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Meathead tread. All things lifting. *warning broscience*


Arsis
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Wow, at the beginning of this thread you were at 13% body fat. Already down 2% body fat in a week? yeah...i bet

Yeah, it's almost like I know what I'm doing. Three weeks + hard work + a good diet = results. There are no shortcuts.

Who would have thought... Nahh... It's this new magic diet! All you have to do is not eat carbs while sitting on your fat ass eating bacon and butter all day. Lmao

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Glysemic index? Does that exist? Glycogen stores in the muscle? Forget about it. Hey! I heard that carbohydrates can aid in muscle recovery after a workout.

Nahh... It's evil and bad. I can't people talking about complicated topics with an elementary school knowledge of the body.

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Yeah, it's almost like I know what I'm doing. Three weeks + hard work + a good diet = results. There are no shortcuts.

Who would have thought... Nahh... It's this new magic diet! All you have to do is not eat carbs while sitting on your fat ass eating bacon and butter all day. Lmao

But, you have no clue what your doing or saying.  And your are about as ignorant as they come on this board.  

 

Nobody on here is claiming a ketogenic diet is a new magic diet and nobody mentioned eating bacon n butter and sitting on their fat ass all day either.  Your literally just talking out of your ass now and making more of a mockery of yourself with each post. 

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Glysemic index? Does that exist? Glycogen stores in the muscle? Forget about it. Hey! I heard that carbohydrates can aid in muscle recovery after a workout.

Nahh... It's evil and bad. I can't people talking about complicated topics with an elementary school knowledge of the body.

Glycogen is a hydrated molecule, which can attract up to 4 grams of water per gram of glycogen.  So it would only makes sense that having more glycogen in the muscle would increase muscle size, right? But its simply just a side effect of fluid retention in the muscle....Let me put this in layman terms for you since weight lifting brain is so small...ITS ALL WATER WEIGHT.  ITS NOT MUSCLE HYPERTROPHY...all your doing is retaining water within your muscle. Your fckn clueless dude.

 

And yes glyCemic index does exist...it measures how a carbohydrate-containing food raises blood glucose...whats your point?  

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-10 lb

 

went to a wedding yesterday, stayed totally keto...salmon, salad with ranch and bacon.......i wasnt even hungry when i got there, plenty of energy to dance,...it was an afternoon reception, i ate lunch at 2pm, just having my first meal since now and was NOT hungry until about 8am.  took the dog for an hour walk up and down hills yesterday around 8-9pm...this is unreal!!!

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-10 lb

 

went to a wedding yesterday, stayed totally keto...salmon, salad with ranch and bacon.......i wasnt even hungry when i got there, plenty of energy to dance,...it was an afternoon reception, i ate lunch at 2pm, just having my first meal since now and was NOT hungry until about 8am.  took the dog for an hour walk up and down hills yesterday around 8-9pm...this is unreal!!!

awesome news.  

I agree with you about not being hungry. When i'm in keto all I have an appetite for is about 2 meals a day....no hunger pains whatsoever between meals either.  Major upside to the diet for sure.  And once your body gets adapt to using ketones and not glucose as your primary energy source..... it will actually run more efficiently off ketones than glucose. Same goes with fueling the brain.

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awesome news.  

I agree with you about not being hungry. When i'm in keto all I have an appetite for is about 2 meals a day....no hunger pains whatsoever between meals either.  Major upside to the diet for sure.  And once your body gets adapt to using ketones and not glucose as your primary energy source..... it will actually run more efficiently off ketones than glucose. Same goes with fueling the brain.

Thanks. Yesterday I did feel a little hungry for the majority of the day...I'm still running about 80/15/5. I think when I get to 2 weeks, I'll get the ratio more to 65/30/5. Pretty sure the protein is a lot to do with it. The lunch at the wedding was high protein and the difference in how I felt was pretty obvious. Today actually I worked in a half cup of Cabot 10% Milkfat, Greek Style yogurt. Man that was the thickest yogurt I've ever had. I think that protein really makes a difference. There are some natural sugars so I still did half, and not a whole cup. I left room for eggs, bacon and a second cup of coffee w/cream at the office... 

