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Oh yes, i did...... 

I have a flight case board that breaks my back for gigs. This will sound nuts, I genuinely wish I could carry it right now to a gig. I’d never complain about carrying it again. Sent from my iPho

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13 hours ago, southparkcpa said:

Any Taylors in the group?  I own an Taylor 810, a Furch (Top European guitar) and a Seagull.

Wow nice, the two dreadnaught’s are both Taylor 100 series. To the left is a Takamine Classical, an old Yamaha 12 string, the dark one w cutaway on the floor is a Martin X series and the old antique one is a 60’s giannani I had to rebuild. Someday I would love to buy a higher end Taylor or Martin but the one’s I have suit me just fine as I mostly just play for fun. 
 

ive played a few Seagulls and they always sound so bright and clean. The skinny top neck always seem to make it hard to do anything outside of open chords tho

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4 minutes ago, HessStation said:

Wow nice, the two dreadnaught’s are both Taylor 100 series. To the left is a Takamine Classical, an old Yamaha 12 string, the dark one w cutaway on the floor is a Martin X series and the old antique one is a 60’s giannani I had to rebuild. Someday I would love to buy a higher end Taylor or Martin but the one’s I have suit me just fine as I mostly just play for fun. 
 

ive played a few Seagulls and they always sound so bright and clean. The skinny top neck always seem to make it hard to do anything outside of open chords tho

My Seagull was an impulse purchase in Charleston at a pawn shop. Think I paid $250 for a $500 guitar.  I wanted to have a guitar for the beach etc. But the Taylor 810 I bought in 95 and still sounds like new, maybe better. Love it. Nice collection you have!

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18 minutes ago, southparkcpa said:

My Seagull was an impulse purchase in Charleston at a pawn shop. Think I paid $250 for a $500 guitar.  I wanted to have a guitar for the beach etc. But the Taylor 810 I bought in 95 and still sounds like new, maybe better. Love it. Nice collection you have!

That Taylor must sound beautiful, that’s an amazing guitar!! Some day I’ll pony up :). Seagulls are such a great buy for the price too. There’s a mom/pop shop down the street that really showcases them. Love it man! 

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Did not know of her, The kid can PLAY ! Maybe music isn't quite dead yet. :) Nice find SP.

Found this on the internet about her. Impressive. Should see a lot more of her in the future

Musicians such as Guthrie Govan, Dave Weckl, Jordan Rudess, Steve Vai, Mike Stern, George Brooks and Narada Michael Walden have shared a stage or studio with Dey, and no modern NAMM Show is complete without her.

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One more thing about Mohini Dey, When we were in India we asked about music and whether there was any interest in progressive electric. Our guide actually knew his stuff and told me that if you can play, you can work full time doing jazz. They love it but do not have many players. You can also live like a king on just a few bucks. Still haven;t convinced the wife to move there yet. :)

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On 12/19/2019 at 6:15 PM, southparkcpa said:

Any of you guys ever heard of this kid?? Pretty talented.  @Snell41@The Crimson King@HighPitch 

 

 

 

Never heard of her... but wow shes good.

 

i have this new funk fusion project that im excited about. Just hooked up with a super solid bassist. Hes real good and odd. Ill post some jame clips in a few weeks

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On 12/19/2019 at 6:12 PM, southparkcpa said:

Any Taylors in the group?  I own an Taylor 810, a Furch (Top European guitar) and a Seagull.

Nice. Not much of a huge acoustic fan but i mentioned i like these yamaha 3/4 size thingies to my wife. I figured it would be fun for the rv and camping out at music festivals and just 2 hrs ago i noticed a guitar sized box behind the tree. Well, not quite guitar size but maybe like.... ummm. Hmmmm say 3/4 the size. What can it be?

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Wow nice, the two dreadnaught’s are both Taylor 100 series. To the left is a Takamine Classical, an old Yamaha 12 string, the dark one w cutaway on the floor is a Martin X series and the old antique one is a 60’s giannani I had to rebuild. Someday I would love to buy a higher end Taylor or Martin but the one’s I have suit me just fine as I mostly just play for fun. 
 
ive played a few Seagulls and they always sound so bright and clean. The skinny top neck always seem to make it hard to do anything outside of open chords tho


Is the MartinX series the Koa hpl? If so tell me what you think of it.


