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Patriots locker room attendant tried to put unapproved ball into AFC final


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Shouldn't you be more concerned about the draft picks the Jets will lose because of Woody's blatant tampering?

It is not cheating.   It is called gaining a competitive advantage, something the Pats do better than any team in the NFL.

Can you let me know which Draft Pick you expect us to lose, so I can update the "Offseason Activity" thread.   Thanks!

You cannot even get this right.  11 of 12 failed.

 

Which is even worse. If all 12 failed the Pats could say they had a faulty process or pressure gauge. But then how did they get one right. No one has asked them that question. That makes them looks even more guilty.

 

Most likely they had one inflated to proper level as the bogey ball that could be readily given to the ref if they ask for one ball to check the pressure during the game or halftime. So it sounds more like a properly pre-planned operation to gain advantage.

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Which is even worse. If all 12 failed the Pats could say they had a faulty process or pressure gauge. But then how did they get one right. No one has asked them that question. That makes them looks even more guilty.

 

Most likely they had one inflated to proper level as the bogey ball that could be readily given to the ref if they ask for one ball to check the pressure during the game or halftime. So it sounds more like a properly pre-planned operation to gain advantage.

What are you talking about? it is the refs that fill or insure that the balls are at 12.5 - 13.5. The teams submit the balls to the refs filled according to how the team likes it (within spec), the refs then check them and add air or remove air to get them within spec. The pats could have submitted 11 balls at 12.5 and one at 12.4, the ref then adds air to  the one underspec ball , who knows maybe he added a pound to that one and made it 13.4.

 

I don't think many of you ever performed a DOE.

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What are you talking about? it is the refs that fill or insure that the balls are at 12.5 - 13.5. The teams submit the balls to the refs filled according to how the team likes it (within spec), the refs then check them and add air or remove air to get them within spec. The pats could have submitted 11 balls at 12.5 and one at 12.4, the ref then adds air to  the one underspec ball , who knows maybe he added a pound to that one and made it 13.4.

 

I don't think many of you ever performed a DOE.

 

You should get some poms poms.

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You should do a little research before you post. After 4 weeks of discussion, here and on tv, you were unaware that the refs are responsible for the balls being in specification.

they are responsible but inspection is 2 to 2 1/2 hours b4 game. Then attendants get balls. refs in game can say "this feels deflated", but there is a window of time b4 game where balls can be altered..

Maybe that will be new rule,,refs inspect 2 hr b4 game and then NFL adds 2 NFL traveling employees that control balls from 2 hr b4 game to all during the game.. maybe new practice will be adopted due to obvious deflation after refs gave OK 2 hours b4 game?

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Actually, it has always been reported as 11 of 12.

Actually, it hasn't:

 

http://www.si.com/nfl/2015/01/29/deflategate-nfl-psi-footballs-dean-blandino

 

After the Patriots defeated the Indianapolis Colts, New England was accused of playing with balls that were inflated below league requirements. Subsequent investigations found that 11 of the Patriots' 12 footballs were, in fact, under-inflated by two pounds of air (psi), based on league regulations, sparking reaction all across the NFL. It was later revealed that the 12th football was also under-inflated, but by less than two psi.

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they are responsible but inspection is 2 to 2 1/2 hours b4 game. Then attendants get balls. refs in game can say "this feels deflated", but there is a window of time b4 game where balls can be altered..

Maybe that will be new rule,,refs inspect 2 hr b4 game and then NFL adds 2 NFL traveling employees that control balls from 2 hr b4 game to all during the game.. maybe new practice will be adopted due to obvious deflation after refs gave OK 2 hours b4 game?

It need s to be tightened up for sure. Look what ESPN put this guy thru only to find out that there was a NFL official that gave him the ball after he stole the first one. The guy Scott Miller was fired by the nfl a month ago for this and espn made it seem like it was this "ball boy" idea. 

 

We don't know when the balls are inspected. They are given the balls 2 hours before game time and they give the balls back the teams 15 min prior to the game but we don't know when in that 1 and 45 min the actual inspection takes place.

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It's obvious the Colts' GM Ryan Grigson masterminded this entire plan to set the Patriots up. There is no way Saint Belichick would ever bend the rules. On the other hand, this sketchy Grigson character, is as conniving as they come. Heck, he's even pretended to be a devout Catholic his entire life just to make his framing Brady and Belichick even more believable! Just read below to see how devious this man is. It's apparent there is no end to his evil ways:

 

At Purdue University in the early 1990s, Ryan Grigson was going down the wrong path. The ways of the world had taken precedence over the ways of the Gospel for the 6-foot-6-inch, 290-pound tight end and offensive tackle.

