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do the jets actually rank among the NFL's worst-drafting teams ? ? ?


kelly
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He went to the Texans in the Glenn,Coleman salary dump in 2002..

 

He did, but I think he was out of the league 2-3 years after that.

 

edit: Just looked...played two seasons after leaving the Jets and was done.  Starting to recall some back issues?

Edited by AirForceJetFan
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You miss on a receiver, lineman, dback in the first round, you can recover. You miss on a QB,it sets you back7-10 years. That's why, for my $, the Sanchez pick at #5 in 2009 was the worst Jet 1st round pick ever. He we are 7 years later, running in place, as the NFL continues to pass us by. No pun intended.

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You miss on a receiver, lineman, dback in the first round, you can recover. You miss on a QB,it sets you back7-10 years. That's why, for my $, the Sanchez pick at #5 in 2009 was the worst Jet 1st round pick ever. He we are 7 years later, running in place, as the NFL continues to pass us by.

Rex and the crew loved him!

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Best was probably Jason Ferguson in 6th or 7th.

 

Leon Johnson, Coles, Farrior, D Ward were good picks

Well Leon had both a punt and kickoff return in 1997 and ran well until he got hurt in 1998 and was done.. Coles absolutely and Ward was ok.. Farrior did his best work for Pitt..

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You miss on a receiver, lineman, dback in the first round, you can recover. You miss on a QB,it sets you back7-10 years. That's why, for my $, the Sanchez pick at #5 in 2009 was the worst Jet 1st round pick ever. He we are 7 years later, running in place, as the NFL continues to pass us by. No pun intended.

Not with the new CBA with the rookie salary change..

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Not with the new CBA with the rookie salary change..

 

I agree with you, that does help soften the blow somewhat. But, bigger picture, you draft a QB in the first round, you are basically saying he's your future. Even if he sits 1 or 2 years, then starts and 3 years later bombs, you are back to square one.Missing on a QB in first is suicide for a franchise.

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I agree with you, that does help soften the blow somewhat. But, bigger picture, you draft a QB in the first round, you are basically saying he's your future. Even if he sits 1 or 2 years, then starts and 3 years later bombs, you are back to square one.Missing on a QB in first is suicide for a franchise.

And then you have 1st rd picks like Eason or Bledsoe that get to a Bowl and lose but luck out and win 4 Bowls with your 2nd 6th rd pick..LOL

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Scott Frost was a QB in college as a matter of fact Frost led Nebraska to the 1997 National Championship with a 42-17 Orange Bowl win over Peyton Manning's Tennessee Volunteers..

He also beat up Laurence Phillips in a dispute over a women while at Nebraska, but taking a QB in the 3rd round and trying to convert him to a safety was one of the more bizarre Jets draft picks ever... and that is saying something.  Apparently Darth Belichick hated this move more than anyone in the building.

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We have had our fair share of busts and terrible picks over the years, but we've also had our share of hits as well. Every team has bad picks, reaches, busts.

What makes it more glaring is we haven't hit on a QB. When you have Brady you can blow picks on trading up for Chad Jackson instead of sitting where you originally were and take Greg Jennings. When you don't have Brady, drafting Stephen Hill over Alshon Jeffery hurts a lot more and sticks out more too.

Sent from my SGH-M919 using Tapatalk

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dewayne robertson instead of terrell suggs or troy polamalu..

:wild:

It's getting beat by the Texans for Johnson that stung about 2003. The Jets tried but failed big there. In hindsight and moving past that, yeah, shoulda went with the freak 20 year old pass rusher with almost 40 sacks in the Pac-10. He did bomb the draft process and the Jets thought they had three good, young DEs.
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The main reason we suck at drafting is, we can't and have not Drafted a franchise QB since Broadway Joe.

Look at the other AFCE Teams QB's including Ex AFCE teams like the Colts:-

New England, Tom Brady (enough said).

Miami, Dan Marino.

Buffalo Jim Kelly

Indianapolis Payton Manning, Andrew Luck.

I keep waiting thinking when's it's our turn, It won't matter if the QB was middle if the road, but we had bottom five QB play now for years.

