ******* article is gross.

What are you mad that someone else thinks the receivers MAYBE played a role in how bad Sanchez was this year? When are you going to figure out that he is not the only one to blame?

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What are you mad that someone else thinks the receivers MAYBE played a role in how bad Sanchez was this year? When are you going to figure out that he is not the only one to blame?

This guys is acting like BE is f'ing Randy Moss. Lets not kid ourselves, he's a very average receiver who can stretch the field but making him out to be this game breaking deep threat is absurd. This is the same guy that let a wide open deep ball bounce of his helmet lmfao and was notorious for the dropsees. If he was so good, why was the passing attack so bad?

Last year it was the 22nd ranked passing attack this year it was 21. It really wasnt any worse than last year. Its just flat out sucks and I think its about 80% QB 10% WR 10% System.

.

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This guys is acting like BE is f'ing Randy Moss. Lets not kid ourselves, he's a very average receiver who can stretch the field but making him out to be this game breaking deep threat is absurd. This is the same guy that let a wide open deep ball bounce of his helmet lmfao and was notorious for the dropsees. If he was so good, why was the passing attack so bad?

Last year it was the 22nd ranked passing attack this year it was 21. It really wasnt any worse than last year. Its just flat out sucks and I think its about 80% QB 10% WR 10% System.

.

He did stretch the field for us though. If he wasnt a game breaking deep threat then why did our deep pass attempts go down? Besides our OL sucking a$$ this year what else changed? Nothing. Same QB and same OC. They didnt have a deep threat to stretch the field and Holmes game suffered because of it too.

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