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ESPN POLL OF NFL EXECS NAMES GENO SMITH "WORST" STARTING QB IN NFL.


T0mShane
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What circumstances were those? That Ryan was a first-time head coach who had been passed over by his own prior team (and others), and based on that he was the one who was the power behind the throne over the guy who actually gave him his one shot? 

 

Talk about seeing the world through reality-altering glasses.  You must not own a mirror.

 

I don't own a mirror, when I moved into my house I had them all removed so I would not have to look at my ugliness. Imagine the brother in the cage from the Goonies and Susan Waldman had a love child.... I would make that cat look handsome.

 

Whether you want to acknowledge it or not, I honestly don't really care. I am as confident in my convictions as you and your fellow band of Rex lovers are. 

 

Tannenbaum was made GM for Mangini to act as Paoli acted for Bellicheck. Woody not only wanted to hire Bellicheck's most prized pupil in Mangini, but he also wanted to institute the same system, and have Mangini be Bellicheck, and Tannenbaum be Paoli. 

 

As dumb as Woody is, and he is REALLY fn dumb (almost as dumb as me), I dont think even he was dumb enough to think Tanny was a traditional GM, he literally had zero background for it.

 

When Mangini was rightfully canned, Tanny did not magically develop a personnel background, and the Jets put Rex in the exact same role as Mangini was in.

 

I am sure you will dispute this, but you are 100% wrong.

 

The only thing I will add is I don't think neither Tanny nor Rex were the ones clammering to draft a QB high in that first draft, I believe that was Woody's mandate. I just think Rex was the one who chose Sanchez over Freeman, but realistically they both sucked balls.

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I did too, even wished we could have kept him. But, the fact that he basically was out of the league once he left here should tell people something too.

The issue wasn't dumping Braylon, it was in replacing him with noted cancers Derrick Mason and Plaxico Burress.

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While your dissertation is impressive in magnitude, and I applaud your will (It's far greater than mine) you have surmised something that I never said, and proceeded to write an enormous post to disprove something I did not say.

 

False.  You alleged all the things I countered, most notably that Tannenbaum was a GM in name only and that it was really Ryan who was the boss of his employer(s). Not only baseless, it counters things that were made public. The time Ryan would have had the most power, if you believe what you say, would have been Tannenbaum's final season.  And what did he do? He burned the Jets' 2nd, 5th, and 7th round picks on a WR that Ryan didn't want, wouldn't have drafted (certainly not that early), and said as much to the press after the pick.

 

This alone would be impossible under your premise. 

 

Tannenbaum was the GM.  Ryan was the HC.  Tannenbaum was Ryan's boss.  Ryan was Tannenbaum's subordinate.  

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I don't own a mirror, when I moved into my house I had them all removed so I would not have to look at my ugliness. Imagine the brother in the cage from the Goonies and Susan Waldman had a love child.... I would make that cat look handsome.

 

Whether you want to acknowledge it or not, I honestly don't really care. I am as confident in my convictions as you and your fellow band of Rex lovers are. 

 

Tannenbaum was made GM for Mangini to act as Paoli acted for Bellicheck. Woody not only wanted to hire Bellicheck's most prized pupil in Mangini, but he also wanted to institute the same system, and have Mangini be Bellicheck, and Tannenbaum be Paoli. 

 

As dumb as Woody is, and he is REALLY fn dumb (almost as dumb as me), I dont think even he was dumb enough to think Tanny was a traditional GM, he literally had zero background for it.

 

When Mangini was rightfully canned, Tanny did not magically develop a personnel background, and the Jets put Rex in the exact same role as Mangini was in.

 

I am sure you will dispute this, but you are 100% wrong.

 

The only thing I will add is I don't think neither Tanny nor Rex were the ones clammering to draft a QB high in that first draft, I believe that was Woody's mandate. I just think Rex was the one who chose Sanchez over Freeman, but realistically they both sucked balls.

 

 

Tannenbaum did not develop a pure-football background, which is why you saw him generally picking up expensive veterans and trading away draft picks for the privilege.  These were the acts of a GM who does not believe in his own ability to find lower-priced talent or draft talent.  I don't see how anyone could think otherwise.  Tannenbaum was what Tannenbaum was.  And among those things, he was Ryan's boss up to the day Johnson fired him.