This is why we suck at drafting! - the most important player in an NFL team is the QB and we just can't draft one.

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Everything the jets do is severely overblown by fans and media alike.

Just wait until this years draft. All we've heard is the jets can go any direction or best player availible. But come draft day. Jets fans will boo the pick no matter what because it's not the guy they think is best for the team.

It would appear Idzik did awful when Sheldon Richsrdson was picked. Because this forum and draft gurus on ESPN crushed us for the pick. Well he's a pro bowler only 2 years later. So the perception isn't always true for the jets fans in the moment it happens.

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The perception of the Jets as a horrible drafting team comes from two sources - the obnoxious douches at ESPN and our whiny bitch fanbase. 

 

the fan base fuel the material for espn booing every 1st rd pick ..  good thing its in chicago this year

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It's tough finding that franchise QB. A lot of it is just luck, such as being the worst team in the right year. If we go 1-15 in 97 instead of 96, then we take Peyton. I know Archie asked Parcells to guarantee he'd take him before making the decision if he would leave after his junior season, but I think Peyton wanted to stay for his senior season regardless.

The year we had the top pick it was Keyshawn then Orlando Pace (when we traded back for Farrior), if a Peyton or Luck was the concensus top pick that year they'd of been Jets instead. Picking O'Brien over Marino is one instance where they plain out just F'd up.

I know you have your occasional mid round guy like a Russell Wilson, or the rare exception like Brady, but more often that not you find your guy in the top 10-15 spots in the draft.

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One thing people never talk about is the actual development of players. They tend to look at the end results and not at how they got there.

There are teams that seem to draft high every year but still suck. Could they be that off on every pick or are they just really bad at developing players?

The NY Islanders until recently come to mind.

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But alot of people had Junior Seau or Cortez Kennedy ahead of him. :wild:

While both would have been much better picks in hindsight, it's unfair to kill the Jets for picking Thomas, he was considered a blue chipper.  Feel free to kill them for drafting O'Brien over Marino, or for taking Lageman over Louis Oliver among many others.

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Parcells had several drafts that would make Idzik look like Ozzie Newsome.

 

 

re : parcells 

 

parcells the COACH.. Luv him !...parcells the GM.... not so much     :fighting0093:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cheers ~ ~

:cheer:

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On Manning, I think Parcells did not want to babysit a qb. He knew his time was short, and did not want to fill that time wet nursing a baby qb.

And as he did throughout his career he chose what was best for Parcells rather than for the team he was coaching. 

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Dude, I am writing a BOOK on the Jets draft history and it is called CLUELESS. I have the Jets ENTIRE draft history on a database and it does not reflect a competent draft history. In 1967 the Jets drafted Paul Seiler as the first round pick instead of Alan Page, Gene Upshaw, Lem Barney and Willie Lanier. In '68 it was Curley Culp, Elvin Bethea and Art Shell. I could go on and on including Vick, and Carl Barzolauskas in 1974 when Lynn Swann, Dave Casper and Jack Lambert were available.

Steelers and Raiders knew how to draft in those days. Steelers are one of the best drafting teams ever. Raiders? Al Davis's senility didn't help.

 

Just looked up the Steelers in the 70's re number of HOF'ers drafted. Amazing run:

 

 

1974 1 21 21 Lynn Swann Steelers WR USC 2001

1974 2 20 46 Jack Lambert Steelers LB Kent State 1990

1974 4 4 82 John Stallworth Steelers WR Alabama A&M 2002

1974 5 21 125 Mike Webster Steelers C Wisconsin 1997

1972 1 13 13 Franco Harris Steelers RB Penn State 1990

1971 2 8 34 Jack Ham Steelers LB Penn State 1988

1970 1 1 1 Terry Bradshaw Steelers QB Louisiana Tech 1989

1970 3 1 53 Mel Blount Steelers DB Southern 1989

1969 1 4 4 Joe Greene Steelers DT North Texas State 1987

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saw this..

