Jump to content

How The Jets Can Get $29 Million Under The 2012 Salary Cap


JetNation

Recommended Posts

Post image for How The Jets Can Get $29 Million Under The 2012 Salary Cap

The Jets can create $29 million in salary cap space for the 2012 season. They will have to maneuver the 2013 salary cap to ensure space for that year given the ramifications of moves made on the 2012 cap.  Most of the numbers come from Jason at NYJETSCAP.com and I want to thank him for helping with his 2012 cap article as well as answering questions.

Here’s how you do it:

The Jets are about $6 million over the cap right now but an $8.4 million 2011 carryover puts them about $2.4 million under the cap.

Mark Sanchez – The Jets can play ‘hard ball’ with him given his 2011 performance.  They can threaten to cut Sanchez saving $9 million in 2012, this gives them some leverage.  Take $5 million in 2012 base pay and push it into the 2013 season.  To get Sanchez to do this the Jets guarantee $2 million of the $5 million in 2013.  The Jets can turn a 2012 $2.75 million roster bonus into a signing bonus, saving about $1.4 million.  Total 2012 savings: $6.4 million.

D’Brickashaw Ferguson – The Jets have less leverage with Ferguson then Sanchez but 2011 was not his finest year.  If Ferguson continues to struggle the Jets can get away from his contract in 2014.  This is how to get some 2012 relief from him.  Ferguson’s 2012/13 contract is guaranteed so take $5 million off his 2012 base salary and raise the 2013 base salary guarantee $1 million.  Then guarantee his 2014 base salary about $6 million, by doing this Ferguson is getting 2014 security in exchange for the $4 million loss.  Total 2012 savings: $5 million.

Antonio Cromartie – Prorate his 2012 $3 million roster bonus to signing bonus saving $2 million in 2012.  The Jets can also ask Cromartie to lower his 2012 base salary $2 million in exchange the Jets guarantee his 2013 base salary of $7 million.  Cromartie gladly gives up $2 million for the $7 million guarantee.  Total 2012 savings: $4 million.

Bart Scott – Convert $3 million of his 2012 guaranteed base salary into signing bonus.  Prorating the money over three years will provide cap relief and Scott won’t care he still gets the money.  Total 2012 savings: $2 million.

Santonio Holmes – Convert $5 million of his 2012 guaranteed base salary into signing bonus.  Same thing as Scott he still gets the money.  Total 2012 savings: $3.75 million.

Calvin Pace – Convert $2 million of his 2012 guaranteed base salary into signing bonus, Pace loses nothing.  Total 2012 savings: $1 million.

Wayne Hunter – Lower his 2012 guaranteed salary $1 million and guarantee $1 million of his 2013 salary.  Total 2012 savings: $1 million.

Eric Smith – Cut and resign for one year at $750,000.  Where is he going?  He’ll take this deal.  Total 2012 savings: $1.3 million.

Mike DeVito – The Jets like DeVito but he carries a $3 million cap charge while having an injury filled 2011.  DeVito could agrees o lower his 2012 salary $1 million if the Jets threaten to cut him, in return the rest of his 2012 salary is guaranteed.  Total 2012 savings: $1 million.

Gerald Alexander – Cut him. Total 2012 savings:  $700,000

Total 2012 savings: $26,150,000 plus $2,400,000 = $28.55 million.

Mike Tannenbaum puts the ‘thumb screws’ to some other players nickel and dimes his way to another $445,000 and there you have it $29 million under the 2012 cap.  Now before you start dancing, there are still some things to contend with.  Bringing back six of the sixteen current former Jets free agents, Robert Turner, Brodney Pool, Jamal Westerman, Aaron Maybin, Martin Tevaseu and Sione Pouha using one year league minimums for all but Pouha, he got $3 million this year and $2.5 million in 2013 with $1.5 million guaranteed, ran the Jets $6.22 million.  The Jets also need money for their 2012 draft class, about $5 million most likely.  So the Jets have about $11.25 million used up that leaves $17.75 million for other 2012 team needs.

The salary cap will most likely go up in 2013 but since we don’t know how much let’s just deal with the 2012 number a $120 million cap.  Assume no 2012 carry over with the moves made pushing salary into 2013 the Jets are over the cap so they’ll have to make some cuts.  The Jets cut Bart Scott saving $5.15 million, Calvin Pace saving $7.6 million, Wayne Hunter saving $3 million.  Total savings: $15.75 million. 

