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Seattle East mode? Good sign for Jets

January, 27, 2014

JAN 27

8:50

PM ET

 

By Rich Cimini | ESPN.com

 

 

 

Jets GM John Idzik will be at MetLife Stadium on Sunday, rooting for his former employer.

The New York Jets have gone 45 straight years without a Super Bowl, and now the big game has landed in their backyard. It might seem like the classic so-close-yet-so-far story -- a tease -- but Super Bowl XLVIII actually provides hope for the Jets.

 

 

 

In an era of wide-open passing attacks that produce video-game numbers, the Seattle Seahawks are a championship team built on old-fashioned tenets -- strong defense and a physical running. No matter how much other people try to change the game, the Seahawks refuse to eliminate the blue from their collar.

 

 

Basically, they're an upscale version of the Jets -- and that's not a knock on the Jets. No, it's validation that they're not too cool for old school.

 

 

"I wouldn't call us Seattle East, but there are parallels," Jets general manager John Idzik, a former Seahawks executive, said Monday in a phone interview.

 

 

He provided a few.

 

 

"Physically, they're a fast, athletic defense," Idzik said of the NFC champions. "Sounds familiar, doesn't it? They play a physical brand of football on both sides of the ball, and that comes from being strong up front. Sounds familiar, doesn't it? It sounds a little bit like us. There are definitely some similarities."

 

So true.

 

The Seahawks have a player-friendly coach, Pete Carroll, who made his bones on the defensive side of the ball. The Jets have Rex Ryan, the East Coast version of Carroll.

 

The Seahawks play an aggressive, man-to-man defense. So do the Jets.

 

The Seahawks pound the rock with Marshawn Lynch -- aka Beast Mode. The Jets have Chris Ivory, whose punishing running style mirrors that of Lynch.

 

The Seahawks found their franchise quarterback, former third-rounder Russell Wilson, after the first round of the draft. Idzik took the same approach in his first draft, picking Geno Smith in the second round. Smith isn't close to Wilson yet, and his development ultimately could determine if the Jets reach the Seahawks' level.

 

But don't forget, the Jets are only one year into the Idzik program. The Seahawks have been building for four years under the leadership of Carroll and general manager John Schneider, Idzik's former colleagues.

 

"You could see this coming," Idzik said of the Seahawks' journey to the Super Bowl. "Nothing in this league is a given, but to see it come to fruition is kind of cool."

 

Idzik spent five years in the Seahawks' front office, mostly managing the salary cap and handling contract negotiations. He was a holdover from the Mike Holmgren regime, but he quickly became a fan of the Carroll-Schneider philosophy.

 

Idzik expressed his admiration for the Seahawk Way, calling his old organization "a conglomeration of great people. This totally isn't a surprise. They're very good at what they do." He went on and on about the Seahawks, but he kept striking the same chord.

 

He emphasized the "synergy" between the front office, the coaching staff and the personnel department, a same-vision relationship that he believes has enabled the Seahawks to find some of their best players in the later rounds of the draft.

 

We mentioned Wilson, but there's also cornerback Richard Sherman, fifth round. Safety Kam Chancellor, fifth round. They also found talent in the trade market (Lynch) and free agency.

 

Idzik said the Seahawks have a "clear profile" of the characteristics they covet in players, some of whom he described as "plug-and-play" and others that "needed time on the runway." People forget the Seahawks went 7-9 in each of Carroll's first two seasons, finally clicking in 2012.

 

"The tenets of what we're doing here strike some similarities to what has happened in Seattle," said Idzik, who will attend Sunday's game and will be rooting for his old team.

 

Idzik delivered a strong first draft, netting five starters, and now we'll get a chance to see how he operates in free agency with actual money to spend. The Jets should be more than $30 million under the salary cap, giving them the flexibility they didn't have last offseason.

 

As for that Seattle synergy that Idzik described, it's hard to quantify, but it certainly appears that he and Ryan have a solid relationship. Idzik extended Ryan's contract, revamped the front office last offseason and tweaked the scouting staff. In theory, his people are in place. Now all they need is more players.

 

Idzik said he's not copy-catting the Seahawks' blueprint, but there's no doubt he's trying to incorporate Seattle's best into the Jets.

 

What about his former team's chances Sunday?

 

"Now," Idzik said, "I'd like to see them finish it off."

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I love how Seattle is all of a sudden the only team bucking the new trends of the NFL. Meanwhile, the Ravens won the Super Bowl last year built the same way and played a team built from the same vien in the 49'ers...those teams have sustained success with that formula. Seattle, Steelers, Panthers, Jets...its not like the Seahawks are the ony team attempting to build this way. The Jets success in Rex's early years were 100% predicated on Defense and G&P. It works but you need the right pieces and a QB who can elevate his play when necessary (Flacco, Big Ben, Wilson, Kap, Cam, etc).

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I love how Seattle is all of a sudden the only team bucking the new trends of the NFL.  Meanwhile, the Ravens won the Super Bowl last year built the same way and played a team built from the same vien in the 49'ers...those teams have sustained success with that formula.  Seattle, Steelers, Panthers, Jets...its not like the Seahawks are the ony team attempting to build this way.  The Jets success in Rex's early years were 100% predicated on Defense and G&P.  It works but you need the right pieces and the a QB who can elevate his play when necessary (Flacco, Big Ben, Wilson, Kap, Cam, etc).