 

~ ~   Ranking Recent Jets First Round Picks

 

 

Yesterday I wrote a post listing Jets first round picks over the past decade. It belatedly dawned on me that ranking the picks from the past decade would make for nice discussion. With that in mind, here are my rankings for Jets first round picks over the past ten years. Keep in mind that some of the players early in their careers have the potential to move on this list. This is only judging their contributions to date.

 

1. Darrelle Revis, 2007

Revis is the best Jet in a very long time. He is on a Hall of Fame career trajectory. Early in his career, he blossomed into the top cornerback in the NFL. The Jets built successful defenses around his immense talent. The ability to eliminate elite receivers with one quarterback allowed Rex Ryan a ton of flexibility with his defensive calls. Even though other factors were at play, the biggest difference in the immense dropoff of the Jets pass defense in recent years was Revis' departure. It's nice to have him back.

 

2. Nick Mangold, 2006

Mangold has been a starter from day one. Since he entered the league, he has either been the top center or in the discussion. He has also been very durable. Nick has twice as many Pro Bowl teams (6) as missed starts (3).

 

3. Muhammad Wilkerson, 2011

Despite his 10 sacks in 2013, Wilkerson's role doesn't lend itself to gaudy stats. A lot of his value comes from doing the dirty work, eating up blockers, and redirecting ball carriers. Mo is a rare talent, though. There aren't many players in the NFL who can regularly win assignments lining up everywhere from over the ball to outside in a 4-3 look. His versatility is not pleasant for other teams trying to figure out how to stop a player who regularly wins his assignments.

 

4. D'Brickashaw Ferguson, 2006

He isn't flashy, and he never reached the heights of Joe Thomas and Jake Long, the first tackles off the board in the two years after the Jets took Brick. I think the selection of Ferguson in 2006 was a very successful one, though. He has started every game for nine years. At his peak, he was one of the top five or ten tackles in the league. Seldom has left tackle ever felt like a giant weakness since he arrived with the Jets.

 

5. Sheldon Richardson, 2013

Richardson has the most room to grow on the list. It wouldn't be surprising if he made it up to number two on a rating of these players one day. He's an incredible athlete with a nonstop motor.

 

6. Dustin Keller, 2008

Keller was an adequate player, but he was kind of a disappointment. The Jets likely knew they were getting a pure receiving tight end when they moved back into the first round of the 2008 Draft to take Dustin. He wasn't a liability as a receiver. It just always felt like the whole was less than the sum of the parts with him. He had great athletic ability, but he seldom asserted his will. He didn't make the tough catches. He wasn't dynamic after the catch. He wasn't a red zone factor. Even his 65 catch, 815 yard 2011 season felt like it had a lot of empty calories in it. Given how little he provided as a blocker, Dustin needed to become a top end receiver at his position. It did not happen. Sadly, Keller's career is probably over after a devastating knee injury in the 2013 preseason.

 

7. Quinton Coples, 2012

When the Jets took Sheldon Richardson, Coples was left without a spot. The team tried to make him into an edge rusher. Coples hasn't been a disaster there, but he hasn't been an impact guy either. He's a brute strength player, not the kind of explosive athlete you usually see on the edge.

 

8. Mark Sanchez, 2009

I am basing my rating purely on what these players provided the Jets. If we were going based on positive or negative impact, Sanchez might rate last. In many ways the team still has not recovered from Mark's failure to become the long-term answer at quarterback and the domino effect that created. Sanchez was never that good with the Jets. Early in his career he just provided enough flashes of promise to make many of us believe. It didn't hurt that he played his best ball at the end of the year those first two seasons, seemingly putting things together and making the next step when the stakes were biggest. Even halfway through his third year, it was easy to argue he was on the right track. Things fell apart at the end of that season, and they continued through the end of his Jets tenure.

 

9. Calvin Pryor, 2014

Pryor makes it this high because he is only one year into his career. He has talent and time to grow. His rookie year was rough, though. The Jets were hoping for an impact safety. Pryor didn't make impact plays. Worse, he was frequently missing an assignment as the deep guy that turned bad plays into catastrophic plays.