 

btw weekend total loss was about -3 lbs (i'm weighing myself as soon as I wake up and piss for consistency lol)

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Thanks. Yesterday I did feel a little hungry for the majority of the day...I'm still running about 80/15/5. I think when I get to 2 weeks, I'll get the ratio more to 65/30/5. Pretty sure the protein is a lot to do with it. The lunch at the wedding was high protein and the difference in how I felt was pretty obvious. Today actually I worked in a half cup of Cabot 10% Milkfat, Greek Style yogurt. Man that was the thickest yogurt I've ever had. I think that protein really makes a difference. There are some natural sugars so I still did half, and not a whole cup. I left room for eggs, bacon and a second cup of coffee w/cream at the office... 

 

btw weekend total loss was about -3 lbs (i'm weighing myself as soon as I wake up and piss for consistency lol)

Is your plan to go straight keto or you going to be working in carb days? I feel like the ketogenic diet works best when you go 6 days on and 1 day off. Seems like it prevents you from plateauing when its done that way.....helps with your sanity too.  I find myself making a list throughout the week of all the things I am going to eat on that carb day lol.

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Is your plan to go straight keto or you going to be working in carb days? I feel like the ketogenic diet works best when you go 6 days on and 1 day off. Seems like it prevents you from plateauing when its done that way.....helps with your sanity too.  I find myself making a list throughout the week of all the things I am going to eat on that carb day lol.

 

I'll work carbs back in at some point, to a reasonable level, but right now I am feeling great on straight keto for about 2 weeks now, as I get more creative/flexible with how to eat this way and not go nuts, it's incredible how flexible it is. Just gotta train yourself into how it's properly done. I'm not in any rush though to re-carb. Plenty of energy, any that is missing is due to calorie restriction not the keto. When I up calories like at the wedding, I feel even better than I do now.

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awesome news.  

I agree with you about not being hungry. When i'm in keto all I have an appetite for is about 2 meals a day....no hunger pains whatsoever between meals either.  Major upside to the diet for sure.  And once your body gets adapt to using ketones and not glucose as your primary energy source..... it will actually run more efficiently off ketones than glucose. Same goes with fueling the brain.

 

That's because what we think are hunger pains are actually pains associated with withdrawal from carbs. True hunger is supposedly felt in the throat area, not the gut. If you are in ketosis, then you've been without carbs long enough to have passed through withdrawal. So, it's not surprising that you don't feel gut cramps or "hunger pains". 

 

Read the book "Eat to Live". It's a much more sensible way to eat, that will help anyone lose weight just as effectively. You'll be better nourished and won't be completely reliant on ketosis for weight loss. 

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That's because what we think are hunger pains are actually pains associated with withdrawal from carbs. True hunger is supposedly felt in the throat area, not the gut. If you are in ketosis, then you've been without carbs long enough to have passed through withdrawal. So, it's not surprising that you don't feel gut cramps or "hunger pains". 

 

Read the book "Eat to Live". It's a much more sensible way to eat, that will help anyone lose weight just as effectively. You'll be better nourished and won't be completely reliant on ketosis for weight loss. 

 

I never said I was reliant on ketosis. I've lost weight many times on calorie cutting and exercise. I just am starting to prefer ketosis. We also spoke about hunger much earlier in this thread. Try to keep up

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I never said I was reliant on ketosis. I've lost weight many times on calorie cutting and exercise. I just am starting to prefer ketosis. We also spoke about hunger much earlier in this thread. Try to keep up

 

My response was to stugotz, you moron. I'll keep up when you stop mouth breathing.

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Carbs are a drug due to their impact on blood sugar, ketosis is an easy way to get off carbs because it allows zero tolerance. You eat carbs, you are out of ketosis for 1-2 days. There's also other benefits for weight loss as others have mentioned, but if you have the discipline to cut bad carbs while still eating fruits and veggies it's the better way to go, too many good micro nutrients and phytochemicals in fruits and veggies for a diet to be optimal without them.,

 

Eat the rainbow every day for optimal health and weight

 

//chugs DuClaw toffee brown ale and snickers at my own flagrant hypocrisy

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That's because what we think are hunger pains are actually pains associated with withdrawal from carbs. True hunger is supposedly felt in the throat area, not the gut. If you are in ketosis, then you've been without carbs long enough to have passed through withdrawal. So, it's not surprising that you don't feel gut cramps or "hunger pains". 

 

Read the book "Eat to Live". It's a much more sensible way to eat, that will help anyone lose weight just as effectively. You'll be better nourished and won't be completely reliant on ketosis for weight loss. 

Yes, I heard of this book before....it promotes eating a lot of vegetables and cutting out a lot of meat if I'm not mistaken....not for me my friend....i dislike 85% of all vegetables. Thank you though for this suggestion.  

