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Rex Ryan Reaches Out To Steve Young

Quote: INDIANAPOLIS – Hall of Fame quarterback Steve Young said he was surprised when his phone rang last month and it was Jets head coach Rex Ryan calling.

Ryan reached out to Young for clarification on something the ESPN analyst said on the air about Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez struggling to reach his potential under Ryan.

Young said Ryan called and asked him, "What the heck are you talking about?"

"I think it was a great conversation, really open," Young said Saturday. "I hung up and was like, 'I really respect that guy that he would call, that he would listen.' I'm sure he was like, 'maybe Steve Young's crazy,' but at least have the conversation. Him saying to me, 'I'm trying to figure out what's going on in my spot and I heard you.' I thought it was great."

Young, who is part of the four-hour "Sunday NFL Countdown" show on ESPN to preview the Super Bowl on Sunday, said he spoke to Ryan about how offenses struggle under defensive-minded head coaches. Young played for one in George Seifert with the 49ers.

"My fundamental premise is I have watched and experienced defensive-minded head coaches and their effect on offense," Young said. "I watched his dad [former Eagles and Cardinals coach Buddy Ryan], and I talked to him about this, and he admitted he is the same way, 'I'm a defensive coach. I coach great defense. That's what I know.' What happens is the premise is great offense needs light and sunshine. Great defense doesn't. It just doesn't. He brings great sunshine and light to his defense because that's what he knows and that's how he coaches, that's how he practices, that's how he talks. Then what happens is the offense that needs sunshine and light doesn't get it."

Young explained to him that he needs to pay more attention to his offense and his quarterback, in particular. That doesn't mean just sitting in meeting rooms either.

"I think we came to an understanding," Young said. "He said 'I don't feel like I know offense and I don't have the right to go in there.' I said it's not really about that because George Seifert tried to do that. He said you guys were a phenomenal offense with George and I gave him some insight."

The two then talked about some different teams and coaches around the league who have gone through similar transitions.

"We got to talking about [Patriots coach] Bill Belichick," Young said. "Something happened between Cleveland and the first couple of years in Boston. He had the same struggles in Cleveland. Something happened there that allowed him to make that transition."

They also discussed the Ravens, where Ryan was the defensive coordinator for four seasons before coming to the Jets.

"We got talking about Baltimore," Young said. "I think they've suffered and still suffer from strong personalities on their defense who don't mean trouble but they'll say to the offense, 'don't screw it up. If you don't screw this up, we win.' Then you call plays to not screw it up. Then you run plays not to screw it up. Then you play not to screw it up. I think the Jets are in that mold right now where the defense is like, 'don't screw it up.' I think it affects the way people play, the way they practice, the way they call plays. Our conversation was all about that."

Young said this was the first time a head coach has reached out to him about something he has said on the air.

"I thought it was great," Young said. "I was grateful for the chance to talk it out. In TV, I don't even get to say it right. … I was very impressed with his openness to philosophically what I was trying to say."

http://www.nypost.com/p/blogs/jetsbl...#ixzz1lRTiifs4

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Rex Ryan Reaches Out To Steve Young

Quote: INDIANAPOLIS – Hall of Fame quarterback Steve Young said he was surprised when his phone rang last month and it was Jets head coach Rex Ryan calling.

Ryan reached out to Young for clarification on something the ESPN analyst said on the air about Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez struggling to reach his potential under Ryan.

Young said Ryan called and asked him, "What the heck are you talking about?"

"I think it was a great conversation, really open," Young said Saturday. "I hung up and was like, 'I really respect that guy that he would call, that he would listen.' I'm sure he was like, 'maybe Steve Young's crazy,' but at least have the conversation. Him saying to me, 'I'm trying to figure out what's going on in my spot and I heard you.' I thought it was great."

Young, who is part of the four-hour "Sunday NFL Countdown" show on ESPN to preview the Super Bowl on Sunday, said he spoke to Ryan about how offenses struggle under defensive-minded head coaches. Young played for one in George Seifert with the 49ers.

"My fundamental premise is I have watched and experienced defensive-minded head coaches and their effect on offense," Young said. "I watched his dad [former Eagles and Cardinals coach Buddy Ryan], and I talked to him about this, and he admitted he is the same way, 'I'm a defensive coach. I coach great defense. That's what I know.' What happens is the premise is great offense needs light and sunshine. Great defense doesn't. It just doesn't. He brings great sunshine and light to his defense because that's what he knows and that's how he coaches, that's how he practices, that's how he talks. Then what happens is the offense that needs sunshine and light doesn't get it."

Young explained to him that he needs to pay more attention to his offense and his quarterback, in particular. That doesn't mean just sitting in meeting rooms either.

"I think we came to an understanding," Young said. "He said 'I don't feel like I know offense and I don't have the right to go in there.' I said it's not really about that because George Seifert tried to do that. He said you guys were a phenomenal offense with George and I gave him some insight."

The two then talked about some different teams and coaches around the league who have gone through similar transitions.

