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Mark Gastineau suffering from dementia, Alzheimers and Parkinson's disease (MERGED)

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Very sad news about a Jets legend. 

Jets legend Mark Gastineau suffering from dementia, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease 

Mark Gastineau recorded 107.5 sacks over his 10-year career with the Jets.

Mark Gastineau recorded 107.5 sacks over his 10-year career with the Jets.

  (TOM BERG/NFL)

Jets legend Mark Gastineau has revealed that he is suffering from serious health problems.

“When my results came back, I had dementia, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s,” the former Jets defensive lineman said on WOR Thursday evening. “Those were three things that I have.”

Gastineau said he received the diagnoses roughly a year ago and traced his illnesses back to football. However, he believes the game can be played safely now.

“I know that there’s techniques out there that if I would have had ‘em, if I would have had the techniques out there that I’m teaching now to these kids, I know I would not be probably...I know I wouldn’t have the results that I have now,” he said.

“I led with my head all the time,” Gastineau added.

Gastineau, 60, played 10 years for the Jets and was part of the famed New York Sack Exchange.

On the radio Thursday, despite suffering from major health problems, the former defensive lineman was promoting USAFootball.com and the Heads Up Football program, believing that that makes the game safer.

“The only reason I would allow my child to play is because of this USAFootball.com,” he said. “I would not allow my child to play if I did not have this Heads Up Football. There’s no way in the world. You cannot expect your child to not be injured if you do not enter this program. If a high school doesn’t have this program, there should not be a program.”

USA Football is a youth football program and Heads Up Football is a joint program of the NFL and USA Football to improve the safety of the youth game.

“It’s something I want every player who goes out and plays to be protected in the best way that they can be protected,” he said.

Gastineau said he wanted his own health problems to be a “warning" to parents.

“I don’t want (my diagnosis) to over shadow the Heads Up Program," he said. "I want it to be a warning to mothers and fathers to be able to put their kids in the safe places to be able to carry on a team sports that I think is going to be way more beneficial for them than if they didn’t have it in their lives.”

Gastineau at times rambled through the lengthy interview with WOR, hitting on several topics including his love for Shea Stadium and the fans there.

The former defensive lineman was enshrined in the Jets’ Ring of Honor in 2012. He gave an eclectic and slurred speech during halftime of the Jets’ Monday night loss to the Texans in October of that year when he was inducted alongside former wideout Wesley Walker.

“I’m in a good place,” said Gastineau toward the end of the interview. “I’m not going to fall back. I’m going to help as many people as I can.”

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2 minutes ago, Kleckineau said:

He certainly provided many highlight plays for us during his career. He is no angel. A flawed human like all of us.

God bless Mark. I hope he can manage his situation, get help and carry on and still enjoy life.

Please keep the high road haters.

Very well said!

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Loved gastineau.  You cant talk about the Jets in the 80s w/o thinking Gastineau.  

One of the greats of this franchise.

Sad to hear.

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Sad news.  These guys gave so much of themselves, left so much on the field and are still paying the price.

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If related to football, this is a shame for sure...I certainly wish him the best.

I applaud the NFL for the work they've done with head injuries, but the sad fact is that it is a violent game and they're never gonna eliminate that threat.

But, Gastineau is 60...the age where some people start to exhibit signs of dementia and Alzheimer's (which are largely subjective in diagnosis).  Also, anabolic steroids have recently been implicated in possible brain damage and possibly with the development of Alzheimer's.  Is it football? Or just a consequence of life or habits?  We'll probably never know.

Sad to say the least, and I wish him nothing but the best.

 

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But Bruce Arians said that parents who won't let their kids play football are fools...

 

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Very sad.  After years of collisions playing football, he then attempted a boxing career. Having 17 fights over 5 years, had to only add to the brain trauma he had probably already received as a player.

My prayers are with you, Mark.

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Mark.jpg

Mark-300x208.jpgLegendary NY Jets defensive end Mark Gastineau was on the radio on Thursday and he revealed some pretty sad news. He said that he is suffering from  Dementia, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. The Daily News provided this update:

“When my results came back, I had dementia, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s,” the former Jets defensive lineman said on WOR Thursday evening. “Those were three things that I have.”

Gastineau said he received the diagnoses roughly a year ago and traced his illnesses back to football.

“You know, my first reaction was that I didn’t believe it. I couldn’t believe it,” Gastineau told the Daily News in a phone interview Thursday night. “My second reaction was how can I help other people coming in to the NFL? That’s what it’s all about.”

Gastineau played 10 seasons with the Jets and he was well known for his sack dance. As one of the members of the sack exchange he officially recorded 74 sacks in his career. Although the actual number is higher because the NFL didn’t officially recognize a sack as a stat until 1982.

He was experiencing a bit of a resurgence in 1988 as he led the AFC with 7 sacks through 7 games. This coming after injury plagued seasons in 1985 and 1986 that produced only 6.5 sacks (25 games in total). The five-time pro bowler retired from football in 1988 after 7 games because his fiance, Brigitte Nielsen, was diagnosed with cancer.

From Newsday:

“I don’t want [my diagnosis] to overshadow the Heads Up Program,” said Gastineau, who added that he “led with my head all the time” when he played.

“I want it to be a warning to mothers and fathers to be able to put their kids in the safe places to be able to carry on a team sport that I think is going to be way more beneficial for them than if they didn’t have it in their lives.”

During the 30-minute interview, Gastineau said he would allow his child to play football only “because of this USAFootball.com. I would not allow my child to play if I did not have this Heads Up Football. There’s no way in the world.

“You cannot expect your child to not be injured if you do not enter this program. If a high school doesn’t have this program, there should not be a program.”