 

And just to be clear on why I follow a ketogenic diet ...I do it because of the sustained energy I get all day....the anti inflammatory effects from the diet....it allows me to stay lean most importantly.  I am probably 10-11% body fat on average and have been as low as 7%.  I credit that all to keto of course.  So its more of a lifestyle for me than it is a diet.  And its not for everyone, i get that more than anybody.  But my body has never done well with handling carbs.  I eat carbs and then I bloat, I crash, I get sluggish, I get heartburn, I get body aches, etc etc.  So it was a choice I made years ago to follow this type of diet at least 80% of the time.  Its been working for me so far

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Yes, I heard of this book before....it promotes eating a lot of vegetables and cutting out a lot of meat if I'm not mistaken....not for me my friend....i dislike 85% of all vegetables. Thank you though for this suggestion.  

 

And just to be clear on why I follow a ketogenic diet ...I do it because of the sustained energy I get all day....the anti inflammatory effects from the diet....it allows me to stay lean most importantly.  I am probably 10-11% body fat on average and have been as low as 7%.  I credit that all to keto of course.  So its more of a lifestyle for me than it is a diet.  And its not for everyone, i get that more than anybody.  But my body has never done well with handling carbs.  I eat carbs and then I bloat, I crash, I get sluggish, I get heartburn, I get body aches, etc etc.  So it was a choice I made years ago to follow this type of diet at least 80% of the time.  Its been working for me so far

 

It does, it pushes for nutrient density and minimizes added fats and sugars. I wasn't morbidly obese, so there wasn't any reason for me to follow it religiously. I think I had about a 60-70% commitment to eating "whole foods" and lost about 40 pounds. Felt the best I'd felt in years.

 

I ate meat while doing it too. I had no interest in going vegan. I just changed the amount of meat and ration of meat to nutrient dense foods like veggies and legumes. 

 

I get the same feelings when I'm stuck on the carb addiction loop. Plus I get fat, fast.

 

Anyway, it's worth the read if you ever get around to it. CTM recommended it to me, changed my life.

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Yes, I heard of this book before....it promotes eating a lot of vegetables and cutting out a lot of meat if I'm not mistaken....not for me my friend....i dislike 85% of all vegetables. Thank you though for this suggestion.  

 

And just to be clear on why I follow a ketogenic diet ...I do it because of the sustained energy I get all day....the anti inflammatory effects from the diet....it allows me to stay lean most importantly.  I am probably 10-11% body fat on average and have been as low as 7%.  I credit that all to keto of course.  So its more of a lifestyle for me than it is a diet.  And its not for everyone, i get that more than anybody.  But my body has never done well with handling carbs.  I eat carbs and then I bloat, I crash, I get sluggish, I get heartburn, I get body aches, etc etc.  So it was a choice I made years ago to follow this type of diet at least 80% of the time.  Its been working for me so far

 

 

Amen

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It does, it pushes for nutrient density and minimizes added fats and sugars. I wasn't morbidly obese, so there wasn't any reason for me to follow it religiously. I think I had about a 60-70% commitment to eating "whole foods" and lost about 40 pounds. Felt the best I'd felt in years.

 

I ate meat while doing it too. I had no interest in going vegan. I just changed the amount of meat and ration of meat to nutrient dense foods like veggies and legumes. 

 

I get the same feelings when I'm stuck on the carb addiction loop. Plus I get fat, fast.

 

Anyway, it's worth the read if you ever get around to it. CTM recommended it to me, changed my life.

Im always open to learning so I will read for sure.....

 

but just out of curiosity, and if you dont mind sharing, what would this book have you consume over your typical day? What did your diet look like when you were losing that 40lbs?

 

I am always very intrigued in learning what people ate on a regular basis to lose any particular amount of weight...especially over 25lbs.

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Im always open to learning so I will read for sure.....

 

but just out of curiosity, and if you dont mind sharing, what would this book have you consume over your typical day? What did your diet look like when you were losing that 40lbs?

 

I am always very intrigued in learning what people ate on a regular basis to lose any particular amount of weight...especially over 25lbs.

 

Most days would got like this:

 

Breakfast:

3 eggs scrambled with about 2 cups of cooked veggies mixed in, omelet style basically. I'm a big fan of mushrooms, onions, peppers and broccoli in my eggs.

Sometimes, if my stomach didn't fair well with that much stuff first thing in the morning, I'd eat a slice of bread. The bread I buy is all whole foods, like 4 ingredients, no sh*t in it.

