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The one thing we should do well is Draft...right?


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looking forward to this years draft with obviously high hopes, but also curious what the consensus will be if we pick Gurley at 6, or make another off the wall move. This is Mac's specialty...you'd have to go with it no matter what they do right?

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I would be ecstatic if we get our hands on Gurley. It fills a need with a player who has the potential of being a game changer. Yes this is a deep RB draft, it is also a deep WR draft yet lots of people would love Cooper.

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The worst drafts this team has had in the nearly 30 years I've been a fan were run by Bill Parcells.  I don't know what the hell to expect from any of these guys.

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If this is Mac's specialty, who I would assume helped find UDFA Arian Foster, that he wouldnt take a RB coming off an ACL who's known to get banged up and often winded in the top 10.

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I'd love Gurley, but not at 6. Hopefully Cooper falls to us at 6, and by some miracle Gurley falls to our 2nd round pick (or we trade up 5-10 spots to get him) adding premiere young talent to the offense....that would be hitting a home run in my book!

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looking forward to this years draft with obviously high hopes, but also curious what the consensus will be if we pick Gurley at 6, or make another off the wall move. This is Mac's specialty...you'd have to go with it no matter what they do right?

 

No.  Internet and Billboards make us powerful.   

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I would be ecstatic if we get our hands on Gurley. It fills a need with a player who has the potential of being a game changer. Yes this is a deep RB draft, it is also a deep WR draft yet lots of people would love Cooper.

THANK YOU!!!! Gurley now that he is ahead of schedule in his recovery is considered by MANY to be a top 3 talent in this draft.  If he played any other position, we wouldn't even be having this discussion.  Everyone wants Cooper and this draft is deeper at receiver than it is at running back (or just as deep).   We already have two pro bowl quality receivers in Marshall and Decker but just slightly above average running backs.  I would prefer the edge rusher personally but I could totally understand taking Gurley at 6.  I can guarantee he will have a bigger impact this year than any receiver we draft including Cooper.   The fact he can also catch out of the backfield is another plus.  

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If you use a top ten pick on a runningback coming off an ACL tear, you deserve to lose your job.

Even if you did your home work and doctors determined he is now 100% healthy?  This is 2015; those injuries are not nearly as serious as they once were and recovery is much quicker.

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I like Gurley too, but not at 6... Yes, he's a top 10 talent but given the devaluation of the RB position he will be taken outside of the top 10... possibly even top 20. I'd be happy with him if we trade back, but not at 6 with other top tier talents that will still be on the board.

Edited by NYJetsVets91
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I'd love Gurley, but not at 6. Hopefully Cooper falls to us at 6, and by some miracle Gurley falls to our 2nd round pick (or we trade up 5-10 spots to get him) adding premiere young talent to the offense....that would be hitting a home run in my book!

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 Gurley is probably going top 10 or 15.  Why Cooper and Not Gurley?  The both players are top 10 talents; who do you think will have a greater impact on our offense?

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I guess I'm in the minority but I'd love to have Gurley even at 6

Make that two of us.  I mean I would prefer the edge rusher, but Gurley at 6 is not a reach. 

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I'd love Gurley, but not at 6. Hopefully Cooper falls to us at 6, and by some miracle Gurley falls to our 2nd round pick (or we trade up 5-10 spots to get him) adding premiere young talent to the offense....that would be hitting a home run in my book!

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To take a RB coming off a serious injury, yeah I would trade down to 12 or so to make that move. All indications are that he will be fine, but fine to a RB means about a four or five year productivity whereas a WR can go eight to 10 years, providing he doesn't get hurt. RB have been devalued for a reason and that is that GM are finally realizing Mel Kiper's "value system" has merit. he may have never made a pick for an NFL team, but I think he could. Gurley no sooner than 12 or it is a mistake and not good value.

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Make that two of us.  I mean I would prefer the edge rusher, but Gurley at 6 is not a reach. 

Not a reach but NOT good value. A RB's career is 4-5 years, with maybe two of those being "premium years" then they go downhill quickly. If the Jets were a RB away from the SB then it would be great value because they would win a ring, but at six for a guy coming off a serious injury is way too risky. A trade down to 12-19 would be where I would take him. Jets may not get much out of Gurley year one because he will be behind in conditioning and practice time, plus he would have to learn RB in the NFL which means route running and blocking assignments.

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Gurley is probably going top 10 or 15. Why Cooper and Not Gurley? The both players are top 10 talents; who do you think will have a greater impact on our offense?

I just think Cooper will have a longer, more productive career and he plays a position harder to fill than Gurley. I'd love Gurley in the 2nd, but I guess that's a pipe dream, oh well.