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Tannenbaum did not develop a pure-football background, which is why you saw him generally picking up expensive veterans and trading away draft picks for the privilege. These were the acts of a GM who does not believe in his own ability to find lower-priced talent or draft talent. I don't see how anyone could think otherwise. Tannenbaum was what Tannenbaum was. And among those things, he was Ryan's boss up to the day Johnson fired him.

Not true

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Not true

Lol, sure.  Tannenbaum didn't trade away draft picks for other teams' veterans. Tannenbaum didn't sign high-priced free agents and build a very top-heavy roster with little quality depth.  It was really Ryan working the phones to players and agents all over the country, because this is his skill and this is his thing, and then relayed these discussions to Tannenbaum who was then only in charge of drawing up the contracts.  Right.  Never mind that this was a practice of his before he hired Ryan (though Mangini thought he knew everything about everything and was a control freak, and Tannenbaum seems to have trusted the Wellesley guy's judgment more, probably thinking he had just hired Belichick Jr.).

 

Tannenbaum was the GM.  Idzik is now the GM.  Sorry to disappoint you, as I know it flies in the face of your narrative.  

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Lol, sure. Tannenbaum didn't trade away draft picks for other teams' veterans. Tannenbaum didn't sign high-priced free agents and build a very top-heavy roster with little quality depth. It was really Ryan working the phones to players and agents all over the country, because this is his skill and this is his thing, and then relayed these discussions to Tannenbaum who was then only in charge of drawing up the contracts. Right. Never mind that this was a practice of his before he hired Ryan (though Mangini thought he knew everything about everything and was a control freak, and Tannenbaum seems to have trusted the Wellesley guy's judgment more, probably thinking he had just hired Belichick Jr.).

Tannenbaum was the GM. Idzik is now the GM. Sorry to disappoint you, as I know it flies in the face of your narrative.

Tannenbaum built the team that Rex wanted him to build, it's really that simple.

Rex believed they were closer then they were and convinced Tanny and Woody so.

Tanny acted like the Broncos are acting now, which is justifiable if you are really that close.

The real problem was that Rex was and is clueless in understanding what Sanchez was, and how far away they really were as a result.

If you don't see that, I really can't help you.

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Mark Sanchez was actually a member of a supper secret Bill Belichick splinter cell.  Belichick planted Sanchez in the Jets locker room, had him destroy the Super Bowl hopes of an otherwise championship ready franchise, and fracture the locker room from the inside out.  Now, to calm suspicions, Sanchez is laying low in Philadelphia, where he will wait for Brady to retire and then reunite with Belichick.

 

Don't believe me?  Revis was the first....

Edited by gEYno
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Tannenbaum built the team that Rex wanted him to build, it's really that simple.

Rex believed they were closer then they were and convinced Tanny and Woody so.

Tanny acted like the Broncos are acting now, which is justifiable if you are really that close.

The real problem was that Rex was and is clueless in understanding what Sanchez was, and how far away they really were as a result.

If you don't see that, I really can't help you.

 

K.  I'm sure as a defensive coordinator with no GM or head coaching experience that Ryan's first requirement was to dump their high-priced starting DE, a young DB that a lot of people in the organization (as well as the outgoing HC) liked, and also use the team's first 2 picks on a college QB whose contract would affect the ability to sign even more defensive players.  And that this entire first draft (3 more picks on Shonn Greene) would contain zero defensive prospects.  

 

A month into the season, two more draft picks were traded away for a WR.  

 

And then the following season, after taking Kyle Wilson in the 1st round (remember, Revis was holding out at the time and Manning had just picked the secondary apart by playing keep away from Revis), Ryan felt the next 3 picks also should be spent on offense.  Excuse me -- 4 picks, since another was traded for Santonio Holmes.  

 

Because it was Ryan, as Tannenbaum's de facto boss, who was non-stop obsessed with improving the Jets' offense by disproportionately using these resources on that side of the ball.  This is what you're saying?

 

lol

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K.  I'm sure as a defensive coordinator with no GM or head coaching experience that Ryan's first requirement was to dump their high-priced starting DE, a young DB that a lot of people in the organization (as well as the outgoing HC) liked, and also use the team's first 2 picks on a college QB whose contract would affect the ability to sign even more defensive players.  And that this entire first draft (3 more picks on Shonn Greene) would contain zero defensive prospects.  

 

A month into the season, two more draft picks were traded away for a WR.  

 

And then the following season, after taking Kyle Wilson in the 1st round (remember, Revis was holding out at the time and Manning had just picked the secondary apart by playing keep away from Revis), Ryan felt the next 3 picks also should be spent on offense.  Excuse me -- 4 picks, since another was traded for Santonio Holmes.  