With these cuts the Jets 2013 cap stands at $105.5 million but you only have 26 players on your roster.  Players not accounted for in the $105.5 million number are 2012 rookies who are on the 2013 roster and any free agents who signed a multi-year deal in 2012.  The Jets also have to try and resign their own free agents like Dustin Keller, Mike DeVito and Matt Slauson.  The Jets will also need money for their 2013 draft class.

So even if the cap rises the Jets have to make similar moves like they did in 2012.  David Harris might be a place they look, $13 million cap value in 2013, maybe Cromartie or Ferguson again or maybe they cut Pouha saving $1.75 million.  The Jets take away salary and spread it out as signing bonus and/or get some give back for future guaranteed monies in 2014, just like the 2012 plan, but there are consequences.

When a team takes salary one year but guarantees the next year’s salary the team is stuck with that player’s next year’s salary.  The Jets did this with Scott/Pace and are now dealing with their high salaries and declining play with no way out.  What if the player gets injured during the year and can’t play the next, the team is stuck with the cap charge paying for a non-player.  When you turn salary or roster bonuses into signing bonuses the cost gets spread out over the life of the contract but if you cut/trade the player all that money goes on that year’s cap, making it hard to cut/trade that player.

If the Jets ‘go for broke’ in 2012 and make as much cap space as possible they will limit their roster flexibility severely in following years.  Pushing money forward will trap the Jets with certain player’s contracts, just like with Holmes after last year.   If those players can’t or don’t live up to their contracts, the Jets will be in a tough spot because they may be forced to cut a player they don’t want to just to get under a future cap.  For example, if the Jets needed 2012 cap relief immediately the cuts would likely be Dustin Keller or Brandon Moore.   Both players bring $3 million in cap savings each but who would replace them if the Jets were forced to make such a move?

So the questions are: 

  • Do you make the cap space available to sign players you want and worry about it later? 
  • Be frugal, use drafted/undrafted players to push out higher priced ones and spend more when the time is right? 

di
di

_HWsDlP5_ss

View the full article
Link to comment
Share on other sites

it's an interesting article. I don't think they have any leverage with DBrick, considering he just made the Pro Bowl as a starter. his reputation around the league is elite, whether Jets fans want to admit that or not. He's among the top LT in the AFC. Sanchez restructure is a possibility and I hope they do it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well that's awesome...Agreed with Bit that there's no real leverage with D'Brick (though reading around message boards it seems like he's underrated as heck - F you Thomas and Long)...I really hope they can pull most of this off for Peyton or Mario or Calais or Nicks or somethin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another way to get savings from D'Brick is by converting guaranteed money into signing bonus. That would spread the money out but D'Brick would lose nothing. The Jets will get 2012 cap relief from him one way or another it depends upon what D’Brick thinks is best.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

it's an interesting article. I don't think they have any leverage with DBrick, considering he just made the Pro Bowl as a starter. his reputation around the league is elite, whether Jets fans want to admit that or not. He's among the top LT in the AFC. Sanchez restructure is a possibility and I hope they do it.

I agree with you. What is your opinion of Gerald Alexander? Some guys are fairly high on his ability. Tracy Wilson as well. What say you?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Leave the cap alone this year. Don’t push any money into 13 or 14. Let the deadwood contracts play out.

Unload the deadwood next year. Jets will be good to go in 13 and 14. Jets still have enough young talent on the team to be at least competitive in 12.

Reload on the run.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So let me clarify this, by converting a lot of the players money into what is called a "signing bonus" you push money into the next year, but that money is guaranteed, so that this current year you can have cap room.

Am i understanding this correctly?

Not exactly, let’s say you take $5 million in guaranteed salary in 2012 and convert it into signing bonus, the money is still guaranteed to the player. He gets his $5 million, no player is going to give up guaranteed money for nothing. That is why players want guaranteed money it protects them.

What happens is the now $5 million in converted signing bonus is spread over the life of that players contract. So if the player has a 5 year contract $1million is added to each year so $5 million off of 2012 salary but $1million added to 2012, 13, 14 15 ,16 caps. Thus you end up with a $4 million savings for the 2012 season. The problem is if you cut the player all that money accelerates to the current cap, makes it harder to cut a player.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Seems like you are looking to guarantee a bunch of 2013 money. I'm not a fan of that at all. Didn't they just exercise the option on Wayne Hunter? If they were going to save any money there they'd have cut him and resigned at a lower number the way they did with Brandon Moore a few years ago.

