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Jets practicing the Pistol


Cmartin
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July 31st, 2013 4:48 pm

Pat Kirwan wrote for CBS Sports that he noticed some wrinkles in the Jets offense when he was out in Cortland on Monday.

 

Brian Bassett, TheJetsBlog.com

 

As we speak, the Jets might not be the only ones getting in on the movement.  The Pistol is getting unveiled around the league in some of the most unlikely of places, just witness the news from Titansland, who showed some sets today in their training camp.

 

It should come as no surprise if the Jets practice odd packages like the Wildcat or Pistol. Rex Ryan said today in his presser that the concept of the Wildcat is “here to stay” because “it does give [the offense] the numbers back.”  By that, Rex means that eliminating the quarterback from the tackle box (setting him up in the slot, or as a flanker) allows an offensive front to match up evenly on a play instead of a man down.

Rex went on to say that “you’re seeing different guys [run the plays] … it doesn’t have to be the quarterback, but the fact that it is the quarterback, I think sometimes is even better than having a running back guy [run the plays].”

Then, by Rex’s own definition quoted (about the numbers) above, that’s not the Wildcat at all.  This non-Wildcat, but certainly different looking offense was seen on the field on Monday when Jets quarterbacks took snaps from four yards behind the center during practice and Ryan was sliding that little nugget in during his answer on the Wildcat question.

As Kirwan’s note above indicates, the Jets are installing the Pistol, in addition to the Wildcat, but some might not be quick to tell the difference.

The essence of the Pistol is lining up the quarterback four yards behind the center, but that’s about where the similarities between the Wildcat and Pistol end.  “It’s nothing like the Wildcat,” Trent Dilfer told the Reno Gazette Journal last week.  ”In fact, I’m starting to get offended by people comparing it to the Wildcat. It shows a lack of understanding of football. The Wildcat is a gimmicky run offense. The Pistol is the benefit of a shotgun offense, a downhill, I-back formation, you can get wishbone elements in it. There’s a lot of misdirection, and it gives the quarterback space to do a lot of things.”    If you are unfamiliar with the Pistol, here’s two great articles (NFPSBN) about the offense.  Dilfer called it  “the best offense we’ve seen in years, especially when you can combine West Coast passing principles with it.”

How convenient that the Jets have an offensive coordinator who has some of the deepest understanding of the West Coast in the NFL today!

At four yards back, the quarterback gets more time to react to the defense after the snap, while also getting a closer pre-snap look than the traditional seven yard shotgun.  From that anchor point, the traditional Pistol I-set can be used, as well as wishbone sets, shotgun sets, pro sets … etc.  It’s a jumping off point but any Pistolier still needs to be an excellent passer, which would eliminate a certain quarterback the Jets had on the roster last year who the Jets refused to let throw the football enough to make him an effective runner.

A shorter shotgun snap to quarterbacks would be a new element for the Jets offense, but would be for Mornhinweg’s Eagles offenses as well.  Rex Ryan said back in January that he wanted to add the Pistol to his offense, and while Marty Mornhinweg hasn’t used the formation, it’s an excellent dovetail to to his skillset, even more interesting with a read-option quarterback on the roster.

Rather than pick up the signals, the line of questioning during the presser forged deeper into Wildcatistan, which we all know shares a border with the Republic of Tebow.  (Yes, really)

Even so, Ryan again left a smoking gun with his answer when asked why the Jets didn’t just keep Tebow (one of the worst throwing quarterbacks in the league) to install this new offense:

“If [the Wildcat] is the only thing you do with that position, why don’t you just leave a running back in there, because he’s a guy that’s trained to do it. If you’re going to have a quarterback that has those skills (to run a specialty offense), like a Kaepernick or somebody like that, then it obviously becomes more of a weapon.”

A weapon like the Pistol?

 

QB coach David Lee is blending in some wildcat/pistol packages into the offense. It could be Jeremy [Kerley] at QB.

 

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Interesting article. Thanks! A lot of folks on this board are going to be mad about this because they think Geno's going to get killed. You know they're not putting this in for MS. If run properly Geno only has to run with the ball 3-4 X/game, and only when the "Read" calls for it. I'm OK with that. He is a football player after all, not glass. There are so many other options that can be run off that formation. Can't wait for the Pats game. Marty vs. Bellicheat and Rex vs. Brady.

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If Geno is the Opening Day starter, then it makes too much sense to install the Pistol. What better way to acclimate him into the league than to have him play out of the formation he's most comfortable in?

We have a history of forcing players into formations or schemes that don't fit their strengths. It's refreshing to see that they're no longer doing that.

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Rex Ryan said back in January that he wanted to add the Pistol to his offense, and while Marty Mornhinweg hasn’t used the formation, it’s an excellent dovetail to to his skillset, even more interesting with a read-option quarterback on the roster.