 

Because it was Ryan, as Tannenbaum's de facto boss, who was non-stop obsessed with improving the Jets' offense by disproportionately using these resources on that side of the ball.  This is what you're saying?

 

lol

 

blah... mine's better ;)

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K. I'm sure as a defensive coordinator with no GM or head coaching experience that Ryan's first requirement was to dump their high-priced starting DE, a young DB that a lot of people in the organization (as well as the outgoing HC) liked, and also use the team's first 2 picks on a college QB whose contract would affect the ability to sign even more defensive players. And that this entire first draft (3 more picks on Shonn Greene) would contain zero defensive prospects.

A month into the season, two more draft picks were traded away for a WR.

And then the following season, after taking Kyle Wilson in the 1st round (remember, Revis was holding out at the time and Manning had just picked the secondary apart by playing keep away from Revis), Ryan felt the next 3 picks also should be spent on offense. Excuse me -- 4 picks, since another was traded for Santonio Holmes.

Because it was Ryan, as Tannenbaum's de facto boss, who was non-stop obsessed with improving the Jets' offense by disproportionately using these resources on that side of the ball. This is what you're saying?

lol

I'm not sure how much more clear I can be

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Mark Sanchez was actually a member of a supper secret Bill Belichick splinter cell. Belichick planted Sanchez in the Jets locker room, had him destroy the Super Bowl hopes of an otherwise championship ready franchise, and fracture the locker room from the inside out. Now, to calm suspicions, Sanchez is laying low in Philadelphia, where he will wait for Brady to retire and then reunite with Belichick.

Don't believe me? Revis was the first....

To further this, who traded Sanchez to the Jets? Prodigal Belichick disciple Eric Mangini.

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blah... mine's better ;)

 

 

 

1. I was already in the middle of writing a post (shocker) while yours was posted.

2. Nope. I like mine better.  The cute narrative that Ryan is and has been the team's real GM, and upon getting hired, disproportionately used the bulk of the team's draft picks (not to mention trades away defensive starters) to select draftees who play offense, even though everyone knows all he cares about is defense and has always ignored the offense.  

 

Within the first 14 months with Ryan as HC (keep in mind, the claim is that he's really the GM behind the scenes), the Jets drafted, traded for, or signed in free agency:

  • a starting QB (2 draft picks - a #1 and a #2 - plus 2 defensive players, plus Ratliff the pre-season studmuffin)
  • a backup QB (1 draft pick)
  • another backup QB (way past his prime former pro bowler, really to help coach/mentor the starter, like he did with Brees the prior 2 seasons)
  • a RB (3 draft picks)
  • another RB (FA HOF RB, past his prime but still starting/productive when healthy)
  • yet another RB (draft pick)
  • a FB (draft pick)
  • 2 WRs (2 draft picks on a 26 year-old former #3 pick with a pro bowl season under his belt, another pick for the incumbent superbowl MVP)
  • 3 OLmen (one a higher pick, one a lower pick), and re-signed one of their OL starters who was a FA
[because he's really the team's GM, and also we know he completely ignores the offense because he doesn't think it's important.  This position is totally consistent with the above history.  And this is what's called being clear.

 

Apparently what's far less likely than all of the above is that the team's GM is, in fact, the team's GM. This GM uses team resources on offense, and he uses team resources on defense. Most of the starters are players who were higher draft picks, panic moves where we trade up rather than waiting for our pick, expensive (or not-cheap) free agents, or veterans who were acquired for still more draft picks, because the GM doesn't have much scouting/personnel background beyond what he's learned on the job.  

 

Despite history that is totally consistent with what is right in front of everyone's eyes, this is not really what's going on.  The GM is the GM in name alone, and is hired and re-upped for the better part of a decade because of his wonderful personality, charm, and people skills.  And because he can use Excel.

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1. I was already in the middle of writing a post (shocker) while yours was posted.

2. Nope. I like mine better. The cute narrative that Ryan is and has been the team's real GM, and upon getting hired, disproportionately used the bulk of the team's draft picks (not to mention trades away defensive starters) to select draftees who play offense, even though everyone knows all he cares about is defense and has always ignored the offense.