Yeah - what am I missing about Hunter? I thought we were all pissed cause they just gave him a new deal?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not exactly, let’s say you take $5 million in guaranteed salary in 2012 and convert it into signing bonus, the money is still guaranteed to the player. He gets his $5 million, no player is going to give up guaranteed money for nothing. That is why players want guaranteed money it protects them.

What happens is the now $5 million in converted signing bonus is spread over the life of that players contract. So if the player has a 5 year contract $1million is added to each year so $5 million off of 2012 salary but $1million added to 2012, 13, 14 15 ,16 caps. Thus you end up with a $4 million savings for the 2012 season. The problem is if you cut the player all that money accelerates to the current cap, makes it harder to cut a player.

So if you converted it to a signing bonus and it was, under your scenario, spread over five years, 1 mil each year, say you cut him in year 2, so under year 2's cap you would have a 4 million charge

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Leave the cap alone this year. Don’t push any money into 13 or 14. Let the deadwood contracts play out.

Unload the deadwood next year. Jets will be good to go in 13 and 14. Jets still have enough young talent on the team to be at least competitive in 12.

Reload on the run.

There is no way the Jets can just leave the 2012 cap alone. They are going to have to save money someway. I only see maybe 5 or 6 million in actual salary reductions for 2012 without adding money to future caps. Adding that to the 2.4 mil in cap room, we'll be generous and say $10 million under the cap without pushing any monies into future caps. You need $5 million for the draft now you have only $5 million to sign the some of the 16 former Jets free agents, not enough. The Jets cap space in 2013 and 14 can take on some money to help this year without much future pain. The question is how far will they or should they go?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agree the Jets have no leverage with Brick. The guy may have had his worst season since his rookie year, but he's a damn good player who I think showed something that we kind of already knew, he needs the offseason program far more than your average NFL player. For whatever reason, the guy is just incapable of keeping weight on by himself. I think he'll be fine next year and if there's any reason they get any relief from him, it will be because he willingly helps the team out, and not any leverage.

There's no way they're going to convert that much money into hitting future caps, but there's definitely room to work. Some of those moves could definitely work, and guys like Scott and Smith (who should just be flat out cut, no re-signing) are the obvious places the team is likely to start.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So if you converted it to a signing bonus and it was, under your scenario, spread over five years, 1 mil each year, say you cut him in year 2, so under year 2's cap you would have a 4 million charge

I think you have it but this might help as well. Using the earlier scenario, $5 million over 5 years the contract is 2012-16. [This is the way all signing bonuses work, so when you hear about player X getting a 5 year deal with a $20 million signing bonus for cap purposes the signing bonus is prorated so it will count $4 million per year under each year’s cap for the life of that contract.]

Getting back, the Jets take $5 million and convert into signing bonus, lowering the 2012 cap by $4 million. So now $1 million added to 2012,13, 14, 15, 16 cap, there is your $5 million, $1 million per year over 5 years.

The player plays the 2012 &13 seasons, assuming no other guaranteed money, the Jets want to cut this player before 2014 season. If the player is cut the Jets will get hit with a $3 million cap charge in 2014. The $1 million prorated signing bonus money in years 2014, 15 & 16 now accelerates totally on to the 2014 cap.

If the Jets cut this player before the 2015 season the charge is $2 million on the 2015 cap, $1million for 2015 & $1 million for 2016 accelerates on to the 2015 cap. So the longer the player plays under the contract the less signing bonus money accelerates because it was included in past caps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agree the Jets have no leverage with Brick. The guy may have had his worst season since his rookie year, but he's a damn good player who I think showed something that we kind of already knew, he needs the offseason program far more than your average NFL player. For whatever reason, the guy is just incapable of keeping weight on by himself. I think he'll be fine next year and if there's any reason they get any relief from him, it will be because he willingly helps the team out, and not any leverage.

There's no way they're going to convert that much money into hitting future caps, but there's definitely room to work. Some of those moves could definitely work, and guys like Scott and Smith (who should just be flat out cut, no re-signing) are the obvious places the team is likely to start.

Another way to get savings from D'Brick is by converting guaranteed money into signing bonus. That would spread the money out but D'Brick would lose nothing. The Jets will get 2012 cap relief from him one way or another it depends upon what D’Brick thinks is best.

I’ll show you how to save cap space on D'Brickashaw Ferguson contract without him losing a dime. Ferguson’s contract runs through 2017.