[..]

QB coach David Lee is blending in some wildcat/pistol packages into the offense. It could be Jeremy [Kerley] at QB.

  

This stuff is interesting to me because, in my mind, Rex Ryan is clearly involved in the offense. Mornhinweg didn't bring the pistol here, and while you could make the case that he's just maximizing the talent around him, he certainly didn't bring any wildcat plays. That -for better or worse- has Rex written all over it.

Geno Is a Pistol Q.B, how convenient that we just happen to be installing Pistol sets, and Read option Q.B plays. I wonder who the starting Q.B will be?

I wouldn't read to heavily into it. Geno is definitely being groomed to eventually start this year, but a handful of pistol plays would be a much better way to get him into games early a few plays at a time than the wildcat. That could be all this is - for now.

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This stuff is interesting to me because, in my mind, Rex Ryan is clearly involved in the offense. Mornhinweg didn't bring the pistol here, and while you could make the case that he's just maximizing the talent around him, he certainly didn't bring any wildcat plays. That -for better or worse- has Rex written all over it.

I wouldn't read to heavily into it. Geno is definitely being groomed to eventually start this year, but a handful of pistol plays would be a much better way to get him into games early a few plays at a time than the wildcat. That could be all this is - for now.

 

I think your half right here, but it is not from Rex directly it was Rex bringing in Lee to implement these formations he wanted in his offense, Lee was the real brains behind the Miami offensive formations in 2008, so it is Lee carrying out what Rex wants, but has no clue how to implement.  The best thing from what I can tell is MM is very open to learning ANY offense, and changing/adapting to the here, and now, and the talent he is presented with all while incorporating it into his version of the WCO, and if I am correct in that assessment I can see him, and Lee spending hours drawing up new plays, formations, and schemes feeding off of one another.

 

Again if I am correct in my observation no matter how bad the record is this year between the young talent on the Dline, and when Geno gets behind center, and they use these formations to help bring Geno along in a system like this that he is comfortable running, this will be the most entertaining Jets team to watch ON FIELD PERFORMANCE wise since the mid 80's Walton offense, and the sack exchange!

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I think your half right here, but it is not from Rex directly it was Rex bringing in Lee to implement these formations he wanted in his offense, Lee was the real brains behind the Miami offensive formations in 2008, so it is Lee carrying out what Rex wants, but has no clue how to implement.  The best thing from what I can tell is MM is very open to learning ANY offense, and changing/adapting to the here, and now, and the talent he is presented with all while incorporating it into his version of the WCO, and if I am correct in that assessment I can see him, and Lee spending hours drawing up new plays, formations, and schemes feeding off of one another.

 

Again if I am correct in my observation no matter how bad the record is this year between the young talent on the Dline, and when Geno gets behind center, and they use these formations to help bring Geno along in a system like this that he is comfortable running, this will be the most entertaining Jets team to watch ON FIELD PERFORMANCE wise since the mid 80's Walton offense, and the sack exchange!

Of course to the bold. But it's not like when Andy Reid wanted to get after the passer, he drew up defensive schemes for Jim Johnson. He delegated. Rex brought in the people to run the offense he wants. Just saying, contrary to popular opinion, he has some input on that side of the ball. The fact that he was talking about the pistol offense back in January (if we're to believe this article), well before Geno Smith was supposed to be available in the second round, is particularly interesting.

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This stuff is interesting to me because, in my mind, Rex Ryan is clearly involved in the offense. Mornhinweg didn't bring the pistol here, and while you could make the case that he's just maximizing the talent around him, he certainly didn't bring any wildcat plays. That -for better or worse- has Rex written all over it.

I wouldn't read to heavily into it. Geno is definitely being groomed to eventually start this year, but a handful of pistol plays would be a much better way to get him into games early a few plays at a time than the wildcat. That could be all this is - for now.

Pistol isn't something you run a handful of the time though. It's not the shotgun, or traditional under center, or Wildcat. The only way you get the Pistol to work is to be running it a majority of the time so that you keep your options with it open. I really think this could be a nail in the coffin for El Quarterback.

Edited by BleedGreen314
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Pistol isn't something you run a handful of the time though. It's not the shotgun, or traditional under center, or Wildcat. The only way you get the Pistol to work is to be running it a majority of the time so that you keep your options with it open. I really think this could be a nail in the coffin for El Quarterback.

Like I said, Geno is very definitely being groomed to start at some point this year. Whether its opening day or after the bye, he's going to get in there.

If the plan is to hold him back a little bit, having a package of plays for him from the pistol would be significantly smarter than having him run plays from the wildcat. Rather than trotting on the field for a single play, he could come in for a series at a time.