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On 12/21/2019 at 2:40 AM, Snell41 said:

 


Is the MartinX series the Koa hpl? If so tell me what you think of it.


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No, it’s a GPCX2AE Macassar. I absolutely love it. I’ve heard all the negativity around the HPL back and sides but the dark look originally  caught my eye and don’t care or mind, think the look is killer. There is a muted tone to it but I actually love it as I tend to pluck and pick at home a lot and don’t want to be too loud around the family.   I’ve gone through stages where I’ve spent a ton of time at Guitar Center playing the high end Martin and Taylor’s, so much I’m good friends with two of the sales guys who’ve been there forever, I’ve bought stuff from them, hang out with them and they’ve never minded me spending a lot of time playing around with the 2-3k guitars....where I’m going with this is, playability, it’s amazing, this MartinX plays as easy as any guitar I’ve ever played. Especially if you want to dance up and down the neck playing scales slides/pulls/hammers etc...

 

If I want to play open chords/rhythm I will always pick up the Taylor. It’s deeper, brighter, more punchy. But if I want to get more jammy with licks and scales the Martin has the easiest neck ever, the action is perfect without any set up needed (at least the one I got) and there’s still a great mid range tone almost as good as the higher ends. Closest guitar I’ve played that’s as easy as playing an electric. 
 

My one and only concern is I read straight from a supposed luthier in an online review that bc of the HPL back/sides the guitar isn’t built to last. I mean who knows about that. But that would be my only concern. Imo great look, feel, playability off the charts with still a very nice tone.  

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No, it’s a GPCX2AE Macassar. I absolutely love it. I’ve heard all the negativity around the HPL back and sides but the dark look originally  caught my eye and don’t care or mind, think the look is killer. There is a muted tone to it but I actually love it as I tend to pluck and pick at home a lot and don’t want to be too loud around the family.   I’ve gone through stages where I’ve spent a ton of time at Guitar Center playing the high end Martin and Taylor’s, so much I’m good friends with two of the sales guys who’ve been there forever, I’ve bought stuff from them, hang out with them and they’ve never minded me spending a lot of time playing around with the 2-3k guitars....where I’m going with this is, playability, it’s amazing, this MartinX plays as easy as any guitar I’ve ever played. Especially if you want to dance up and down the neck playing scales slides/pulls/hammers etc...

 

If I want to play open chords/rhythm I will always pick up the Taylor. It’s deeper, brighter, more punchy. But if I want to get more jammy with licks and scales the Martin has the easiest neck ever, the action is perfect without any set up needed (at least the one I got) and there’s still a great mid range tone almost as good as the higher ends. Closest guitar I’ve played that’s as easy as playing an electric. 

 

My one and only concern is I read straight from a supposed luthier in an online review that bc of the HPL back/sides the guitar isn’t built to last. I mean who knows about that. But that would be my only concern. Imo great look, feel, playability off the charts with still a very nice tone.  

 

I’m so glad you said this, I own one as well. I had a $2500 Taylor, Gibson’s, High end Breedlove before they were even known, but I have never played a guitar that plays as easily as the Martin X and I love the tone of it. Electronics are not the best I admit. As far as it lasting, it’s a $600 guitar. Not really concerned. A solid musician can easily use this live and have it paid off in 1-3 gigs and use it till the wheels fall off. It feels like a working man’s guitar and I love it!

 

 

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A question for you acoustical folks:

Do you use your acoustics plugged in? If so, direct (DI box?) or through an amp?

Do you use an FX processor or pedal(s)? If so which one(s)?

Do you use a slide? glass or metal?

Do you fingerpick or use a pick? If so what thickness?

I am new to this so any advice would be most educational,. 