Ferguson’s 2012 guaranteed base salary about $10 million. Lower his base salary to $ 1 million then convert the rest $9 million into signing bonus. You save $7.5 million on the 2012 cap and Ferguson still gets the money. $1.5 million is added to 2012, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 caps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Using the earlier scenario, $5 million over 5 years the contract is 2012-16. [This is the way all signing bonuses work, so when you hear about player X getting a 5 year deal with a $20 million signing bonus for cap purposes the signing bonus is prorated so it will count $4 million per year under each year’s cap for the life of that contract.]

Getting back, the Jets take $5 million and convert into signing bonus, lowering the 2012 cap by $4 million. So now $1 million added to 2012,13, 14, 15, 16 cap, there is your $5 million, $1 million per year over 5 years.

The player plays the 2012 &13 seasons, assuming no other guaranteed money, the Jets want to cut this player before 2014 season. If the player is cut the Jets will get hit with a $3 million cap charge in 2014. The $1 million prorated signing bonus money in years 2014, 15 & 16 now accelerates totally on to the 2014 cap.

If the Jets cut this player before the 2015 season the charge is $2 million on the 2015 cap, $1million for 2015 & $1 million for 2016 accelerates on to the 2015 cap. So the longer the player plays under the contract the less signing bonus money accelerates because it was included in past caps.

That makes sense. Thanks.

The only other thing is, is there a limit to how much base salary you can convert? I'm curious how some of the numbers were formulated in the original post.

Like Sancez for example has a base salary of roughly $8.5 million, so I was wondering how they came up with converting $5 million.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That makes sense. Thanks.

The only other thing is, is there a limit to how much base salary you can convert? I'm curious how some of the numbers were formulated in the original post.

Like Sancez for example has a base salary of roughly $8.5 million, so I was wondering how they came up with converting $5 million.

The base salary has to be at least the league minimum salary requirements, link below.

http://www.steelersd...-base-salaries/

In Sanchez's case his base salary is not guaranteed. So if the Jets cut him they save $9 million on the 2012 cap. The Jets might use this as leverage to get Sanchez to give money back. For the article I wanted to get $5 million in 2012 salary back, that's a lot, so I guaranteed $2 million for him in 2013, he will probably only give up $3 million.

Here's an extreme example using D' Brick, notice I don't take all his salary.

Ferguson’s 2012 guaranteed base salary about $10 million. Lower his base salary to $ 1 million then convert the rest $9 million into signing bonus. You save $7.5 million on the 2012 cap and Ferguson still gets the money. $1.5 million is added to 2012, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 caps.

Ferguson’s 2013 guaranteed base salary about $7 million. Lower his base salary $6 million and convert it into signing bonus. You save $4.8 million on the 2013 cap. $1.2 million added to 2013, 14, 15, 16, 17 caps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

it's an interesting article. I don't think they have any leverage with DBrick, considering he just made the Pro Bowl as a starter. his reputation around the league is elite, whether Jets fans want to admit that or not. He's among the top LT in the AFC. Sanchez restructure is a possibility and I hope they do it.

Agreed.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is no way the Jets can just leave the 2012 cap alone. They are going to have to save money someway. I only see maybe 5 or 6 million in actual salary reductions for 2012 without adding money to future caps. Adding that to the 2.4 mil in cap room, we'll be generous and say $10 million under the cap without pushing any monies into future caps. You need $5 million for the draft now you have only $5 million to sign the some of the 16 former Jets free agents, not enough. The Jets cap space in 2013 and 14 can take on some money to help this year without much future pain. The question is how far will they or should they go?

The future pain will be they will be bound to deadwood in 13 and 14 like Scott and Pace. Both their production was way down. It will only get worst. Why pay guys $8,000,000 who aren't going to produce.

This is the year to clear all the dead money, not to create more down the road. Of course they have to clear enough money to field a team, but they just don't have the fire power, or money, to make a serious Super Bowl run in 2012 unless they get extremely lucky

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agree the Jets have no leverage with Brick. The guy may have had his worst season since his rookie year, but he's a damn good player who I think showed something that we kind of already knew, he needs the offseason program far more than your average NFL player. For whatever reason, the guy is just incapable of keeping weight on by himself. I think he'll be fine next year and if there's any reason they get any relief from him, it will be because he willingly helps the team out, and not any leverage.

There's no way they're going to convert that much money into hitting future caps, but there's definitely room to work. Some of those moves could definitely work, and guys like Scott and Smith (who should just be flat out cut, no re-signing) are the obvious places the team is likely to start.