Yet Grigson received a wake-up call that changed his life. He was almost fatally injured during a game and then spent weeks at the hospital in intensive care. Faced with his own mortality, Grigson became much more open to the fullness of the Gospel.

After being released from the hospital, Grigson eventually took up football again, but with a different mindset. He completed his collegiate career as a captain of the Boilermakers and then played two seasons professionally. Not wanting to leave a game that had been part of his life for many years, he embarked upon an administrative career in professional football.

The Highland, Ind., native worked as a scout with the St. Louis Rams and the Philadelphia Eagles, and in January 2012, he was hired as the general manager of the Indianapolis Colts. The team had posted a 2-14 record in 2011, but under Grigson’s management, they have registered three straight 11-5 seasons and have gotten progressively better in the playoffs.

Two years ago, they lost in the opening round; last year, they lost in the second round; and this year, they are hoping to go even further. In order to do this, however, they have to get past the AFC West-champion Denver Broncos in Denver, something no team has been able to do this season.

As the Colts prepared to take on the Broncos on Jan. 11, Grigson, a 42-year-old father of six, fielded questions from Register correspondent Trent Beattie.

 

You’re facing the AFC West-champion Denver Broncos in Denver on Sunday. What are your thoughts on that game?

It’s obviously going to be a great challenge. They are talent-laden across the board and have Pro Bowlers and even Hall of Famers at key positions. They can beat you in so many different ways that they’re a hard group to account for when game-planning. We will have to play our best football to this point to have a chance in their backyard, and we definitely can’t expect to come out of there with a win if we shoot ourselves in the foot with turnovers, penalties, mental errors, etc. So again, it will have to be an all-hands-on-deck mindset and a true team win to get it done out there.

 

What do you like most about working in the NFL?

The best thing about being in the NFL is competing and working every day for a Super Bowl victory. It’s a great challenge, but it gives me a certain drive and energy to push this organization in every way to try to attain it. No matter how difficult it can get, I love coming to work every day, and I try to keep in mind that there are only 32 of these general-manager jobs in the NFL.

 

Do you come from a devout family?

When I hear the word “devout” I think of my 91-year-old grandmother. She has been a strong example of the old adage that the best Gospel is lived, not preached. As long as I can remember, she has shown me a consistent example of what it means to be a good Catholic: whether it’s seeing her pray the Rosary every single night, never missing Mass, sending prayer cards to people and really just obeying the Golden Rule, but expecting nothing at all in return.

My mom was widowed at a young age, due to my father’s terminal brain cancer. She was left with two young sons to raise, but she never complained. She always had me and my younger brother, Dru [the director of college scouting for the Arizona Cardinals], at Mass, rain or shine.

Lastly, my godmother is someone else who helped to shape my faith throughout my life, with constant encouragement and reminders to stay the course, no matter what. I was basically raised by three strong women who took turns keeping me in line growing up, and, trust me, I wasn’t the easiest kid to raise.

 

Did you get in trouble at school?

I attended Our Lady of Grace School in Highland, Ind., from first through eighth grade. The priests, nuns and other teachers in that school taught me so much and showed me a lot of tough love as I went through some hard times with my family. Everyone responds differently to different types of teaching or coaching, but I definitely needed tough love as a kid, and the clergy and faculty at school gave me plenty of it.

We went to Mass every day, but, as a youngster, you space out and don’t pay attention sometimes. Yet, looking back, I think you still take away something subconsciously, even when you’re just sitting there. You’re hearing the word of God, being in his presence and receiving him in the Eucharist. Those cumulative days at Mass helped to mold my faith at its earliest stages, and I’m extremely grateful for that.

 

You have your own family now. What do you like most about family life?

It might sound kind of ordinary, but, to be honest, just being around my wife, Cynthia, and our six children — Sophia (12), Noah (10), Luke (9), Levi (7), Ava (6) and Jonah (newborn) — is what I like most. No matter the activity, I enjoy being close to all of them. I’m always showering my kids with affection, and I probably annoy some of them at times, but I want to make the most of the moments I have with them. You’ve got to do that when your job has a tendency to take up a lot of your time.

I think marriage, especially in a large family, has its challenges, but you learn so many valuable lessons. As a husband and father, I am constantly exposed in my human weakness, and it gets discouraging because you want to be better for them. Yet God is always there to forgive, strengthen and help to further mold you to get over each hurdle. All the lessons make you that much stronger for the next challenge.

