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Purchasing a new gas grill


Integrity28
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I'm about to become a homeowner, and on the short-list of immediate purchases is a gas grill. Things I'm considering include a Weber kettle, and a smoker, but with as busy as we are these days and a baby coming, I'm thinking a gas grill might be the way to go... so while I appreciate that point-of-view of the BBQ purists that insist on charcoal or wood, I'm pretty firm in wanting gas... and that's where I'd like to get some advice.

 

What features are must-haves?

 

What manufacturers and models would you recommend?

 

Thanks.

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Should you wish to venture "across the pond", there was a recent thread in the off topic forum. 

 

That said, I'll reiterate my preference.  If you have the money (depending on the model, around a grand), go with the gold standard of gas grills, the Weber Genesis with a side burner.  You can pick various colors, but they have an awesome Jet green, black, and--for a little more money--stainless steel.  With a cover (I won't talk to you if you opt not to cover your grill), you'll have this unit for at least 10 years.

 

 

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I don't like Weber's "economy" model, the Spirit.  For the money, I think it's cheaply made.  I cannot figure Weber's thinking process by making the handle in plastic.  You folks are making money hand over fist, control the market.  Don't cheap out like that.
 
If you want to spend less, most of the grills suck.  The two best I have seen in the lower price range are Huntington and DynaGlo.  Both are well made, dependable units with great features.
 
 
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I'm about to become a homeowner, and on the short-list of immediate purchases is a gas grill. Things I'm considering include a Weber kettle, and a smoker, but with as busy as we are these days and a baby coming, I'm thinking a gas grill might be the way to go... so while I appreciate that point-of-view of the BBQ purists that insist on charcoal or wood, I'm pretty firm in wanting gas... and that's where I'd like to get some advice.

 

What features are must-haves?

 

What manufacturers and models would you recommend?

 

Thanks.

 

 

Get a Weber gas grill that has a drawer to add some wood chips.  Descent compromise. 

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Get a Weber gas grill that has a drawer to add some wood chips.  Descent compromise. 

Good idea.

 

For folks that don't have this option, and don't want to buy a ready made wood chip box, wrap some soaked wood chips in heavy duty aluminum foil.  Then punch a few holes on it and place on the grill to heat and smoke.  When you're done, just chuck it out.    Cheap and easy.

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Good idea.

 

For folks that don't have this option, and don't want to buy a ready made wood chip box, wrap some soaked wood chips in heavy duty aluminum foil.  Then punch a few holes on it and place on the grill to heat and smoke.  When you're done, just chuck it out.    Cheap and easy.

 

 

That works just as well. 

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Hire a lawn service.  Then, go out and buy a few cases of wine and/or beer to enjoy during the times you would be busting your ass mowing, leaf blowing, etc.

 

I'm actually looking forward to having a home to take care of. I've been renting since college. It's teh suck. Come home and plop on the couch, or go out and waste money to feel like you "got out". 

 

I want to be able to come home, and have some sort of something to roll up my sleeves and dig into. Then, kick my feet up and take pride in it. It's just how I'm wired. I went to Maine this past weekend and built a 60 foot dock with my Dad, to relax. 

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I'm actually looking forward to having a home to take care of. I've been renting since college. It's teh suck. Come home and plop on the couch, or go out and waste money to feel like you "got out". 

 

I want to be able to come home, and have some sort of something to roll up my sleeves and dig into. Then, kick my feet up and take pride in it. It's just how I'm wired. I went to Maine this past weekend and built a 60 foot dock with my Dad, to relax. 

Wow.  He sounds like my late uncle.  Growing up, all we did were projects on his house.  I still cannot look at a post hole digger (manual, back breaking  one, of course) without getting annoyed.

 

Congratulations on the house.  Best of luck.

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Wow.  He sounds like my late uncle.  Growing up, all we did were projects on his house.  I still cannot look at a post hole digger (manual, back breaking  one, of course) without getting annoyed.

 

Congratulations on the house.  Best of luck.

 

Thanks.

 

We've been vacationing in Maine for 25+ years, about 15 years ago my parents bought a small house in a cove a short ways from where we grew up renting cabins. My father and I have replaced the dock twice now, put in all new doors, installed new appliances in the kitchen, built a deck off the front and back, removed a ton of trees, sided it, updated the bathroom, etc, etc.

 

I didn't know much about any of this, he's taught me all along the way. (He was a carpenter before I was born, when I came along he got a job at the power plant to afford the house I grew up in.) Pretty sure as soon as he retires, he'll go right back to carpentry and home improvement. Cool thing for me is if he moves up here by me, I can do it with him on the side, and now I've got a home of my own that I'll be able to put sweat equity into over the years to come.

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Thanks.