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http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2025585-have-we-seen-the-last-of-the-first-round-running-back-in-the-nfl-draft

 

 

 
 
 

 

Have We Seen the Last of the 1st-Round Running Backs in the NFL Draft? By Greg Gabriel , Correspondent

 

Apr 11, 2014

 

 

This offseason, the numbers dropped even more. Pierre Thomas of the Saints signed a two-year extension with $4 million in new money, and Knowshon Moreno got a one-year deal from Miami for $3 million total.

Chris Johnson, who was recently cut by Tennessee, has yet to receive an offer from any team (or at least any reported offer). Clubs just aren't going to pay premium money to players who, in all probability, won't be around very long. It's not good business.

Quarterbacks, receivers and linemen are the offensive players who get money. With the style of offense being played in the NFL today, this trend will continue until we see a very special running back come out of the college ranks.

 

 

Just as running backs have dropped down the value board, so too have their contract numbers.

 

The last big running back contracts were signed two years ago when Ray Rice, Forte and Foster all cashed in. Rice's deal was for five years and $35 million. Forte signed a four-year, $30.4 million deal, and Foster's new contract was for five years and $43.5 million.

In 2013, contracts for running backs dropped significantly. Reggie Bush signed a four-year deal worth $16 million, and Steven Jackson's deal in Atlanta was for three years and $12 million.

 

Many of the first-round backs in that same time frame have been very average. Players like Felix Jones, Jahvid Best and Beanie Wells have not come close to meeting expectations. Others, like C.J. Spiller, have had their moments but have not been consistently good.

 

That's not what you want from a first-round pick.

If there were a special running back to come out of college this year, there is no doubt he would be a first-round pick—we just haven't seen one in a while. On top of that, the thinking around the league is that when you draft a running back, you are only going to get about four good years out of that player because of the beating they will take.

Anything more than that is a bonus. Teams would rather use their top choice on a player who has a longer career expectancy.

 

Since Peterson entered the NFL in 2007, there have only been two truly special backs: McCoy, who was drafted in the second round of the 2009 draft, and Chris Johnson. Teams are finding they can draft a running back who is good (but maybe not great) from the second round down.

 

Like McCoy, Forte was a second-round pick. Washington's Alfred Morris, who ran for 1,613 yards in 2012 and 1,275 in 2013, was a sixth-round selection.

Kansas City's Jamaal Charles was a third-round pick in 2008, and he has been one of the most productive backs in the AFC. Arian Foster of the Houston Texans was an undrafted free agent coming out of college. He has run for over 5,000 yards in his five-year career.

 

Three running backs were taken in the first five picks of the 2005 draft: Auburn's Ronnie Brown was the second pick, Texas' Cedric Benson went fourth overall and Auburn's Cadillac Williams went at No. 5. None of those three backs had memorable careers.

 

Benson was the most productive, running for over 6,000 yards in eight seasons. He missed the whole 2013 season with a Lisfranc injury and is hoping to catch on with a team this year. He has also had shoulder problems.

The general feeling now in the NFL is this: You need at least two running backs to be successful. Unless you have a special back like a Peterson or a Forte, teams will use their backs in a rotation. What they would like, ideally, is for the backs to complement each other. One can be a power guy, the other an elusive big-play threat.

 

 

 
 

 

 

Why do they feel that way? It goes back to what the league is getting from college programs. Most colleges have been running a rotation system with their running backs for years.

They have seen the value of limiting the amount of touches that a back gets. Fewer touches per game equals a fresher and more productive back through the course of the season.

This theory has carried over to the NFL game.

Philadelphia has a great running back in LeSean McCoy, yet the Eagles still had other players carry the ball a total of 86 times in 2012.

In New England, four different backs shared the load, with the bulk of the carries going to Stevan Ridley (178) and LeGarrette Blount (153). Blount averaged five yards per carry, yet New England let him walk in free agency, as he later signed with the Steelers.

New Orleans, which has one of the better offenses in the league, also had four backs share the workload last season.

 

On offense, running backs and tight ends get injured more often than any other position. A club's top running back partakes in an intense collision 20 to 25 times per game. This takes its toll on the player's body and often leads to physical breakdown.

 

Very few backs have a long shelf life in the NFL, and it's rare that a back goes through his career without having a surgery. Matt Forte of the Chicago Bears, who is one of the top running backs in the NFL, had posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) surgery in college and medial collateral ligament (MCL) surgery while with the Bears. Both surgeries were on the same knee.

Adrian Peterson—perhaps the best running back of this generation—has dealt with collarbone, knee, hamstring, back, ankle, foot, calf, shoulder, abdomen and groin injuries.