It is such a blessing, but also such a tremendous responsibility, to be a husband and father. The difficult experience with my father’s death has helped me to deeply appreciate what it means to be a father. It’s not something I take for granted.

 

Was there a particularly tough time in your adult life that your faith got you through?

Without a doubt, I would say the toughest time was at Purdue, in 1992, when I got seriously hurt in a football game. The injury [a hit to his abdomen, which resulted in pancreatitis, kidney failure and then pneumonia] almost cost me my life; and then it put me in the hospital for a long time. For a good while, I was on machines in intensive care, and my body was so beat up, but my spirit was willing, so it was a time I feel God used to truly get my attention.

I had been a young kid away from home and slowly going down a wrong path, but during my time in the hospital and afterward, I really had a thirst for Scripture, and I opened up my heart and mind completely to the Good News. I prayed more than ever before and just had a better sense of what it means to be a Christian man.

You hear the expression that there’s faith in foxholes. The hospital stay was kind of the same; because when you’re faced with being that sick, I don’t care who you are, you want to go to heaven and not the other destination. So being in the hospital was a wake-up call for me, and I was certainly changed forever because of it.

Even when the world and my job get the best of me today, it doesn’t take long to remember what I learned in the hospital bed all those weeks: that we are nothing without God, and there is no hope when he is out of the equation. However, no matter the state of your soul or your current state of affairs, if you’re still alive and willing to bring him into the equation, he can make everything right.

 

What are some of your favorite aspects of the Catholic Church?

I love the sacraments, especially the sanctity of the Mass. I have also recently been trying to go to confession more often. I find it healing to speak to someone about faults and missteps. It is humbling, and it isn’t easy to do, especially when it’s face-to-face, but it is cleansing and therapeutic, making it worth the effort. 

I also appreciate the order and the history of our Church. I’ve always marveled at the unbroken succession of popes since St. Peter the Apostle. Whenever the Church has gone through turbulent things in my lifetime, I’ve found solace in the fact that incredible history and deep roots are there.

One aspect of Church history is found in sacred architecture. I’m not opposed to new church buildings, but I am traditional at my core, and I personally like being in some of those beautiful, old churches when I pray. When it comes to places of worship, I want to be in one that looks worthy of housing Christ’s body and his blood.

 

I heard that you have a devotion to Padre Pio. How did that come about?

Like many other saints, I was introduced to Padre Pio by my grandmother. She gave me a book about him when I got married in 2001, which was before he was canonized. The book sat on my shelf for about three years, and, finally, one day, I grabbed it when I was headed out on a scouting trip.

Padre Pio has a long history in my family, it turned out. My great-grandmother actually had a picture of him in her house many, many years ago and knew of all the miracles happening with him over in Italy. Her parish priest actually advised her to take the picture down because I guess the Church hadn’t investigated all the things going on, so there was still some controversy.

I was especially drawn to Padre Pio because of the stigmata. If someone bears the wounds of Christ, I figure he or she is obviously close to him or he chose that person for a special mission. The phenomenon of stigmata is a fascinating topic, and Padre Pio’s whole life is fascinating. He also endeared himself to me for the simple fact that he liked to enjoy cold beers with friends. There was a normalcy and humanness about him, despite his extraordinary life and circumstances.

While I was with the Philadelphia Eagles from 2004 to 2012, our training-camp site was just 20 minutes from the Our Lady of Grace Shrine and Padre Pio Spirituality Centre in Barto, Pa. I would go on pilgrimage there with whoever wanted to come along. This included a great friend and co-worker stricken with brain cancer like my late father. My friend’s cancer has been in remission for eight years now, and he has a strong devotion to St. Pio, still going on pilgrimage every year and placing petitions for me and my family. St. Pio has definitely enriched my faith, and I know that, through his intercession, I’ve had prayers answered.

Ever since I was given a lives-of-the-saints book as a kid, I’ve been fascinated by those holy men and women. In many cases, they were very ordinary people who became extraordinary because they let God fully reign in their hearts and minds. This complete surrender is inspiring, and, while it is certainly a challenge, it is what we are all called to do.