"We got to talking about [Patriots coach] Bill Belichick," Young said. "Something happened between Cleveland and the first couple of years in Boston. He had the same struggles in Cleveland. Something happened there that allowed him to make that transition."

They also discussed the Ravens, where Ryan was the defensive coordinator for four seasons before coming to the Jets.

"We got talking about Baltimore," Young said. "I think they've suffered and still suffer from strong personalities on their defense who don't mean trouble but they'll say to the offense, 'don't screw it up. If you don't screw this up, we win.' Then you call plays to not screw it up. Then you run plays not to screw it up. Then you play not to screw it up. I think the Jets are in that mold right now where the defense is like, 'don't screw it up.' I think it affects the way people play, the way they practice, the way they call plays. Our conversation was all about that."

Young said this was the first time a head coach has reached out to him about something he has said on the air.

"I thought it was great," Young said. "I was grateful for the chance to talk it out. In TV, I don't even get to say it right. … I was very impressed with his openness to philosophically what I was trying to say."

http://www.nypost.com/p/blogs/jetsbl...#ixzz1lRTiifs4

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Rex Ryan Reaches Out To Steve Young

Quote: INDIANAPOLIS – Hall of Fame quarterback Steve Young said he was surprised when his phone rang last month and it was Jets head coach Rex Ryan calling.

Ryan reached out to Young for clarification on something the ESPN analyst said on the air about Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez struggling to reach his potential under Ryan.

Young said Ryan called and asked him, "What the heck are you talking about?"

"I think it was a great conversation, really open," Young said Saturday. "I hung up and was like, 'I really respect that guy that he would call, that he would listen.' I'm sure he was like, 'maybe Steve Young's crazy,' but at least have the conversation. Him saying to me, 'I'm trying to figure out what's going on in my spot and I heard you.' I thought it was great."

Young, who is part of the four-hour "Sunday NFL Countdown" show on ESPN to preview the Super Bowl on Sunday, said he spoke to Ryan about how offenses struggle under defensive-minded head coaches. Young played for one in George Seifert with the 49ers.

"My fundamental premise is I have watched and experienced defensive-minded head coaches and their effect on offense," Young said. "I watched his dad [former Eagles and Cardinals coach Buddy Ryan], and I talked to him about this, and he admitted he is the same way, 'I'm a defensive coach. I coach great defense. That's what I know.' What happens is the premise is great offense needs light and sunshine. Great defense doesn't. It just doesn't. He brings great sunshine and light to his defense because that's what he knows and that's how he coaches, that's how he practices, that's how he talks. Then what happens is the offense that needs sunshine and light doesn't get it."

Young explained to him that he needs to pay more attention to his offense and his quarterback, in particular. That doesn't mean just sitting in meeting rooms either.

"I think we came to an understanding," Young said. "He said 'I don't feel like I know offense and I don't have the right to go in there.' I said it's not really about that because George Seifert tried to do that. He said you guys were a phenomenal offense with George and I gave him some insight."

The two then talked about some different teams and coaches around the league who have gone through similar transitions.

"We got to talking about [Patriots coach] Bill Belichick," Young said. "Something happened between Cleveland and the first couple of years in Boston. He had the same struggles in Cleveland. Something happened there that allowed him to make that transition."

They also discussed the Ravens, where Ryan was the defensive coordinator for four seasons before coming to the Jets.

"We got talking about Baltimore," Young said. "I think they've suffered and still suffer from strong personalities on their defense who don't mean trouble but they'll say to the offense, 'don't screw it up. If you don't screw this up, we win.' Then you call plays to not screw it up. Then you run plays not to screw it up. Then you play not to screw it up. I think the Jets are in that mold right now where the defense is like, 'don't screw it up.' I think it affects the way people play, the way they practice, the way they call plays. Our conversation was all about that."

Young said this was the first time a head coach has reached out to him about something he has said on the air.

"I thought it was great," Young said. "I was grateful for the chance to talk it out. In TV, I don't even get to say it right. … I was very impressed with his openness to philosophically what I was trying to say."

http://www.nypost.com/p/blogs/jetsbl...#ixzz1lRTiifs4

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Rex Ryan Reaches Out To Steve Young

Quote: INDIANAPOLIS – Hall of Fame quarterback Steve Young said he was surprised when his phone rang last month and it was Jets head coach Rex Ryan calling.

Ryan reached out to Young for clarification on something the ESPN analyst said on the air about Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez struggling to reach his potential under Ryan.

Young said Ryan called and asked him, "What the heck are you talking about?"

"I think it was a great conversation, really open," Young said Saturday. "I hung up and was like, 'I really respect that guy that he would call, that he would listen.' I'm sure he was like, 'maybe Steve Young's crazy,' but at least have the conversation. Him saying to me, 'I'm trying to figure out what's going on in my spot and I heard you.' I thought it was great."

Young, who is part of the four-hour "Sunday NFL Countdown" show on ESPN to preview the Super Bowl on Sunday, said he spoke to Ryan about how offenses struggle under defensive-minded head coaches. Young played for one in George Seifert with the 49ers.