Within the first 14 months with Ryan as HC (keep in mind, the claim is that he's really the GM behind the scenes), the Jets drafted, traded for, or signed in free agency:

  • a starting QB (2 draft picks - a #1 and a #2 - plus 2 defensive players, plus Ratliff the pre-season studmuffin)
  • a backup QB (1 draft pick)
  • another backup QB (way past his prime former pro bowler, really to help coach/mentor the starter, like he did with Brees the prior 2 seasons)
  • a RB (3 draft picks)
  • another RB (FA HOF RB, past his prime but still starting/productive when healthy)
  • yet another RB (draft pick)
  • a FB (draft pick)
  • 2 WRs (2 draft picks on a 26 year-old former #3 pick with a pro bowl season under his belt, another pick for the incumbent superbowl MVP)
  • 3 OLmen (one a higher pick, one a lower pick), and re-signed one of their OL starters who was a FA
Because he's really the team's GM, and also we know he completely ignores the offense because he doesn't think it's important. This position is totally consistent with the above history. And this is what's called being clear.

Apparently what's far less likely than all of the above is that the team's GM is, in fact, the team's GM. This GM uses team resources on offense, and he uses team resources on defense. Most of the starters are players who were higher draft picks, panic moves where we trade up rather than waiting for our pick, expensive (or not-cheap) free agents, or veterans who were acquired for still more draft picks, because the GM doesn't have much scouting/personnel background beyond what he's learned on the job.

Despite history that is totally consistent with what is right in front of everyone's eyes, this is not really what's going on. The GM is the GM in name alone, and is hired and re-upped for the better part of a decade because of his wonderful personality, charm, and people skills. And because he can use Excel.

Just stop. He came here and the accountant did his and Woody's bidding and it exploded in their faces, and they threw the accountant overboard. What's wrong in admitting that? They went out and chased headlines with thugs and "swagger," and it failed miserably, and they had to go hire an adult to clean it up while relegating the de facto Head Coach to the back of the bus. He's on a one year deal. Going back to talk about how powerless he was with Sanchez or Edwards or Holmes doesn't help your case, it just shows how weak and desperate the "Head Coach" really is.

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1. I was already in the middle of writing a post (shocker) while yours was posted.

2. Nope. I like mine better. The cute narrative that Ryan is and has been the team's real GM, and upon getting hired, disproportionately used the bulk of the team's draft picks (not to mention trades away defensive starters) to select draftees who play offense, even though everyone knows all he cares about is defense and has always ignored the offense.

Within the first 14 months with Ryan as HC (keep in mind, the claim is that he's really the GM behind the scenes), the Jets drafted, traded for, or signed in free agency:

  • a starting QB (2 draft picks - a #1 and a #2 - plus 2 defensive players, plus Ratliff the pre-season studmuffin)
  • a backup QB (1 draft pick)
  • another backup QB (way past his prime former pro bowler, really to help coach/mentor the starter, like he did with Brees the prior 2 seasons)
  • a RB (3 draft picks)
  • another RB (FA HOF RB, past his prime but still starting/productive when healthy)
  • yet another RB (draft pick)
  • a FB (draft pick)
  • 2 WRs (2 draft picks on a 26 year-old former #3 pick with a pro bowl season under his belt, another pick for the incumbent superbowl MVP)
  • 3 OLmen (one a higher pick, one a lower pick), and re-signed one of their OL starters who was a FA
Because he's really the team's GM, and also we know he completely ignores the offense because he doesn't think it's important. This position is totally consistent with the above history. And this is what's called being clear.

Apparently what's far less likely than all of the above is that the team's GM is, in fact, the team's GM. This GM uses team resources on offense, and he uses team resources on defense. Most of the starters are players who were higher draft picks, panic moves where we trade up rather than waiting for our pick, expensive (or not-cheap) free agents, or veterans who were acquired for still more draft picks, because the GM doesn't have much scouting/personnel background beyond what he's learned on the job.

Despite history that is totally consistent with what is right in front of everyone's eyes, this is not really what's going on. The GM is the GM in name alone, and is hired and re-upped for the better part of a decade because of his wonderful personality, charm, and people skills. And because he can use Excel.

You know what's interesting ...

I find your stance to be as ludicrous as you find mine.

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Mark Sanchez was actually a member of a supper secret Bill Belichick splinter cell.  Belichick planted Sanchez in the Jets locker room, had him destroy the Super Bowl hopes of an otherwise championship ready franchise, and fracture the locker room from the inside out.  Now, to calm suspicions, Sanchez is laying low in Philadelphia, where he will wait for Brady to retire and then reunite with Belichick.

 

Don't believe me?  Revis was the first....