 

Or I'd eat like a 1/2 cup of oatmeal with peanut butter or walnuts, maybe a little bit of honey for taste (less than a teaspoon), with that I'd eat fruit, like an apple.

 

Lunch:

Salad, tons of veggies raw, extra virgin olive oil, squeeze of lemon and salt and pepper. I'd add protein like beans, egg and/or grilled chicken, probably about 3-4 ounces. Sometimes I ate tofu, but rarely, good tofu is hard to find - the cheap sh*t from what I'm told is as bad as eating hormone filled meat and processed foods. I didn't measure anything on this diet, I ate my face off, I just made sure most of it was veggies. It was really a lifestyle change - not a diet.

Again, if my stomach bothered me, a piece of high quality bread. Nothing on it, just nommed it to settle my volatile gut.

 

Snacks:

Nuts, sometimes granola or bars with very few ingredients, raw veggies and fruit, sometimes cold grilled chicken

 

Dinner: 

Usually a big plate of cooked veggies, cooked grains like brown rice, and a bit of meat. At this point I'd try and work in omega-3's if I hadn't had any earlier in day.

 

Weight melted off, I was eating an incredibly nutrient dense diet, eating a ton and didn't worry about carbs at all really - there was so few carbs or added fats in how I was eating, it was easy. The hard part was keeping the processed sh*t out of the house and NOT ordering the processed crap from take-out, which we've gotten back to doing since the wedding, move, pregnancy, move and baby arrival. Discipline has taken a back seat temporarily. We still make good, informed choices, but aren't as happy with how we eat as we were. 

 

There was like NO dairy in my diet at all, except some occasional yogurt for probiotics.

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Im always open to learning so I will read for sure.....

 

but just out of curiosity, and if you dont mind sharing, what would this book have you consume over your typical day? What did your diet look like when you were losing that 40lbs?

 

I am always very intrigued in learning what people ate on a regular basis to lose any particular amount of weight...especially over 25lbs.

 

At the end of the day all successful diets focus on eliminating processed foods like white grains, sugars and typical mass produced junk (high fructose corn syrup). That is common to all of them.

 

So that's where you start. 

 

I personally believe Paleo is the way to go, as i think low carb is too calorically dense and nutritionally deficient while something like Fuhrman is too restrictive and too anti meat

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At the end of the day all successful diets focus on eliminating processed foods like white grains, sugars and typical mass produced junk (high fructose corn syrup). That is common to all of them.

 

So that's where you start. 

 

I personally believe Paleo is the way to go, as i think low carb is too calorically dense and nutritionally deficient while something like Fuhrman is too restrictive and too anti meat

 

Personally, I can't adhere to anything structured. So, my approach is to learn what is good and bad, and try to eat way, way more of the good. When my life slows down a bit, then maybe structure can be introduced, but right now, I'm at a point where I stress eat out of sheer exhaustion. LOL

 

Hey, out of curiosity, have you read this yet? 

 

http://news.usc.edu/59199/meat-and-cheese-may-be-as-bad-for-you-as-smoking/

 

 

 

 

Meat and cheese may be as bad as smoking Eating animal proteins during middle age makes you a candidate for cancer
Wu_Suzanne-e1397625929434-100x100.jpgby Suzanne Wu March 4, 2014 Share this story
WEB_Salvatore_Caruso2.jpgPhoto: Like many residents of Molochio, a small Italian town which has one of the highest prevalences of centenarians in the world, Salvatore Caruso, 108, maintained a low-protein plant-based diet for the majority of his life. (Photo/Thierry de Lestrade)

That chicken wing you’re eating could be as deadly as a cigarette. In a new study that tracked a large sample of adults for nearly two decades, researchers have found that eating a diet rich in animal proteins during middle age makes you four times more likely to die of cancer than someone with a low-protein diet — a mortality risk factor comparable to smoking.

“There’s a misconception that because we all eat, understanding nutrition is simple. But the question is not whether a certain diet allows you to do well for three days, but can it help you survive to be 100?” said corresponding author Valter Longo, Edna M. Jones Professor of Biogerontology at the USC Davis School of Gerontology and director of the USC Longevity Institute. Longo has a joint appointment at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.

Not only is excessive protein consumption linked to a dramatic rise in cancer mortality, but middle-aged people who eat lots of proteins from animal sources — including meat, milk and cheese — are also more susceptible to early death in general, revealed the study published today in Cell Metabolism. Protein-lovers were 74 percent more likely to die of any cause within the study period than their more low-protein counterparts. They were also several times more likely to die of diabetes.