 

We've been vacationing in Maine for 25+ years, about 15 years ago my parents bought a small house in a cove a short ways from where we grew up renting cabins. My father and I have replaced the dock twice now, put in all new doors, installed new appliances in the kitchen, built a deck off the front and back, removed a ton of trees, sided it, updated the bathroom, etc, etc.

 

I didn't know much about any of this, he's taught me all along the way. (He was a carpenter before I was born, when I came along he got a job at the power plant to afford the house I grew up in.) Pretty sure as soon as he retires, he'll go right back to carpentry and home improvement. Cool thing for me is if he moves up here by me, I can do it with him on the side, and now I've got a home of my own that I'll be able to put sweat equity into over the years to come.

Your Dad sounds like an ace.  Now that you're a homeowner, nothing better than having someone like him who is a tradesman.  Plus, he taught you so much that guys like me need to pay a contractor to do.

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Thanks.

 

We've been vacationing in Maine for 25+ years, about 15 years ago my parents bought a small house in a cove a short ways from where we grew up renting cabins. My father and I have replaced the dock twice now, put in all new doors, installed new appliances in the kitchen, built a deck off the front and back, removed a ton of trees, sided it, updated the bathroom, etc, etc.

 

I didn't know much about any of this, he's taught me all along the way. (He was a carpenter before I was born, when I came along he got a job at the power plant to afford the house I grew up in.) Pretty sure as soon as he retires, he'll go right back to carpentry and home improvement. Cool thing for me is if he moves up here by me, I can do it with him on the side, and now I've got a home of my own that I'll be able to put sweat equity into over the years to come.

 

 

Sounds great.  I thought that way too.  I am renting now and I breathe easy every day.  Just helping with my Dad's place and the Long Island house (it is basically a beach house, but it takes 20 minutes to drive to the beach) beats the hell out of me. 

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I'm actually looking forward to having a home to take care of. I've been renting since college. It's teh suck. Come home and plop on the couch, or go out and waste money to feel like you "got out". 

 

I want to be able to come home, and have some sort of something to roll up my sleeves and dig into. Then, kick my feet up and take pride in it. It's just how I'm wired. I went to Maine this past weekend and built a 60 foot dock with my Dad, to relax. 

 

And you will soon learn you do not own the home, the home owns you.

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Gas grills are for women, children, and the elderly. 

I fit the bill. 

 

I like cooking with charcoal, too.  Sometimes, especially when you're cooking for a family on a weeknight, having a gas grill allows you to get a meal done quick.  It also makes cooking for one or two people more economical.

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Good stuff guys.

 

Any advice on lawnmowers? LOL

 

 

How big is the lawn?  Riding mowers are nice if you have a lot of open space and an acre+ to mow.  For riding I say spend a little more get a Cub Cadet.  Bought one in 1997 and the things still works like a champ.  If you gonna push the lawn you gotta decide if you want electric or gas.  If you have sod then a nice electric mower for a small lawn is pretty nice.  If you have natural grass full of weeds and stuff that may get high and have to be mulched then go with gas.  Self mulching gas mowers are nice.

 

// pac'd

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How big is the lawn?  Riding mowers are nice if you have a lot of open space and an acre+ to mow.  For riding I say spend a little more get a Cub Cadet.  Bought one in 1997 and the things still works like a champ.  If you gonna push the lawn you gotta decide if you want electric or gas.  If you have sod then a nice electric mower for a small lawn is pretty nice.  If you have natural grass full of weeds and stuff that may get high and have to be mulched then go with gas.  Self mulching gas mowers are nice.

 

// pac'd

 

Just shy of a half acre. 

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Could go with small sit down or a big self propelled mulching mower.

That's what I'm thinking. With a baby on the way, and getting paid very well for freelance these days, my time is worth too much to skimp and just get a 22" mower that'll inevitably cost me half my Saturdays.

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That's what I'm thinking. With a baby on the way, and getting paid very well for freelance these days, my time is worth too much to skimp and just get a 22" mower that'll inevitably cost me half my Saturdays.

 

Are you a cripple?

 

As Crusher said, if you have an open lawn, the riding is probably the best way to go. 

 

If you have a lot of obstacles, then a self propelled lawn mower might be a better idea.  I have to deal with a concrete driveway (a Southern thing) that sits anywhere from an inch below to three inches above the ground.  There is a tree, a shed, a fence, etc. 

 

Either way, you will need a weed wacker to hit the areas your mower cannot.

 

As Boro said, if you are being paid very well, hire a company to do it.  They will do a far better job than you can and this will allow you more time to concentrate in the house.

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My yard is  0.4 acres.  We moved here from the country so I already have a cheap Craftsman Rider.  

My former house was 1.3acres with a chainlink fence.  mow+weedwack was 3hrs.

 

Now I can mow+weedwack in 50min.

 

Thoughts:

Landscape with mowing in mind.  Plan properly to minimize the   $##%#  weedwacking.