Read more: http://www.ncregister.com/daily-news/indianapolis-colts-gm-speaks-of-playoffs-parenting-and-padre-pio#ixzz3SM7yJrTG

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   I don't care at this point.  Cheaters never prosper but the Patriots do.  And the NFL just wants things

to go along smoothing so it will sanction cheating.  One player uses stickem, a head coach can cheat

and get away with it..... I guess gambling on games and BALCO is too.  The NFL is a machine and

BB could now chop off a cheerleader's head with a chainsaw and get away with it.  The people who

pay attention to this sh*t should do something else with their lives.  And Pats fans, you can all kiss my @ss.

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It's obvious the Colts' GM Ryan Grigson masterminded this entire plan to set the Patriots up. There is no way Saint Belichick would ever bend the rules. On the other hand, this sketchy Grigson character, is as conniving as they come. Heck, he's even pretended to be a devout Catholic his entire life just to make his framing Brady and Belichick even more believable! Just read below to see how devious this man is. It's apparent there is no end to his evil ways:

 

At Purdue University in the early 1990s, Ryan Grigson was going down the wrong path. The ways of the world had taken precedence over the ways of the Gospel for the 6-foot-6-inch, 290-pound tight end and offensive tackle.

Yet Grigson received a wake-up call that changed his life. He was almost fatally injured during a game and then spent weeks at the hospital in intensive care. Faced with his own mortality, Grigson became much more open to the fullness of the Gospel.

After being released from the hospital, Grigson eventually took up football again, but with a different mindset. He completed his collegiate career as a captain of the Boilermakers and then played two seasons professionally. Not wanting to leave a game that had been part of his life for many years, he embarked upon an administrative career in professional football.

The Highland, Ind., native worked as a scout with the St. Louis Rams and the Philadelphia Eagles, and in January 2012, he was hired as the general manager of the Indianapolis Colts. The team had posted a 2-14 record in 2011, but under Grigson’s management, they have registered three straight 11-5 seasons and have gotten progressively better in the playoffs.

Two years ago, they lost in the opening round; last year, they lost in the second round; and this year, they are hoping to go even further. In order to do this, however, they have to get past the AFC West-champion Denver Broncos in Denver, something no team has been able to do this season.

As the Colts prepared to take on the Broncos on Jan. 11, Grigson, a 42-year-old father of six, fielded questions from Register correspondent Trent Beattie.

 

You’re facing the AFC West-champion Denver Broncos in Denver on Sunday. What are your thoughts on that game?

It’s obviously going to be a great challenge. They are talent-laden across the board and have Pro Bowlers and even Hall of Famers at key positions. They can beat you in so many different ways that they’re a hard group to account for when game-planning. We will have to play our best football to this point to have a chance in their backyard, and we definitely can’t expect to come out of there with a win if we shoot ourselves in the foot with turnovers, penalties, mental errors, etc. So again, it will have to be an all-hands-on-deck mindset and a true team win to get it done out there.

 

What do you like most about working in the NFL?

The best thing about being in the NFL is competing and working every day for a Super Bowl victory. It’s a great challenge, but it gives me a certain drive and energy to push this organization in every way to try to attain it. No matter how difficult it can get, I love coming to work every day, and I try to keep in mind that there are only 32 of these general-manager jobs in the NFL.

 

Do you come from a devout family?

When I hear the word “devout” I think of my 91-year-old grandmother. She has been a strong example of the old adage that the best Gospel is lived, not preached. As long as I can remember, she has shown me a consistent example of what it means to be a good Catholic: whether it’s seeing her pray the Rosary every single night, never missing Mass, sending prayer cards to people and really just obeying the Golden Rule, but expecting nothing at all in return.

My mom was widowed at a young age, due to my father’s terminal brain cancer. She was left with two young sons to raise, but she never complained. She always had me and my younger brother, Dru [the director of college scouting for the Arizona Cardinals], at Mass, rain or shine.

Lastly, my godmother is someone else who helped to shape my faith throughout my life, with constant encouragement and reminders to stay the course, no matter what. I was basically raised by three strong women who took turns keeping me in line growing up, and, trust me, I wasn’t the easiest kid to raise.

 

Did you get in trouble at school?

I attended Our Lady of Grace School in Highland, Ind., from first through eighth grade. The priests, nuns and other teachers in that school taught me so much and showed me a lot of tough love as I went through some hard times with my family. Everyone responds differently to different types of teaching or coaching, but I definitely needed tough love as a kid, and the clergy and faculty at school gave me plenty of it.

We went to Mass every day, but, as a youngster, you space out and don’t pay attention sometimes. Yet, looking back, I think you still take away something subconsciously, even when you’re just sitting there. You’re hearing the word of God, being in his presence and receiving him in the Eucharist. Those cumulative days at Mass helped to mold my faith at its earliest stages, and I’m extremely grateful for that.