 

10. Kyle Wilson, 2010

When Wilson fell to the end of the first round in 2010, Jets fans had dreams of Revis locking down one half of the field and Revis the other for a long time. Kyle never became more than a depth player, though, due to his extreme lack of ball skills.

 

11. Dee Milliner, 2013

It isn't over for Milliner. He still has a chance to turn things around. It is difficult to imagine a more catastrophic start to his career, though. As a rookie, he was one of the least effective cornerbacks in football. Teams made a point to go after him to much success. He barely got on the field his second year due to multiple serious injuries.

 

12. Vernon Gholston, 2008

Gholston isn't just a bust in Jets lore. He is one of the biggest busts in NFL history. It is almost unfathomable that he did not record one sack in three seasons. Just by pure luck, one would think another defensive lineman would have at some point forced a quarterback to scramble right to Gholston. It isn't like Gholston was purely a product of the Combine either. He was the Big Ten Defensive Lineman of the Year his final season at Ohio State. He even beat Jake Long for a sack.

 

> http://www.ganggreennation.com/2015/4/14/8407445/ranking-recent-jets-first-round-picks

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saw this...

 

 

~ ~ Rome wasn't built in a day, but the New York Jets were rebuilt in one.

 

In 2000, the Jets got younger and better with a historic draft that included an unprecedented four first-round picks -- defensive end Shaun Ellis, pass-rusher John Abraham, quarterback Chad Pennington and tight end Anthony Becht. They picked wide receiver Laveranues Coles in the third round, completing a remarkable haul that fueled the franchise for the better part of a decade.

 

That watershed draft wrapped up 15 years ago today. Take a bow, Bill Parcells.The New York Jets' 2000 draft, led by Bill Parcells, left, included four first-round picks. Parcells, retired from coaching at the time (lol), called the shots from his general-manager chair. He knew he wasn't going to stick around for the long term, so his goal was to leave plenty of parting gifts for his successor, Al Groh, who wound up departing after a year. But that's another story.

 

How did they get four picks ? 

 

 A quick refresher :

 

They received the 16th pick from the New England Patriots as compensation for Bill Belichick. On the eve of the draft, Parcells sent that pick to the San Francisco 49ers, moving up to the 12th spot. I didn't know it at the time, but he was trying to get into position to draft wide receiver Plaxico Burress. A neat sidebar: He spoke directly with 49ers' executive Bill Walsh, a Hall of Famer negotiating with a future Hall of Famer -- a heavyweight phone conversation.

 

The really big move occurred a few days earlier, when the Jets traded disgruntled wide receiver Keyshawn Johnson to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers for the 13th and 27th picks -- a highly controversial deal. Parcells took a lot of heat for that one. This was the Darrelle Revis trade of that era.I remember talking to Groh before the draft, trying to pump him for information on how they would use the picks. Groh, a former New York Giants assistant, tried to be funny, saying he'd like to draft the next Lawrence Taylor, Leonard Marshall and Mark Bavaro. In a total coincidence (or was it?), they ended up picking players at the corresponding positions -- Abraham, Ellis and Becht, respectively. To this day, I wonder if Groh's remark was random or a tip cloaked in what seemed like an absurd analogy at the time.

 

You know how the day turned out: They picked Ellis and Abraham with the 12th and 13th picks, respectively; they selected Pennington with their own pick, 18th; and they grabbed Becht at 27. Believe it not, the morning-after storyline focused on how the Jets failed to adequately replace Johnson. Sure, they took Coles in the third, but no one outside the organization expected him to amount to anything. After all, he was thrown off his college team and deemed a high-risk pick.We were wrong. Aside from Burress, Coles turned out to be the best receiver in the draft.

 

A week or two after the draft, Parcells was talking about the draft to a few reporters at a celebrity golf tournament. I can't remember the exact words (he didn't want to be quoted in the next day's papers), but this was pretty close to what he said: He said it would go down as one of the greatest drafts in history.No, it won't be remembered as one of the greatest, but it was remarkable in that those five players enjoyed long, productive careers. They played a combined total of 59 years, making eight Pro Bowls along the way. Each one played at least 10 seasons, an Iron-Man accomplishment in this blood sport we call football.