*EVERYTHING gets a bead of mulch around it that you can mow up to. (no weedwacking!)   

*Mulch should meet the house and sidewalk at gentle angles the mower can ride along without missing a spot. 

*Chainlink fences are for suckers. You spend forever weedwacking around them, and they eat your weed whip string.  Some people put roundup under the fence and have an ugly dirt stripe underneath with weeds growing.  Not a better option.  If you need a fence, get a WOOD fence you can trim directly up to.

 

Also, buy some beer. You can drink it with the free time you have because you planned ahead (above) to minimize the maintenance effort.

 

What mower to buy?  Up to you.

My brother has a $3,000 zero-turn fancy-shmancy mower.  I have a $900 Craftsman.  The grass doesn't care, and his breaks more than mine does.  Yes, his neighbors think he's cool, but adoration of his neighbors hasn't improved his life measurably, so I think my choice is the better one.

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My yard is  0.4 acres.  We moved here from the country so I already have a cheap Craftsman Rider.  

My former house was 1.3acres with a chainlink fence.  mow+weedwack was 3hrs.

 

Now I can mow+weedwack in 50min.

 

Thoughts:

Landscape with mowing in mind.  Plan properly to minimize the   $##%#  weedwacking.

*EVERYTHING gets a bead of mulch around it that you can mow up to. (no weedwacking!)   

*Mulch should meet the house and sidewalk at gentle angles the mower can ride along without missing a spot. 

*Chainlink fences are for suckers. You spend forever weedwacking around them, and they eat your weed whip string.  Some people put roundup under the fence and have an ugly dirt stripe underneath with weeds growing.  Not a better option.  If you need a fence, get a WOOD fence you can trim directly up to.

 

Also, buy some beer. You can drink it with the free time you have because you planned ahead (above) to minimize the maintenance effort.

 

What mower to buy?  Up to you.

My brother has a $3,000 zero-turn fancy-shmancy mower.  I have a $900 Craftsman.  The grass doesn't care, and his breaks more than mine does.  Yes, his neighbors think he's cool, but adoration of his neighbors hasn't improved his life measurably, so I think my choice is the better one.

 

Good stuff, thanks.

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My yard is  0.4 acres.  We moved here from the country so I already have a cheap Craftsman Rider.  

My former house was 1.3acres with a chainlink fence.  mow+weedwack was 3hrs.

 

Now I can mow+weedwack in 50min.

 

Thoughts:

Landscape with mowing in mind.  Plan properly to minimize the   $##%#  weedwacking.

*EVERYTHING gets a bead of mulch around it that you can mow up to. (no weedwacking!)   

*Mulch should meet the house and sidewalk at gentle angles the mower can ride along without missing a spot. 

*Chainlink fences are for suckers. You spend forever weedwacking around them, and they eat your weed whip string.  Some people put roundup under the fence and have an ugly dirt stripe underneath with weeds growing.  Not a better option.  If you need a fence, get a WOOD fence you can trim directly up to.

 

Also, buy some beer. You can drink it with the free time you have because you planned ahead (above) to minimize the maintenance effort.

 

What mower to buy?  Up to you.

My brother has a $3,000 zero-turn fancy-shmancy mower.  I have a $900 Craftsman.  The grass doesn't care, and his breaks more than mine does.  Yes, his neighbors think he's cool, but adoration of his neighbors hasn't improved his life measurably, so I think my choice is the better one.

Pac please do not log again on Jerry's account again. Jerry is one of my favorite posters and I would be very upset if he left the site. Tnaks Crusher.
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hire PAC to mow.. seriously , I have 1.3 acres and pay 35 a week.. my mower cost me over a grand which is a season and a half of mows... it's such a waste of time... time is your most valuable resource, paying someone 15 an hour to mow frees you up to do more high level projects or just spend time with family.. think opportunity cost.. outsource that sh*t

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hire PAC to mow.. seriously , I have 1.3 acres and pay 35 a week.. my mower cost me over a grand which is a season and a half of mows... it's such a waste of time... time is your most valuable resource, paying someone 15 an hour to mow frees you up to do more high level projects or just spend time with family.. think opportunity cost.. outsource that sh*t

I have two boys who live eat and crap in my house. I will start starving bitches if my lawn ain't cut.
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I bought a five burner Uni-Flame grill with side burner at Lowe's a few years ago and have always been happy with it. Enough room to cook for a party, but enough versatility to cook for just the wife and me. Didn't think I'd get much use out of the side burner, but I have.

 

My yard is a bit over an acre on a hillside. Picked up a Yard Machines tractor (MTD, brand, same family as Cub Cadet) as an end of season bargain almost six years ago. 42 inch cut, always works great. I've replaced the battery and a pulley on the mower deck, but that's it.

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