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Of course to the bold. But it's not like when Andy Reid wanted to get after the passer, he drew up defensive schemes for Jim Johnson. He delegated. Rex brought in the people to run the offense he wants. Just saying, contrary to popular opinion, he has some input on that side of the ball. The fact that he was talking about the pistol offense back in January (if we're to believe this article), well before Geno Smith was supposed to be available in the second round, is particularly interesting.

 

Couldn't agree more, and this is where I think Rex gets a little bad rap for not getting involved with the offense, he is involved the only way he knows how, and that is bringing in coaches that will do the things he wants to run on the offensive side of the ball, and oversee it going through the gameplan for the season/upcoming week.  Most of this is because he was forced to stick with B Schottenhiemer his first season, and had M Sanchez thrown in his lap by the front office, so this sealed Schotty being around more than 1 season along with the 2 succesful seasons to start, and then I also think Sparano was thrown at Rex by Mr T, and Rex might have seen the writing on the wall after the 2011 season that it was going to be a blame game from here on out between him, and Mr T.  I think this year was the first time in the 5 years Rex has been coach here he got to hand pick his offensive staff, they were all (most important guys anyway) hired before the GM was picked, and we all know Woody don't know Jack sh*t about the game of Football, so obviously Rex 100% got who HE wanted on that side of the ball.

 

The only thing Rex should be killed for as far as his teams lack of offense is the coaches he had run his teams offense, BUT we don't know if he actually had any say in that process last year, and we know he had ZERO say in that his first 3 years.  If I am correct in assuming Sparano was kinda forced on Rex by Mr. T by way of Parcells, who Woody would never argue against then this will be the first year Rex has full control of both sides of the ball in a way, and maybe he does deserve a 2nd chance as if this is his first year as the HC like in 2009, give him 2 years at the very least to see what he can do when the whole team, and coaching staff are in line with what he wants to do, not just the defense.

 

I know it is a lot of rambling, but I hope it makes sense whether you agree, or disagree.

Edited by Lupz27
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Of course to the bold. But it's not like when Andy Reid wanted to get after the passer, he drew up defensive schemes for Jim Johnson. He delegated. Rex brought in the people to run the offense he wants. Just saying, contrary to popular opinion, he has some input on that side of the ball. The fact that he was talking about the pistol offense back in January (if we're to believe this article), well before Geno Smith was supposed to be available in the second round, is particularly interesting.

 

To me the bolded sentence shows a couple of things. One, that yes Rex does have some ideas and input into the offense  IMO, the problem with that is some of his ideas are woefully out of date and ultraconservative, and others don't fit the talent or coaches he has.  Two, however. he doesn't understand the type of talent it takes to make such ideas work.  Sanchez is not a pistol QB due to his inaccuracy, even though being in the Pistol might help him play better.  Three, it's good that he doesn't try to install such things himself, but was smart enough to bring in someone who could do it right. If this year goes as well as it is beginning to look like it could and Rex is retained, I really, really hope that both Mornhinweg and Lee will stay, because I think they will have every bit as much of a positive impact on the play of the offense as Rex will on the D.

Edited by JoeKlecko
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Couldn't agree more, and this is where I think Rex gets a little bad rap for not getting involved with the offense, he is involved the only way he knows how, and that is bringing in coaches that will do the things he wants to run on the offensive side of the ball, and oversee it going through the gameplan for the season/upcoming week.  Most of this is because he was forced to stick with B Schottenhiemer his first season, and had M Sanchez thrown in his lap by the front office, so this sealed Schotty being around more than 1 season along with the 2 succesful seasons to start, and then I also think Sparano was thrown at Rex by Mr T, and Rex might have seen the writing on the wall after the 2011 season that it was going to be a blame game from here on out between him, and Mr T.  I think this year was the first time in the 5 years Rex has been coach here he got to hand pick his offensive staff, they were all (most important guys anyway) hired before the GM was picked, and we all know Woody don't know Jack sh*t about the game of Football, so obviously Rex 100% got who HE wanted on that side of the ball.

 

The only thing Rex should be killed for as far as his teams lack of offense is the coaches he had run his teams offense, BUT we don't know if he actually had any say in that process last year, and we know he had ZERO say in that his first 3 years.  If I am correct in assuming Sparano was kinda forced on Rex by Mr. T by way of Parcells, who Woody would never argue against then this will be the first year Rex has full control of both sides of the ball in a way, and maybe he does deserve a 2nd chance as if this is his first year as the HC like in 2009, give him 2 years at the very least to see what he can do when the whole team, and coaching staff are in line with what he wants to do, not just the defense.

 

I know it is a lot of rambling, but I hope it makes sense whether you agree, or disagree.

 

Sparano was NOT forced on Rex, but rather Rex' choice for OC, so you have that totally wrong.  Also, Rex wanted Sanchez.

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