 

In the 2012 draft, three running backs were drafted in the first round, and two of those players were the last two picks of the opening round (Doug Martin and David Wilson, respectively). Trent Richardson was a top-five selection by Cleveland and is already considered a bust.

 

Last year, not a single running back was taken in the first round. Giovani Bernard from North Carolina was the first running back taken, and he was drafted by the Cincinnati Bengals with the fifth pick of the second round.

Looking at this year's draft, it's a strong possibility there will again be no running backs drafted in the first round. My highest-rated running back is Ohio State's Carlos Hyde, and I expect that he will be selected in the early part of the second round.

 

The most productive player in that group has been Johnson, who has averaged 1,328 yards per season in the six years he has been in the league. Still, he is not as explosive as he was earlier in his career, and his per-carry average dropped to a career-low 3.9 in 2013.

 

In both 2009 and 2010, three running backs were selected in the opening round. C.J. Spiller, who the Buffalo Bills selected in 2010, was the highest overall, being selected ninth that year. In 2011, only one runner was taken in the first round—Mark Ingram, selected by the New Orleans Saints.

 

In the history of the NFL draft, running backs were almost always looked to as premium draft choices. Clubs felt they had to have a top back in order for their offense to prosper.

 

Just six years ago, five running backs were drafted in the first round. Last year, that number decreased to zero.

In 2008, Darren McFadden was the fourth overall pick by the Oakland Raiders. Jonathan Stewart was selected by the Carolina Panthers at 13, followed by Felix Jones at 22 to the Dallas Cowboys. The Pittsburgh Steelers chose Rashard Mendenhall at 23, and the Tennessee Titans selected Chris Johnson one pick later.

Of those five running backs, only two have had what I would call a good career. Mendenhall struggled as a rookie, gaining only 58 yards. He came back to total 3,309 yards the next three seasons, but later dealt with injury problems and just recently announced his retirement.

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No running backs @ 6 please.

We need a pass rusher.

Mr. Bud Dupree....welcome to the NY Jets.

You beat Brady by putting him on his azz!

We always get a good push up the middle, now we can finish people off with speed from the outside.

If I have to watch Pace & Babin...almost....get....there....I'll puke.

Dupree is gonna end up a Freeney/Mathis type.

He'll make our pass rush scary in the 2nd half of the season.

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Even if you did your home work and doctors determined he is now 100% healthy?  This is 2015; those injuries are not nearly as serious as they once were and recovery is much quicker.

Like you said, this is 2015. Runningbacks are a dime a dozen and none of them deserve a top ten pick.

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Like you said, this is 2015. Runningbacks are a dime a dozen and none of them deserve a top ten pick.

The trend is swinging back the other way.  Last year there were no running backs taken in the first round; this year there will be two, maybe more. One of them could go top ten, if not to us, then another team like Atlanta.   

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Very little reason to ever take a running back in the top 10...

 

You can get solid running backs for next to nothing these days.   The only guy you ever take in the top 10 at that position must be so far next level.  Gurley is next level, but the injury concerns would keep me from doing that.

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The trend is swinging back the other way.  Last year there were no running backs taken in the first round; this year there will be two, maybe more. One of them could go top ten, if not to us, then another team like Atlanta.   

 

Wouldn't be surprised if the Vikings grabbed one at 11 either.

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Im curious as to where people get the idea that an RB can only play for 4 years. Adrian Peterson is going on year 9. Lynch going on year 10, Gore going on year 11, Bush is going on year 10, McCoy going on year 7, even a running back like Arian Foster who is constantly getting injured is going into his 7th season in the NFL. Now granted all of these guys have had their ups and downs but certainly someone can play the position for longer than 4 years and Gurley could be the next Adrian Peterson he has the potential of being an absolute game changer and it would fill one of the teams biggest needs, why not go after him?

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Running back is not one of the biggest team needs.   Ivory has proven to be a very good back in this league.  Ridley has proven to be a very good back in this league.  Powell is functional.

 

Secondly, Gurley is an injury problem waiting to happen. 2013 missed several games with an ankle injury and tore his ACL last season on basically ZERO contact.

 

I'd take a chance on him in the 2nd (which he won't be there) but that's it.

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macc surpassed my expectations in free agency.  I feared the structure of the 5 member FA team would be too slow moving to grab top tier day 1 FA's.

 

I also fear he may get fleeced on draft day in a bad trade

 

hopefully it is just another case of my battered jets fan syndrome and macc nails it

 

again

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If they take Gurley @ 6 I Will Projectile Vomit for an hour   :blowup:

+1 I keep reading this could happen but cannot believe we would take a guy off of an ACL with the 6th pick in the draft, the first pick of this new regime

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