 

That diabolical son of a bitch! :akf:

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Just stop. He came here and the accountant did his and Woody's bidding and it exploded in their faces, and they threw the accountant overboard. What's wrong in admitting that? They went out and chased headlines with thugs and "swagger," and it failed miserably, and they had to go hire an adult to clean it up while relegating the de facto Head Coach to the back of the bus. He's on a one year deal. Going back to talk about how powerless he was with Sanchez or Edwards or Holmes doesn't help your case, it just shows how weak and desperate the "Head Coach" really is.

 

You can stop yourself.  I think there are some players he had interest in that he knew, and were brought in from year 1 (e.g. Scott) to the middle of this past year (Ed Reed).  In between that, the scenario that has been painted is more of Tannenbaum finding names, particularly more familiar ones, and going to Ryan and saying, "Hey, what do you think about me bringing in _____?" (e.g. Holmes, Plaxico).  

Ryan doesn't deal with cap management; all he can see is the player who's being brought in (not considering how long that person's locked in here until).  The immediate cost to him on gameday is bumping the lowest guy.  So Braylon Edwards doesn't replace someone valuable; he bumps off Chansi Stuckey.  Santonio Holmes doesn't replace Cotchery; he replaces a 5th round pick that has no name or face yet, and he replaces David Clowney.  From a head coach's perspective, this helps him on gameday.  But like shoving food in his mouth indiscriminately, he says no to nothing.  Offer Sanchez an extension? Sure; we don't have anyone any better to replace him with anyway. Never mind that this is your QB next year and, barring injury or GM replacement, the year after that as well.

 

He also gets attached to players, which I don't think anyone doubts, to a fault.  I think it's a prime reason the Jets brought in Patterson instead of bringing back Cromartie.  The CB market is stupidly overpriced right now and so far Idzik (among other things) comes across as very much a bean-counter type who feels the position has a ceiling after which you're overpaying with dollars that would be better-served elsewhere (or spread around).  He has 12 draft picks and he's going to take a cornerback. In a perfect world this young kid will play earlier rather than later.  But if Ryan is too chummy with Cromartie, and in particular if there's concern about one of the longer-tenured veterans taking a seat for a rookie here & there, then that muddies the situation.  He only wants the $3M veteran in for just this year, and it'll be less disruptive to bench Patterson than Cromartie.  And it would be somewhat true even if there was a new HC this season. That's what I think a lot of it was, anyway.

 

I don't at all believe that Tannenbaum was here to lay down his life or career for the whims of a first time head coach who only had experience on one side of the ball.  One could maybe make this argument for a GM who was brought in while Ryan was already here (Idzik) but it already seems clear that's not happening.

 

Ryan got maybe 1 draft pick per season, and that's IF too many picks weren't already used up by trading up or trading them away for veterans.

 

Go look at that list of all the players brought in on offense over the first 2 years.  Clearly more players on offense were brought in to upgrade than were brought in for the defense to upgrade.  It is the opposite of the picture you've painted, where Ryan would sacrifice everything for his precious defense.  If he's the GM-HC he's not dumping all those resources into the offense while skating by with the likes of Brodney Pool starting in his beloved secondary, let alone Marques Douglas past his prime over an in his prime Kenyon Coleman, so he could start a rookie QB with barely any college experience, let alone pro experience.

 

I think he's made some ridiculous boneheaded decisions as HC over the years.  And I also think he's learned from some of them, and hope he's learned from others.  Just as I also think other coaches make boneheaded decisions and learn from them when they blow up in their faces.

 

And in either case, he isn't and wasn't the GM.  I do think the new one is stronger than the past one, and a major reason is a belief that he doesn't have to go balls deep in overpriced veterans, or trading up in the draft, to adequately fill a hole.  In general, I think he has confidence in his ability to fill positions with draft picks (even if that confidence is misplaced), and I think he has the patience to not panic into making bad, major moves.  Some say to a fault, but I prefer that to the former method (so far).

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Yet Sperm actually posts facts and legitimate fact-based analysis and you just make moronic comments.

Your stance isn't what is ludicrous, you are.

Of course, you happen to agree with him because u both love Rex.

Can I ask why you Rex worshippers feel the need to lash out with personal attacks based only opinion of Rex ?

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You can stop yourself.

Says you.

I think there are some players he had interest in that he knew, and were brought in from year 1 (e.g. Scott) to the middle of this past year (Ed Reed). In between that, the scenario that has been painted is more of Tannenbaum finding names, particularly more familiar ones, and going to Ryan and saying, "Hey, what do you think about me bringing in _____?" (e.g. Holmes, Plaxico).