As a player Mark Gastineau had his share of negative publicity and he definitely made his share of mistakes off the field. I have seen Mark at many Jets events in recent years and he seems to be at peace. He has stated many times that he found God. Mark will be in our prayers and this post from our forums sums it up very well.

He certainly provided many highlight plays for us during his career. He is no angel. A flawed human like all of us.

God bless Mark. I hope he can manage his situation, get help and carry on and still enjoy life.

Jetnationcom?d=yIl2AUoC8zA Jetnationcom?d=qj6IDK7rITs
3YS4KGhczB4

Click here to read the full story...

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everyone should feel for gastineau.  he certainly brought some excitement to the jets back in the 80's.  there haven't been many guys who could rush the passer as effectively.

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7 hours ago, Charlie Brown said:

I live with my father and take care of him who was a NYPD Cops.. Cop....

He led anti-organized crime task force and stuff in the early 1980's.  As a plain clothes detective he went after Crazy Joe Gallo in early 1970's.... and so on and he can't remember any of it, really,  

But as i tell him every day I love you and I'm your memory now

God please bless Mark Gastineau.. 

For we know, All things

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It's been more than obvious that Gastineau has been punch drunk for a long time now.  Who cares if the guy was a jerk at times, he was our jerk.  I wouldn't wish this sh!t on my worst enemy.  It has always been my biggest fear, and when I lapsed into a coma years back, it changed my life forever. I shouldn't be alive, and science cannot explain why I'm here. 

Charlie Brown, my Dad had his mind but died of complications of Parkinsonism. He was depressed and furious, and deteriorated very quickly.  He was on the brink of asking me to get him out of here, if you can discern what I mean. It was coming on a fast track. I didn't discuss it with anyone. A crazy unforeseen health complication released me from what was looming, but I would have done it, consequences and all, no question. I know this topic is a loaded weapon and ten times more nuclear than Indian Pt. and Chernobyl put together, but I guess what I'm trying to say is that sometimes the universe is randomly merciful. 

I saw an interesting show on early onset dementia on 60 minutes, in of all places, Medellin, Colombia. All things aside, it seems that dementia is off the charts on the rise, period.  Do you have anyone to give you some relief?  I wish you strength. Peace to you. 

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57 minutes ago, jetophile said:

It's been more than obvious that Gastineau has been punch drunk for a long time now.  Who cares if the guy was a jerk at times, he was our jerk.  I wouldn't wish this sh!t on my worst enemy.  It has always been my biggest fear, and when I lapsed into a coma years back, it changed my life forever. I shouldn't be alive, and science cannot explain why I'm here. 

Charlie Brown, my Dad had his mind but died of complications of Parkinsonism. He was depressed and furious, and deteriorated very quickly.  He was on the brink of asking me to get him out of here, if you can discern what I mean. It was coming on a fast track. I didn't discuss it with anyone. A crazy unforeseen health complication released me from what was looming, but I would have done it, consequences and all, no question. I know this topic is a loaded weapon and ten times more nuclear than Indian Pt. and Chernobyl put together, but I guess what I'm trying to say is that sometimes the universe is randomly merciful. 

I saw an interesting show on early onset dementia on 60 minutes, in of all places, Medellin, Colombia. All things aside, it seems that dementia is off the charts on the rise, period.  Do you have anyone to give you some relief?  I wish you strength. Peace to you. 

Numbers the 6th chapter vs  24-26  says it all beloved . 

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sad to hear.  

my dad is showing signs of early onset dementia and/or Alzheimers (his mom had it too).  already is tough to deal with.

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25 minutes ago, Tinstar said:

Numbers the 6th chapter vs  24-26  says it all beloved . 

Jan Crouch in her pink wig, I get it. C'mon, guy. You're going to cause a lock bigger than Scientology. 

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1 minute ago, jetophile said:

Jan Crouch in her pink wig, I get it. C'mon, guy. You're going to cause a lock bigger than Scientology. 

I am who I am, and I can't help that .  

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That's awful news.  Sorry to hear.  Best wishes to the Gastineau family. 

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4 minutes ago, Tinstar said:

I am who I am, and I can't help that .  

That's nice, and I'm sure it comes from a good place. Just don't bother people unless they ask you. 

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1 minute ago, jetophile said:

That's nice, and I'm sure it comes from a good place. Just don't bother people unless they ask you. 

Understood .

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good luck mark-you played the game with heart and sorry to see the game has left you with some problems-sadly a good amount of our former stars face some pretty bad effects from their playing days -

 

 

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1 hour ago, jbt said:

sad to hear.  

my dad is showing signs of early onset dementia and/or Alzheimers (his mom had it too).  already is tough to deal with.

I'm so sorry. How old is he? It's definitely genetics. Big time. Maybe this can become an info thread. I wish you the best. 

 

 

 

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11 minutes ago, jetophile said:

I'm so sorry. How old is he? It's definitely genetics. Big time. Maybe this can become an info thread. I wish you the best. 

 

he is 67 years old but has been declining ever since he was forced to retire a couple of years ago.  he still has a part time job but i dont think that will not last much longer.  not looking forward to him getting worse.  i remember my grandma coming over and not knowing who any of us were, even her son.  been very tough on my mom who is 2 years younger but still all there thank god (she also lost her oldest brother to cancer, and another brother who is just 60 had 3 strokes and is now in a home).  getting old sucks

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I lost my Dad last year to the horrible condition known as Alzheimers. Hopefully Mark will be happy, safe, and surrounded by family and friends who love him and will treat him with patience and respect.

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1 minute ago, section314 said:

I lost my Dad last year to the horrible condition known as Alzheimers. Hopefully Mark will be happy, safe, and surrounded by family and friends who love him and will treat him with patience and respect.

Ugh. RIP. Thanks for chiming in. 

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