But how much protein one should eat has long been a controversial topic — muddled by the popularity of protein-heavy diets such as Paleo and Atkins. Before this study, researchers had never shown a definitive correlation between high-protein consumption and mortality risk.

Rather than look at adulthood as one monolithic phase of life, as other researchers have done, the latest study considers how biology changes as we age and how decisions in middle life may play out across the human life span.

In other words, what’s good for you at one age may be damaging at another. Protein controls the growth hormone IGF-I, which helps our bodies grow but has been linked to cancer susceptibility. Levels of IGF-I drop off dramatically after age 65, leading to potential frailty and muscle loss. The study shows that while high-protein intake during middle age is very harmful, it is protective for older adults: those over 65 who ate a moderate- or high-protein diet were less susceptible to disease.

The latest paper draws from Longo’s past research on IGF-I, including on an Ecuadorian cohort that seemed to have little cancer or diabetes susceptibility because of a genetic mutation that lowered levels of IGF-I; the members of the cohort were all less than 5-feet tall.

“The research shows that a low-protein diet in middle age is useful for preventing cancer and overall mortality, through a process that involves regulating IGF-I and possibly insulin levels,” said co-author Eileen Crimmins, holder of the AARP Chair in Gerontology at USC. “However, we also propose that at older ages, it may be important to avoid a low-protein diet to allow the maintenance of healthy weight and protection from frailty.”

Crucially, the researchers found that plant-based proteins, such as those from beans, did not seem to have the same mortality effects as animal proteins. Rates of cancer and death also did not seem to be affected by controlling for carbohydrate or fat consumption, suggesting that animal protein is the main culprit.

“The majority of Americans are eating about twice as much proteins as they should, and it seems that the best change would be to lower the daily intake of all proteins but especially animal-derived proteins,” Longo said. “But don’t get extreme in cutting out protein; you can go from protected to malnourished very quickly.”

Longo’s findings support recommendations from several leading health agencies to consume about 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight every day in middle age. For example, a 130-pound person should eat about 45 to 50 grams of protein a day, with preference for those derived from plants such as legumes, Longo explained.

The researchers defined a high-protein diet as deriving at least 20 percent of calories from protein, including both plant-based and animal-based protein. A “moderate” protein diet includes 10 to 19 percent of calories from protein, and a low-protein diet includes less than 10 percent protein.

Even moderate amounts of protein had detrimental effects during middle age, the researchers found. Across all 6,318 adults over the age of 50 in the study, average protein intake was about 16 percent of total daily calories with about two-thirds from animal protein — corresponding to data about national protein consumption. The study sample was representative across ethnicity, education and health backgrounds.

People who ate a moderate amount of protein were still three times more likely to die of cancer than those who ate a low-protein diet in middle age, the study showed. Overall, even the small change of decreasing protein intake from moderate levels to low levels reduced likelihood of early death by 21 percent.

For a randomly selected smaller portion of the sample — 2,253 people — levels of the growth hormone IGF-I were recorded directly. The results showed that for every 10 ng/ml increase in IGF-I, those on a high-protein diet were 9 percent more likely to die from cancer than those on a low-protein diet, in line with past research associating IGF-I levels to cancer risk.

The researchers also extended their findings about high-protein diets and mortality risk, looking at causality in mice and cellular models. In a study of tumor rates and progression among mice, the researchers showed lower cancer incidence and 45 percent smaller average tumor size among mice on a low-protein diet than those on a high-protein diet by the end of the two-month experiment.

“Almost everyone is going to have a cancer cell or pre-cancer cell in them at some point. The question is: Does it progress?” Longo said. “Turns out one of the major factors in determining if it does is protein intake.

Morgan Levine, Jorge Suarez and Pinchas Cohen of USC Davis were co-authors of the study. The research was funded by the National Institute of Aging of the National Institutes of Health (grants numbers AG20642, AG025135, AG034906, P30AG017265 and T32AG0037) and a USC Norris Cancer Center pilot grant given to Longo.

 

 

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Fauja Singh was born in Beas Pind, Jalandhar, Punjab, British India on 1 April 1911,[5] the youngest of four children. Fauja did not develop the ability to walk until he was five years old. His legs were thin and weak, and he could hardly walk long distances. Because of this, he was often teased, and had to carry the nickname "danda" (Punjabi: दण्ड) for the next ten years. As a young man, Fauja was an avid amateur runner, but he had to give it up and return to farming due to the 1947 India-Pakistan Partition.