 

You have your own family now. What do you like most about family life?

It might sound kind of ordinary, but, to be honest, just being around my wife, Cynthia, and our six children — Sophia (12), Noah (10), Luke (9), Levi (7), Ava (6) and Jonah (newborn) — is what I like most. No matter the activity, I enjoy being close to all of them. I’m always showering my kids with affection, and I probably annoy some of them at times, but I want to make the most of the moments I have with them. You’ve got to do that when your job has a tendency to take up a lot of your time.

I think marriage, especially in a large family, has its challenges, but you learn so many valuable lessons. As a husband and father, I am constantly exposed in my human weakness, and it gets discouraging because you want to be better for them. Yet God is always there to forgive, strengthen and help to further mold you to get over each hurdle. All the lessons make you that much stronger for the next challenge.

It is such a blessing, but also such a tremendous responsibility, to be a husband and father. The difficult experience with my father’s death has helped me to deeply appreciate what it means to be a father. It’s not something I take for granted.

 

Was there a particularly tough time in your adult life that your faith got you through?

Without a doubt, I would say the toughest time was at Purdue, in 1992, when I got seriously hurt in a football game. The injury [a hit to his abdomen, which resulted in pancreatitis, kidney failure and then pneumonia] almost cost me my life; and then it put me in the hospital for a long time. For a good while, I was on machines in intensive care, and my body was so beat up, but my spirit was willing, so it was a time I feel God used to truly get my attention.

I had been a young kid away from home and slowly going down a wrong path, but during my time in the hospital and afterward, I really had a thirst for Scripture, and I opened up my heart and mind completely to the Good News. I prayed more than ever before and just had a better sense of what it means to be a Christian man.

You hear the expression that there’s faith in foxholes. The hospital stay was kind of the same; because when you’re faced with being that sick, I don’t care who you are, you want to go to heaven and not the other destination. So being in the hospital was a wake-up call for me, and I was certainly changed forever because of it.

Even when the world and my job get the best of me today, it doesn’t take long to remember what I learned in the hospital bed all those weeks: that we are nothing without God, and there is no hope when he is out of the equation. However, no matter the state of your soul or your current state of affairs, if you’re still alive and willing to bring him into the equation, he can make everything right.

 

What are some of your favorite aspects of the Catholic Church?

I love the sacraments, especially the sanctity of the Mass. I have also recently been trying to go to confession more often. I find it healing to speak to someone about faults and missteps. It is humbling, and it isn’t easy to do, especially when it’s face-to-face, but it is cleansing and therapeutic, making it worth the effort. 

I also appreciate the order and the history of our Church. I’ve always marveled at the unbroken succession of popes since St. Peter the Apostle. Whenever the Church has gone through turbulent things in my lifetime, I’ve found solace in the fact that incredible history and deep roots are there.

One aspect of Church history is found in sacred architecture. I’m not opposed to new church buildings, but I am traditional at my core, and I personally like being in some of those beautiful, old churches when I pray. When it comes to places of worship, I want to be in one that looks worthy of housing Christ’s body and his blood.

 

I heard that you have a devotion to Padre Pio. How did that come about?

Like many other saints, I was introduced to Padre Pio by my grandmother. She gave me a book about him when I got married in 2001, which was before he was canonized. The book sat on my shelf for about three years, and, finally, one day, I grabbed it when I was headed out on a scouting trip.

Padre Pio has a long history in my family, it turned out. My great-grandmother actually had a picture of him in her house many, many years ago and knew of all the miracles happening with him over in Italy. Her parish priest actually advised her to take the picture down because I guess the Church hadn’t investigated all the things going on, so there was still some controversy.

I was especially drawn to Padre Pio because of the stigmata. If someone bears the wounds of Christ, I figure he or she is obviously close to him or he chose that person for a special mission. The phenomenon of stigmata is a fascinating topic, and Padre Pio’s whole life is fascinating. He also endeared himself to me for the simple fact that he liked to enjoy cold beers with friends. There was a normalcy and humanness about him, despite his extraordinary life and circumstances.

While I was with the Philadelphia Eagles from 2004 to 2012, our training-camp site was just 20 minutes from the Our Lady of Grace Shrine and Padre Pio Spirituality Centre in Barto, Pa. I would go on pilgrimage there with whoever wanted to come along. This included a great friend and co-worker stricken with brain cancer like my late father. My friend’s cancer has been in remission for eight years now, and he has a strong devotion to St. Pio, still going on pilgrimage every year and placing petitions for me and my family. St. Pio has definitely enriched my faith, and I know that, through his intercession, I’ve had prayers answered.

