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4 hours ago, JetsFanatic said:

That is why I never cared much for Ali, he would demean his opponents.  Of course the media covering his passing will never go near that when discussing his life.  However, in the big picture, It probably generated more interest in the fights and made more money for him and Frazier! 

 

Not true, I've heard many in the media today discuss today 

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2 hours ago, SAR I said:

Namath.jpgAli.jpg

RIP Muhammad Ali, sorely missed.

One can now argue that Joe Namath is the greatest living athlete of all time as Ali was really his only competition in terms of ability, influence, revolutionizing an entire sport, media, marketing, etc.

SAR I

This is an Ali thread.

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4 hours ago, JetsFanatic said:

That is why I never cared much for Ali, he would demean his opponents.  Of course the media covering his passing will never go near that when discussing his life.  However, in the big picture, It probably generated more interest in the fights and made more money for him and Frazier! 

 

most of it was psychological warfare. He did to them in the ring all the time and it worked. I wouldn't have complained about the Frazier stuff either, but he went for Joe being a gorilla and all that and it got ugly. Joe didn't deserve that, especially from Ali, whom he helped when he was down. The media is indeed covering that.

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The thing that gets lost is how tough he was. He was so flashy you forget that also had to endure some pretty punishing fights. Never got starched, never took a brutal knockout.  He was just all around, the best heavyweight ever. Not the best fighter, but up there.

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The Greatest Heavyweight fighter of all time (Sugar Ray Robinson is the greatest boxer ever IMO)

What he's done inside and outside the ring has been nothing short of amazing.

Rest easy champ

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10 hours ago, Long Island Leprechaun said:

I never liked Frazier much, but Ali treated him very badly in the press and humiliated him in way that was completely undeserved. Don't know if you ever saw that documentary on Frazier (it's really good and quite sad) but he never got over that. Not one of Ali's finest moments.

That is really the one thing I've always criticized Ali for. I'm ok with the trash talk, but Ali took it too far.

Calling Frazier an Uncle Tom and a gorilla. He crossed the line there. Frazier was born and raised in the South. 1 generation removed from slavery. Actually grew up picking cotton out in the fields. He was the furthest thing from an Uncle Tom. Then you go and call him a gorilla? Disgusting. Given the racial connotations behind that word, no one should be calling a Black man a monkey, especially a fellow Black man.

Love Ali, but those Frazier incidents will always leave a black mark on his legacy for me

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I remember listening to the 1st Ali Frasier fight, I stayed over a friends house. His father showed us the Newspaper the next day with both fighters faces swollen & totally messed up. It was exciting to listen to, and the photos the next morning confirmed what an epic 15 round battle it was. Probably the best ever.

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I only wish he had retired after the Foreman fight.
There was no need for more after that. RIP champ. You were the greatest.

And I hope Don King burns in hell, when his time comes, for what he did to Ali and other fighters.

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A little history for those that may be unaware.

Ali ( then Cassius Clay ) borrowed his pre-fight schtick after meeting and seeing the antics of pro wrestler Gorgeous George who would antagonize wrestling fans with effeminate behavior. The effect caused ticket sales to explode at his matches with fans hoping to see him get his azz kicked. It  worked so well that after a decade absence MSG once again permitted pro wrestling in the arena with George receiving 50% of sold out gates.

The outrageous behavior worked for Ali also with him getting huge paydays from fights on TV and sold out arenas with many boxing fans hoping to see him get beat.

As far as disrespecting Smokin Joe. It is the roughest of all sports and being a gentleman wins no points.They hated each other and Joe started the fire by refering to Ali as the draft dodger. 

I admired Ali greatly but have no illusions of him being a perfect guy. We all have flaws and fame magnifies and exposes them.

 

 

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55 minutes ago, King P said:

That is really the one thing I've always criticized Ali for. I'm ok with the trash talk, but Ali took it too far.

Calling Frazier an Uncle Tom and a gorilla. He crossed the line there. Frazier was born and raised in the South. 1 generation removed from slavery. Actually grew up picking cotton out in the fields. He was the furthest thing from an Uncle Tom. Then you go and call him a gorilla? Disgusting. Given the racial connotations behind that word, no one should be calling a Black man a monkey, especially a fellow Black man.

Love Ali, but those Frazier incidents will always leave a black mark on his legacy for me

+1

He proclaimed himself "The Greatest of All Time" but what he did to Joe Frazier was the "Ugliest Sportsmanship of All Time".

He was a great fighter but no angel.  RIP.

 

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http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york-jets/post/_/id/60760/that-time-muhammad-ali-sparred-with-a-future-jets-coach

Before he became a football coach, Rich Kotite dabbled in boxing. Actually, it was more than dabbling. The Brooklyn-born Kotite attended the University of Miami and became the school's top heavyweight as a freshman.

It's also where he met Muhammad Ali.

Ali trained at Angelo Dundee's famed Fifth Street Gym, which wasn't far from the Miami campus. One thing led to another, and Kotite ended up sparring with the great Ali.

Kotite was occasionally asked about it during his years as the head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles and New York Jets. He loved boxing, but he always downplayed his sessions with Ali.

"They put something in the press guide, and all of a sudden it's like I was one of Muhammad Ali's major sparring partners," Kotite once said.

"It's true, I did spar some with Ali -- he was still known as Cassius Clay then -- when I was a student at the University of Miami. But it was no big deal. He worked with so many people. He'd go a round or two with this guy, a round or two with that guy. I'm sure he wouldn't remember me at all. Probably none of the big-name pros I sparred with would remember me."

Kotite, 73, coached the Jets in 1995 and 1996, compiling a 4-28 record. It was his last job in football. He lives a quiet life in Staten Island and doesn't do interviews. Ali died Friday night at the age of 74.

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9 hours ago, Charlie Brown said:

To those who may not remember why Ali was and is considered a Great fighter in the ring please see this.

One more time he was the Greatest fighter in the ring.... :)

 

excellent vid.  Never saw this before.  Thank you!

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16 hours ago, Charlie Brown said:

To those who may not remember why Ali was and is considered a Great fighter in the ring please see this.

One more time he was the Greatest fighter in the ring.... :)

 

 

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