It was only after witnessing the death of his fifth son, Kuldip, in a construction accident in August 1994, that Fauja returned to his passion for running, in 1995. The deaths of his wife in 1992, and his eldest daughter who had died from complications after giving birth to his third granddaughter, gave him the determination for this new focus in life.[1] He emigrated to England in the 1990s and lives with one of his sons in Ilford.[21]

At 89 years, he took seriously to running and ended up in international marathon events. When he first turned up for training at Redbridge, Essex, he was dressed in a three-piece suit. The coach had to rework everything, including his attire. Singh ran his first race, the London Marathon, in 2000.[22] According to his coach, he used to run up to 20 kilometres easily and wanted to run a marathon, thinking it to be just 26 kilometres and not 26 miles (42 kilometres). It was after he realised this that he began training seriously.[23]

Singh shot to fame when, at the age of 93, he completed the gruelling 26.2 mile distance in 6 hours and 54 minutes. This knocked 58 minutes off the previous world best for anyone in the 90-plus age bracket.[5]

Singh is 172 cm (5 ft 8 in) tall and weighs 52 kg (115 lb). He attributes his physical fitness and longevity to abstaining from smoking and alcohol and to following a simple vegetarian diet.[24] He has been quoted as saying "I am very careful about different foods. My diet is simple phulka, dal, green vegetables, yogurt and milk. I do not touch parathas, pakoras, rice or any other fried food. I take lots of water and tea with ginger. ... I go to bed early taking the name of my Rabba (God) as I don’t want all those negative thoughts crossing my mind."[5]

Speaking about the marathon, he said: "The first 20 miles are not difficult. As for last six miles, I run while talking to God."[5]

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Most days would got like this:

 

Breakfast:

3 eggs scrambled with about 2 cups of cooked veggies mixed in, omelet style basically. I'm a big fan of mushrooms, onions, peppers and broccoli in my eggs.

Sometimes, if my stomach didn't fair well with that much stuff first thing in the morning, I'd eat a slice of bread. The bread I buy is all whole foods, like 4 ingredients, no sh*t in it.

 

Or I'd eat like a 1/2 cup of oatmeal with peanut butter or walnuts, maybe a little bit of honey for taste (less than a teaspoon), with that I'd eat fruit, like an apple.

 

Lunch:

Salad, tons of veggies raw, extra virgin olive oil, squeeze of lemon and salt and pepper. I'd add protein like beans, egg and/or grilled chicken, probably about 3-4 ounces. Sometimes I ate tofu, but rarely, good tofu is hard to find - the cheap sh*t from what I'm told is as bad as eating hormone filled meat and processed foods. I didn't measure anything on this diet, I ate my face off, I just made sure most of it was veggies. It was really a lifestyle change - not a diet.

Again, if my stomach bothered me, a piece of high quality bread. Nothing on it, just nommed it to settle my volatile gut.

 

Snacks:

Nuts, sometimes granola or bars with very few ingredients, raw veggies and fruit, sometimes cold grilled chicken

 

Dinner: 

Usually a big plate of cooked veggies, cooked grains like brown rice, and a bit of meat. At this point I'd try and work in omega-3's if I hadn't had any earlier in day.

 

Weight melted off, I was eating an incredibly nutrient dense diet, eating a ton and didn't worry about carbs at all really - there was so few carbs or added fats in how I was eating, it was easy. The hard part was keeping the processed sh*t out of the house and NOT ordering the processed crap from take-out, which we've gotten back to doing since the wedding, move, pregnancy, move and baby arrival. Discipline has taken a back seat temporarily. We still make good, informed choices, but aren't as happy with how we eat as we were. 

 

There was like NO dairy in my diet at all, except some occasional yogurt for probiotics.

Thats a solid diet.  I give you credit with eating veggies at every meal.  

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At the end of the day all successful diets focus on eliminating processed foods like white grains, sugars and typical mass produced junk (high fructose corn syrup). That is common to all of them.

 

So that's where you start. 

 

I personally believe Paleo is the way to go, as i think low carb is too calorically dense and nutritionally deficient while something like Fuhrman is too restrictive and too anti meat

I get a lot of nutrients every week as I completely chill in ketosis.  Between all the broccoli, squash, rasperberries, blackberries, almonds, seeds....i feel like i cover most bases.  

 

Ive done Paleo type diets from time to time over the years when i want to take a break from keto for awhile....my only beef with the diet is the no dairy...i love cheese.  

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