"My fundamental premise is I have watched and experienced defensive-minded head coaches and their effect on offense," Young said. "I watched his dad [former Eagles and Cardinals coach Buddy Ryan], and I talked to him about this, and he admitted he is the same way, 'I'm a defensive coach. I coach great defense. That's what I know.' What happens is the premise is great offense needs light and sunshine. Great defense doesn't. It just doesn't. He brings great sunshine and light to his defense because that's what he knows and that's how he coaches, that's how he practices, that's how he talks. Then what happens is the offense that needs sunshine and light doesn't get it."

Young explained to him that he needs to pay more attention to his offense and his quarterback, in particular. That doesn't mean just sitting in meeting rooms either.

"I think we came to an understanding," Young said. "He said 'I don't feel like I know offense and I don't have the right to go in there.' I said it's not really about that because George Seifert tried to do that. He said you guys were a phenomenal offense with George and I gave him some insight."

The two then talked about some different teams and coaches around the league who have gone through similar transitions.

"We got to talking about [Patriots coach] Bill Belichick," Young said. "Something happened between Cleveland and the first couple of years in Boston. He had the same struggles in Cleveland. Something happened there that allowed him to make that transition."

They also discussed the Ravens, where Ryan was the defensive coordinator for four seasons before coming to the Jets.

"We got talking about Baltimore," Young said. "I think they've suffered and still suffer from strong personalities on their defense who don't mean trouble but they'll say to the offense, 'don't screw it up. If you don't screw this up, we win.' Then you call plays to not screw it up. Then you run plays not to screw it up. Then you play not to screw it up. I think the Jets are in that mold right now where the defense is like, 'don't screw it up.' I think it affects the way people play, the way they practice, the way they call plays. Our conversation was all about that."

Young said this was the first time a head coach has reached out to him about something he has said on the air.

"I thought it was great," Young said. "I was grateful for the chance to talk it out. In TV, I don't even get to say it right. … I was very impressed with his openness to philosophically what I was trying to say."

http://www.nypost.com/p/blogs/jetsbl...#ixzz1lRTiifs4

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"We got to talking about [Patriots coach] Bill Belichick," Young said. "Something happened between Cleveland and the first couple of years in Boston. He had the same struggles in Cleveland. Something happened there that allowed him to make that transition."

Lol, are these two knuckleheads serious? Something unidentifiable happened first few years with NE?

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This is why I love Rex and want him as head coach of the Jets for many years. He wants to win, he lives to win, and he doesn't let his pride get in the way. If he thinks someone can offer him something to help him win he listens. Spin it any way you want but the man is trying to improve his supposed weaknesses, that means he's working to get better.

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This is why I love Rex and want him as head coach of the Jets for many years. He wants to win, he lives to win, and he doesn't let his pride get in the way. If he thinks someone can offer him something to help him win he listens. Spin it any way you want but the man is trying to improve his supposed weaknesses, that means he's working to get better.

^^^^^^^^^^^^

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nice report Kentucky Jet -- all four times...

seriously though, I think Rex's ego took a battering last season (deservedly so) and maybe he's now going to reach out and try and move from great defensive coordinator who lets his offensive coordinator run the offense unsupervised and his special teams coordinator to run the special teams unsupervised

to a real Head Coach that takes charge of ALL three parts of an NFL team and makes sure that he understands what they are doing, why they are doing it and that THEY ARE DOING WHAT HE WANTS THEM TO DO

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This is actually a pretty old story. I cant remember which ESPN show (probably Michael Kay) they asked him abut it as a throwaway at the end of the interview and Young was so thrilled with Rex that he just went on and on and on about it. I guess Rex heard that Young was critical of his handling of the offense and wanted to know why. Specifically he asked him about how he played for Seifert and Young pretty much told him it was tough to play for him because he disliked the offense so much. In some ways it was good for Rex to do, but I also wonder where his head is at if he really takes all that criticism to heart. There are things outsiders see that I think guys on the team are blind to, but Im just not sure about going this far. Still it seemed as if he was open and honest with Young and trying to learn which is a good thing.

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  • 9 months later...

This is why I love Rex and want him as head coach of the Jets for many years. He wants to win, he lives to win, and he doesn't let his pride get in the way. If he thinks someone can offer him something to help him win he listens. Spin it any way you want but the man is trying to improve his supposed weaknesses, that means he's working to get better.

If our 4th year HC really said that he feels he doesn't know offense and doesn't have the right to get involved with it, I quit.

Trying hard to sparse the competing ideas...personally leaning toward he needs to go because he don't get it...otoh...if dipsh*t Woody keeps him...Rex needs to at least get rid of Sparano and hire Norv as the OC.

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That point about Baltimore was awesome...I think Rex is less extreme than the actual players in Baltimore, but the Ravens D has bullied their offense for years. I do not want that to become a thing here.

That's my big add.

Well, it would be nice if their D was really as good as Baltimore's and not just a statistical smokescreen, but yeah, Rex cannot bail. Just taking responsibility without trying to actually effect change on offense is not good enough. He is the head coach.

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