Ever since I was given a lives-of-the-saints book as a kid, I’ve been fascinated by those holy men and women. In many cases, they were very ordinary people who became extraordinary because they let God fully reign in their hearts and minds. This complete surrender is inspiring, and, while it is certainly a challenge, it is what we are all called to do.

Read more: http://www.ncregister.com/daily-news/indianapolis-colts-gm-speaks-of-playoffs-parenting-and-padre-pio#ixzz3SM7yJrTG

And I go to mass myself, it certainly does not make me less of a sinner just more aware of the sinner I am.

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Nothing will happen to NE , because they retain Roger Goodell on their payroll

 

   And he costs plenty.

 

   Whats worse is all the lobsters and clam chowder FedEx delivers to his Mansion every weekend. Its like Steinbrenner and the Calzones. Boston has some great Italian but Goodell wont hear of it.

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And I go to mass myself, it certainly does not make me less of a sinner just more aware of the sinner I am.

Did you notice all his boys are named after men in the Old Testament? It's safe to say he takes his faith a little more seriously than just going to Mass on Sundays. From everything I could find on the internet, he seems to be a very moral guy. I would hope even the biggest Patriot homer fans would concede he's cleaner than Belichick.

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Did you notice all his boys are named after men in the Old Testament? It's safe to say he takes his faith a little more seriously than going to Mass on Sundays. From everything I could find on the internet, he seems to be a very moral guy. I would hope even the biggest Patriot homer fans would concede he's cleaner than Belichick.

 

Patriot fans won't concede Joan of Arc was cleaner than Belichick.

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It's becoming more and more difficult to take the game seriously... 

 

between cheating, drastic rule changes, PSL's and the many greedy money grabs this league has taken...the popularity will begin to decline and their lack of integrity and greed will eventually cost them the league.  

 

I, for one, am just about done.  

 

I solved this problem by turning off my radio and tv between games.  Sometimes, I even avoid fan forums.  The games are as good as they have ever been.  Parity is as good as in any sport.  The media, on the other hand, is not.  

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*Patman has more posts in this thread then half the posters have total, love how the loyal Patties rush to New England's defence at a moments notice. You really are the minute men.

OK, feel free to bash, look at all the jet fans rushing to judgement on McNally in this thread and to find out that he was given the ball by an nfl official after that guy stole the original ball and who got fired soon after the game. 

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Did you notice all his boys are named after men in the Old Testament? It's safe to say he takes his faith a little more seriously than just going to Mass on Sundays. From everything I could find on the internet, he seems to be a very moral guy. I would hope even the biggest Patriot homer fans would concede he's cleaner than Belichick.

 

I don't think we know enough about either guy to judge their morality.  There are some priests who have demonstrated piety who have lived incompatible lives.  

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I don't think we know enough about either guy to judge their morality.  There are some priests who have demonstrated piety who have lived incompatible lives.  

But that fact hasn't stopped the Patriot fans from accusing Grigson of being the one behind the Colts deflating the footballs. Also, there's enough information out there about Belichick to conclude he's amoral.

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Banging him hard too. At least that's what I heard. She was quoted as saying "Leo will always be my 1 true love, no one will ever give it to me as good"

I wouldn't be shocked if Decap was the father of her 2 kids....Brady's sperm probably moves as slow as his combine 40x

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I've heard it all now! Pats fans cant be serious with these accusations that the colts/Grigson had an alterior motive with the deflated football scandle! I lose more respect for you pats fan with every post.

The Boston media is very serious about it, even though it isn't consistent with anything officially released regarding Deflategate.

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Again, you are talking about millionaire players who don't carry their own luggage and they are going to put a lock on the thermostat to save 50 bucks in heat for Sunday. Even Charley Finley from the As who charged his players for soda would not do that. These guys probably have guys that wipe down the machines after them for the next guy to use after they work out.

And why is Green Eliis still playing if he is putting the ball on the ground. He would not be playing in NE putting the ball on the ground. And tell me how do you assign a numerical value to a human performance in different circumstances different locations, different run options, different blockers, injury, it cannot be done and no scientist working at columbia would sign his name to it for any reason other than in abstract.

Lol excellent point

BJGE is exhibit A why Brady deflating the ball was a significant cheat. Guy never fumbles in New England he goes to the bengals and develops worse hands than mark Sanchez.

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