Except they lose cap cutting Scott and cutting Smith to resign him at $750 only saves a little over $1m. All in all you'd save basically nothing with those moves.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If Ferguson play’s out his 2012 and 2013 contract he will be vulnerable to some pressure from the Jets in 2014. The team will have some leverage over his contract then. Ferguson might want the 2014 guarantee to protect himself now from 2014 in case the Jets try and squeeze him. You never know what will happen with a player injuries and the like so sometimes the player will grab the future guarantee even if it means giving up something now.

I also didn't want to prorate money, it can be done, but want to avoid it. I’d rather use the scenario in the article, it protects the team more and leads to actual salary reduction, but if Ferguson says no the converting salary into signing bonus will work. I'm already pushing so much money forward, have to try and save somewhere?

Here's cap saving's using Ferguson's contract that does not change the money he gets:

Ferguson’s 2012 guaranteed base salary about $10 million. Lower his base salary to $ 1 million then convert the rest $9 million into signing bonus. You save $7.5 million on the 2012 cap and Ferguson still gets the money. $1.5 million is added to 2012, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 caps.

Ferguson’s 2013 guaranteed base salary about $7 million. Lower his base salary $6 million and convert it into signing bonus. You save $4.8 million on the 2013 cap. $1.2 million added to 2013, 14, 15, 16, 17 caps.

You got cap savings in 2012 and 2013 but you are stuck with D’Brick for the remainder of his contract. Hope he doesn’t get hurt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The future pain will be they will be bound to deadwood in 13 and 14 like Scott and Pace. Both their production was way down. It will only get worst. Why pay guys $8,000,000 who aren't going to produce.

This is the year to clear all the dead money, not to create more down the road. Of course they have to clear enough money to field a team, but they just don't have the fire power, or money, to make a serious Super Bowl run in 2012 unless they get extremely lucky

There is no way the Jets can just leave the 2012 cap alone. They are going to have to save money someway. I only see maybe 5 or 6 million in actual salary reductions for 2012 without adding money to future caps. Adding that to the 2.4 mil in cap room, we'll be generous and say $10 million under the cap without pushing any monies into future caps. You need $5 million for the draft now you have only $5 million to sign the some of the 16 former Jets free agents, not enough. The Jets cap space in 2013 and 14 can take on some money to help this year without much future pain. The question is how far will they or should they go?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Except they lose cap cutting Scott and cutting Smith to resign him at $750 only saves a little over $1m. All in all you'd save basically nothing with those moves.

Well like I said, you don't re-sign Smith. There is literally no reason whatsoever to do so. He's absolutely ******* awful. You can find an UDFA who sucks less. Scott would be more a matter of renegotiation than cutting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well like I said, you don't re-sign Smith. There is literally no reason whatsoever to do so. He's absolutely ******* awful. You can find an UDFA who sucks less. Scott would be more a matter of renegotiation than cutting.

You cannot save anything by renegotiating with Scott. His 2012 salary is guaranteed and he's not giving up any of it. If you cut Scott and his picked up by another team, the amount he gets paid by said team will come off the 2012 Jets cap. This is a highly unlikely scenario since Scott won't get much elsewhere. The only other way to get 2012 cap relief from Scott is how it is done in the article.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you cut someone - like Gerald Alexander in this example - you don't save their whole salary off the cap. Not really, unless you can get the league to only count the team's top 50 salaries instead of the top 51 salaries. You cut anyone, then salary #52 becomes salary #51. League minimum, even for an undrafted rookie, is $390K.

$ -710K = Cut Alexander

$+390K = Prev salary #52 now counts towards cap

------------------------------

$ 320K net savings, not $700K

Is Alexander worth $320K worth of cap space more than an undrafted rookie? That is the decision.

Actually the savings might not even be that much. An undrafted rookie is the most likely to get cut or replaced during the season. So that $390K is guaranteed by being on the opening day roster, then he gets replaced for however many weeks by someone else during the season. In the end, the net savings is probably maybe a quarter million dollars.

So when making these wish lists (and I've made my share over the years), you have to consider more than "Subtract salary from column B. Subtract more salry from Column B. Subtract still more from column B. Use those combined numbers to add a star player add to column A...." You always need to count the top 51.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you cut someone - like Gerald Alexander in this example - you don't save their whole salary off the cap. Not really, unless you can get the league to only count the team's top 50 salaries instead of the top 51 salaries. You cut anyone, then salary #52 becomes salary #51. League minimum, even for an undrafted rookie, is $390K.

$ -710K = Cut Alexander

$+390K = Prev salary #52 now counts towards cap

------------------------------

$ 320K net savings, not $700K

Is Alexander worth $320K worth of cap space more than an undrafted rookie? That is the decision.