 

From a team perspective, they helped the Jets to playoff seasons in 2001, 2002, 2004 and 2006. Ellis stuck around the longest (he was replaced by Muhammad Wilkerson in 2011) and, incredibly, Abraham played until last year, finishing with the Arizona Cardinals and 133.5 sacks.Yes, the Jets will forever be mocked for their long list of draft busts, but on one particular day 15 years ago, they crushed it.

 

> http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york-jets/post/_/id/50647/looking-back-at-the-historic-draft-that-changed-the-jets

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this too...

 

~ ~ Recalling the fascinating 2000 NFL Draft

 

It was the draft where collegiate teammates were selected first and second overall, the draft where the first kicker was taken before the first quarterback.The draft where the best player was taken in Round Six.Yes, it was the 2000 NFL Draft, which kicked off 15 years ago Wednesday in New York.

 

Here are some of memorable occurrences from this dial-up era draft :

  • The top two picks — defensive Courtney Brown (Cleveland) and linebacker LaVar Arrington (Washington) — played together on the same defense at Penn State. However, injuries limited both players from having long careers. Arrington had the better NFL run, making three Pro Bowls, but he was gone from the game by 2007.
  •  
  • Past trades left a few clubs sitting pretty in Round One. Here are three examples. One, Washington selected Arrington with a pick New Orleans dealt for Ricky Williams in 1998. Two, the Ravens took tailback Jamal Lewis at No. 5 — a pick that Atlanta dealt the previous in the previous draft for a second-round choice. Finally, the  :character0181: Jets  :character0181: took edge rusher John Abraham at No. 13 — a selection that once belonged to San Diego. However, the Chargers traded the pick for a second-round selection in 1998.
  •  
  • It’s here we pause to say that trading a future No. 1 pick for a current No. 2 pick is generally not advisable.
  •  
  • Washington held the No. 2 and No. 3 overall picks. After taking Arrington, Washington selected left tackle Chris Samuels, who made six Pro Bowls and spent his entire 10-season career with the club. Washington acquired the No. 3 pick by trading picks Nos. 12 and 24 to San Francisco.
  •  
  • The  :character0181:  Jets had four No. 1 picks  :character0181:   — and did well with all of them, selecting defensive lineman Shaun Ellis 12th, Abraham 13th, quarterback Chad Pennington 18th and tight end Anthony Becht 27th.
  •  
  • Pennington was the first quarterback off the board and the only passer selected in the first two rounds. He was taken one spot after the Raiders selected placekicker Sebastian Janikowski. The Raiders also took the first punter (Shane Lechler, Round Five). Both specialists are still in the league.
  •  
  • The 16th pick belonged to the Patriots, but it went to the Jets as compensation to sign Bill Belichick. The Jets ultimately traded the selection to the 49ers to move up for Ellis (No. 12). At No. 16, the Niners took outside linebacker Julian Peterson, a five-time Pro Bowler.
  •  
  • Fun fact: the Saints gave up a seventh-round pick to hire then-Kansas City assistant Ron Zook as their special teams coach.
  •  
  • How’s this for old school? Five tailbacks were selected in Round One, including three in the first 11 picks: Lewis, Thomas Jones (Arizona, No. 7), Ron Dayne (N.Y. Giants, No. 11). The others were Shaun Alexander (No. 19, Seattle) and Trung Candiate (No. 31, St. Louis).
  •  
  • How’s this for new school? At No. 9, the Bears selected linebacker Brian Urlacher, whose rare speed and athleticism made him ideally suited for the 21st-century game.
  •  
  • Ultimately, though, the 2000 draft will be remembered for quarterback  :blowup: Tom Brady lasting until pick No. 199. He was the seventh of 10 Patriots draft picks and the second of the club’s choices in Round Six. Twelve selections before taking Brady, the Patriots took reserve defensive back Antwan Harris, who played in 52 regular season games and was a key contributor in New England’s Super Bowl XXXVI run, including when he scored on a blocked field goal in the AFC title game.

> http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2015/04/15/recalling-the-fascinating-2000-nfl-draft/

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