 

:scare: 

 

BUT TEH ESPN MAN SAID IT WAS A PASSING LEAGUE

 

:akf:

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the league goes in cycles. we saw it with 4-3 to 3-4 about 10-15 years ago. the trend setters find success because talent for the new trend is relatively less expensive than for the schemes most teams are running. as the league started all moving to 3-4, 4-3 "talent" became cheaper and so started shifting back. with all the emphasis on passing, i would expect run blockers and RBs to be a relative bargain and maybe see a shift back a bit. as in most things in life it pays to be a leader not a follower. Bellicheat is a master of this like when he launched the current TE revival. now everyone has to have a stud TE and they are getting expensive.

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Then what happened?

 

Mostly attrition with a lack of a back up plan.  Too many bad contracts, too many traded picks/bad trades/bad picks, the guys they expected to step up didnt.  The 5th overall pick QB couldnt elevate his play to make up for some of the attrition.  Things like that will set you back a bit, in fact, it cripples most teams...luckily the Jets have a great Head Coach and it didnt devastate them like it would most teams. They've stayed largely competitive and always in the playoff conversation.  Just a shame that the Qb didnt hit...if that was the case, well then, this world would be a different place.

 

Hopefully this Idzik dude does a better job of building a sustainable long term winner.  He certainly has the right coaching staff in place.

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Awesome, so then alls they need is

OG

OT

PRusher

S

CB

RB (depending)

TE that can catch and block

Geno to play better and scramble more

WRs that can also catch and block

And depth

good thing the jets have 12 draft picks and $50m in cap room. think positive

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I love how Seattle is all of a sudden the only team bucking the new trends of the NFL. Meanwhile, the Ravens won the Super Bowl last year built the same way and played a team built from the same vien in the 49'ers...those teams have sustained success with that formula. Seattle, Steelers, Panthers, Jets...its not like the Seahawks are the ony team attempting to build this way. The Jets success in Rex's early years were 100% predicated on Defense and G&P. It works but you need the right pieces and a QB who can elevate his play when necessary (Flacco, Big Ben, Wilson, Kap, Cam, etc).

Yes, but the Ravens last year finally abandoned their version of Ground n Pound in the playoffs and went hurry-up, no-huddle high octane, let Flacco sling it around in the playoffs and lo and behold, they are holding the Lombardi.

You better have an offense capable of slinging it around when the other team starts putting 8 or 9 guys in the box, or hope like REX that you can win 3-0.

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Yes, but the Ravens last year finally abandoned their version of Ground n Pound in the playoffs and went hurry-up, no-huddle high octane, let Flacco sling it around in the playoffs and lo and behold, they are holding the Lombardi.

You better have an offense capable of slinging it around when the other team starts putting 8 or 9 guys in the box, or hope like REX that you can win 3-0.

 

You must have missed the part where I said, "you need a QB who can elevate their play".

 

Either way, the Ravens didnt abandon anything.  They ran the ball more than they threw and had great success with it during their SB run.  It was just that Flacco came up with big plays when they needed it and he was highly efficient when asked to throw (elevate their play), even though he's a mediocre QB.

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Mostly attrition with a lack of a back up plan. Too many bad contracts, too many traded picks/bad trades/bad picks, the guys they expected to step up didnt. The 5th overall pick QB couldnt elevate his play to make up for some of the attrition. Things like that will set you back a bit, in fact, it cripples most teams...luckily the Jets have a great Head Coach and it didnt devastate them like it would most teams. They've stayed largely competitive and always in the playoff conversation. Just a shame that the Qb didnt hit...if that was the case, well then, this world would be a different place.

Hopefully this Idzik dude does a better job of building a sustainable long term winner. He certainly has the right coaching staff in place.

I'm so glad there are people here not sick of typing this out. Rex is awesome, lets build a roster that doesn't require selling out the future. I really don't even get anymore what the Rex issue is. Oh noes he spoke too loudly in 2011!! Wooooooooooeeeeeeee!!!!

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I'm so glad there are people here not sick of typing this out. Rex is awesome, lets build a roster that doesn't require selling out the future. I really don't even get anymore what the Rex issue is. Oh noes he spoke too loudly in 2011!! Wooooooooooeeeeeeee!!!!

 

That's pretty much it.  Get some young studly talent on offense and the team is fine.  Coaching staff is solid.  GM seems to be smart.  He kept Rex so that a huge boost of confidence in him from an eye for talent perspective.

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the league goes in cycles. we saw it with 4-3 to 3-4 about 10-15 years ago. the trend setters find success because talent for the new trend is relatively less expensive than for the schemes most teams are running. as the league started all moving to 3-4, 4-3 "talent" became cheaper and so started shifting back. with all the emphasis on passing, i would expect run blockers and RBs to be a relative bargain and maybe see a shift back a bit. as in most things in life it pays to be a leader not a follower. Bellicheat is a master of this like when he launched the current TE revival. now everyone has to have a stud TE and they are getting expensive.

 

Yeah, because there were no star TEs in the NFL for like a decade before Gronkowski.... oh wait, there were Anthony Gonzalez, Antonio Gates, Todd Heap, Owen Daniels, Jason Witten, Dallas Clark, Heath Miller, Vernon Davis. 

 

Yeah, the rebirth of the TE was completely due to Belichick. 

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Yeah, because there were no star TEs in the NFL for like a decade before Gronkowski.... oh wait, there were Anthony Gonzalez, Antonio Gates, Todd Heap, Owen Daniels, Jason Witten, Dallas Clark, Heath Miller, Vernon Davis. 

 

Yeah, the rebirth of the TE was completely due to Belichick. 

 

can't find the facepalm icon quickly so this sentence will have to suffice.

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