Ryan doesn't deal with cap management; all he can see is the player who's being brought in (not considering how long that person's locked in here until). The immediate cost to him on gameday is bumping the lowest guy. So Braylon Edwards doesn't replace someone valuable; he bumps off Chansi Stuckey. Santonio Holmes doesn't replace Cotchery; he replaces a 5th round pick that has no name or face yet, and he replaces David Clowney. From a head coach's perspective, this helps him on gameday. But like shoving food in his mouth indiscriminately, he says no to nothing. Offer Sanchez an extension? Sure; we don't have anyone any better to replace him with anyway. Never mind that this is your QB next year and, barring injury or GM replacement, the year after that as well.

If you want to blame/credit Rex with having 2% or 88% influence over his roster, it's really besides the point--he did an awful job managing those players once they were here. If you don't think that Rex (or Rex's presence) had any influence in the sea-change in philosophy regarding the type of player that was brought in, and that it was a coincidence that Tannenbaum, CPA, elected to bring every exiled player in the league to the Jets to add to Ryan's swagger collection, that's fine, too. It doesn't change the fact that those players bitch-slapped this franchise under Rex's stewardship. That's on him, unless you think that Tannenbaum was so all-powerful that he was dictating who started at every position every week, despite the fact that all-powerful Tannenbaum was thrown out the door/

He also gets attached to players, which I don't think anyone doubts, to a fault. I think it's a prime reason the Jets brought in Patterson instead of bringing back Cromartie. The CB market is stupidly overpriced right now and so far Idzik (among other things) comes across as very much a bean-counter type who feels the position has a ceiling after which you're overpaying with dollars that would be better-served elsewhere (or spread around). He has 12 draft picks and he's going to take a cornerback. In a perfect world this young kid will play earlier rather than later. But if Ryan is too chummy with Cromartie, and in particular if there's concern about one of the longer-tenured veterans taking a seat for a rookie here & there, then that muddies the situation. He only wants the $3M veteran in for just this year, and it'll be less disruptive to bench Patterson than Cromartie. And it would be somewhat true even if there was a new HC this season. That's what I think a lot of it was, anyway.

This is the Ryan you assume "learned on the job"? That the GM has to intervene in his coach's personal relationships between him and every washed-up veteran that he placated for too long?

I don't at all believe that Tannenbaum was here to lay down his life or career for the whims of a first time head coach who only had experience on one side of the ball. One could maybe make this argument for a GM who was brought in while Ryan was already here (Idzik) but it already seems clear that's not happening.

I think Tannenbaum, cockroach that he was, did what Woody wanted, and I think it's clear the Woody is snowed by Rex, and that Tannenbaum did what Woody wanted.

Ryan got maybe 1 draft pick per season, and that's IF too many picks weren't already used up by trading up or trading them away for veterans.

Go look at that list of all the players brought in on offense over the first 2 years. Clearly more players on offense were brought in to upgrade than were brought in for the defense to upgrade. It is the opposite of the picture you've painted, where Ryan would sacrifice everything for his precious defense. If he's the GM-HC he's not dumping all those resources into the offense while skating by with the likes of Brodney Pool starting in his beloved secondary, let alone Marques Douglas past his prime over an in his prime Kenyon Coleman, so he could start a rookie QB with barely any college experience, let alone pro experience.

I think he's made some ridiculous boneheaded decisions as HC over the years. And I also think he's learned from some of them, and hope he's learned from others. Just as I also think other coaches make boneheaded decisions and learn from them when they blow up in their faces.

What, exactly, has he learned? Literally the only reason you and slats keep banging that drum is because he managed to beat the Browns and Dolphins at the end of the season. Otherwise, the season was a nightmare. Seven losses by double digits, 4 by 20+. They sucked and parity bailed them out at the end.

And in either case, he isn't and wasn't the GM. I do think the new one is stronger than the past one, and a major reason is a belief that he doesn't have to go balls deep in overpriced veterans, or trading up in the draft, to adequately fill a hole. In general, I think he has confidence in his ability to fill positions with draft picks (even if that confidence is misplaced), and I think he has the patience to not panic into making bad, major moves. Some say to a fault, but I prefer that to the former method (so far).

If Rex never said Word One in regards to acquiring a single player on the roster, you'd still have a difficult case arguing that he deserves to keep his job

Edited by T0mShane
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