Actually the savings might not even be that much. An undrafted rookie is the most likely to get cut or replaced during the season. So that $390K is guaranteed by being on the opening day roster, then he gets replaced for however many weeks by someone else during the season. In the end, the net savings is probably maybe a quarter million dollars.

So when making these wish lists (and I've made my share over the years), you have to consider more than "Subtract salary from column B. Subtract more salry from Column B. Subtract still more from column B. Use those combined numbers to add a star player add to column A...." You always need to count the top 51.

You are correct. I put in about $450,000 in mystery cuts, guess we could add $390K to them. I had to stop the article somewhere. The point of the article is to show just how hard it's going to be to sign all these big time free agents everyone wants and isn't that how the team got to where they are?

Basically there are only certain ways to lower a team’s salary cap number:

1. Cut the player and take whatever money comes off the cap.

2. Renegotiate the player’s contract to a lower salary.

3. Renegotiate a contract to push non-guarantee base salary back. This usually means the player will not see it.

4. Convert money into signing bonus spreading it out over the life of the contract.

Problem: Which Jets player’s are doing 1, 2 or 3 and how much?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you cut someone - like Gerald Alexander in this example - you don't save their whole salary off the cap. Not really, unless you can get the league to only count the team's top 50 salaries instead of the top 51 salaries. You cut anyone, then salary #52 becomes salary #51. League minimum, even for an undrafted rookie, is $390K.

$ -710K = Cut Alexander

$+390K = Prev salary #52 now counts towards cap

------------------------------

$ 320K net savings, not $700K

Is Alexander worth $320K worth of cap space more than an undrafted rookie? That is the decision.

Actually the savings might not even be that much. An undrafted rookie is the most likely to get cut or replaced during the season. So that $390K is guaranteed by being on the opening day roster, then he gets replaced for however many weeks by someone else during the season. In the end, the net savings is probably maybe a quarter million dollars.

So when making these wish lists (and I've made my share over the years), you have to consider more than "Subtract salary from column B. Subtract more salry from Column B. Subtract still more from column B. Use those combined numbers to add a star player add to column A...." You always need to count the top 51.

Yeah I was thinking along the lines of what your saying. The article is cool and all but you still have to fill the roster. So if the league minimum is say $450 you're really only saving about $250 by cutting Alexander.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are correct. I put in about $450,000 in mystery cuts, guess we could add it to them. I had to stop the article somewhere. The point of the article is to show just how hard it's going to be to sign all these big time free agents everyone wants and isn't that how the team got to where they are?

Basically there are only certain ways to lower a team’s salary cap number:

1. Cut the player and take whatever money comes off the cap.

2. Renegotiate the player’s contract to a lower salary.

3. Renegotiate a contract to push non-guarantee base salary back. This usually means the player will not see it.

4. Convert money into signing bonus spreading it out over the life of the contract.

Problem: Which Jets player’s are doing 1, 2 or 3 and how much?

I get it. But the team already signed its big name big contract players: Revis, Ferguson, Sanchez, Mangold, Holmes, Cromartie, Pace, Harris, Scott.

No matter what name technically exists on paper, right now the Jets have no starting safeties, no starting RT, and only 1 starting OLB. Could use another WR to take Burress's place also. Ideally, 2 of those positions can be filled with rookies. I suppose I can also still dream that Ducasse suddenly learns how to play at the pro level.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I get it. But the team already signed its big name big contract players: Revis, Ferguson, Sanchez, Mangold, Holmes, Cromartie, Pace, Harris, Scott.

No matter what name technically exists on paper, right now the Jets have no starting safeties, no starting RT, and only 1 starting OLB. Could use another WR to take Burress's place also. Ideally, 2 of those positions can be filled with rookies. I suppose I can also still dream that Ducasse suddenly learns how to play at the pro level.

My Mistake on Alexnder I thought the FA signings I talk about in the article would push the number down but forgot to up the next in line. It's small potatoes, my bad. I just don't know how the team is going to fill all these holes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

it's an interesting article. I don't think they have any leverage with DBrick, considering he just made the Pro Bowl as a starter. his reputation around the league is elite, whether Jets fans want to admit that or not. He's among the top LT in the AFC. Sanchez restructure is a possibility and I hope they do it.

I dont think the reputation is elite but thats not the point. The leverage the Jets have with Brick is that he signed a deal with mnimal backend protection. If he has another bad year hed be toast in 2013. Its actually in his best interests to rework his deal now and rearrange the money to guarantee a roster spot in 2014 and 2015.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...