 

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A question for you acoustical folks:
Do you use your acoustics plugged in? If so, direct (DI box?) or through an amp?
Do you use an FX processor or pedal(s)? If so which one(s)?
Do you use a slide? glass or metal?
Do you fingerpick or use a pick? If so what thickness?
I am new to this so any advice would be most educational,. 
 


My rig is plugged through a Boss ACS Pro 120 amp. I use the reverb on it, that’s all. Has harmony and loop but not great. I run through a JamMan 2 if I want delay or loop. Glass slide, both fingers and pick, 2mm Dunlop Gator.


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11 hours ago, Snell41 said:

 


My rig is plugged through a Boss ACS Pro 120 amp. I use the reverb on it, that’s all. Has harmony and loop but not great. I run through a JamMan 2 if I want delay or loop. Glass slide, both fingers and pick, 2mm Dunlop Gator.


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Had to look up that amp. Nice piece ! Do you use the mic input? Seems like a good amp for harp too.

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Had to look up that amp. Nice piece ! Do you use the mic input? Seems like a good amp for harp too.


Yes I do, but I do not use harmony functions at all. I don’t use any of it other than reverb on guitar and mic channels. The amp is very warm and does the job for most acoustic settings. This rig is my weekday “moneymaker”. 2 hours for a couple to a few hundred bucks on a weeknight and I’m home to put the kids to bed.


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19 hours ago, Snell41 said:

Do any of you guys record? If so what does your home studio consist of?


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Goal for 2020 is to make some CD's for giving away purposes. Used to do cassettes (via a Tascam 424 into a Sony mix down and copy deck) and people actually listened to them. Well some people did :). One of the keyboard players in the band that I am quitting next time they call does this with a  new CD every month just using his Korg, the sequencer and a four track. Actually comes out good and I look forward to them. 

Kinda outdated stuff but here's the home studio:

Controller:

Roland FA-08 w/ expansion downloaded and all sorts of data cards left over from the old JV-1000. Includes a very useful sequencer and looper.

Modules:

Akai 2800 sampler hooked up to a Glyph CD ROM with about 50 CD's of sounds, pads, patches, drum patterns, instruments etc. Got addicted to these. Fav was the Distorted Reality I and II and Pinder's Mellotron CD.

Korg X5DR, Kurzweil piano, Yamaha P50, Roland JV-1080, Roland SH-32

Board:

Mackie 16 track with dbx 166A, Roland SRV3030, Boss VF-1 and a Behringer Ultra Gain Pro in the inserts and such. Samson amp and JBL monitors through two of the outs. Other two to whatever else.

Other fun toys included a DIgitech harmony workstation and a Boss VT-1 for vocals and of course BBE sonic maximizers here and there

Some how all this should be used to record backing tracks into an 8 track Tascam DP01/FX/CD for the purpose of recording guitar tracks

Guitars (about 25 of them, some nice, some cheapos) to be played through the rack thing described earlier in this thread and any number of combinations of pedals (well over 100 of those by now) and multi fx (also way too many of those). Additional fun is the Roland Ready Strat to play through a VG-8EX and a GT-1 

Also will use electric violin (Fender FV-1), and harp (Lone Wolf effects). Wife wants me to play the sax again (last time I played, Namath was a rookie) to stick it to a certain individual (long story). Also people keep giving me gifts of instruments that I will never use like harmoniums and ukes. 

There is also an old ARP Axxe from the band days of the 70-80's but the Rolands cover that so much better that it just collects dust. 

I do have an extra lap top and Abelon so that should work itself in eventually but the sequencer on the FA-08 is pretty good to start off at least learning the recording device.

Not having kids, Mrs. Crimson let me take over the spare bedroom which is now chock full. Too bad the talent level doesn't match the volume of toys :). Problem is that every time I go in there to learn the recording device, I just end up making a few sequences or loops to jam over and lose a few hours. 

So what do you more modern folks use for home studios these days?

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Goal for 2020 is to make some CD's for giving away purposes. Used to do cassettes (via a Tascam 424 into a Sony mix down and copy deck) and people actually listened to them. Well some people did :). One of the keyboard players in the band that I am quitting next time they call does this with a  new CD every month just using his Korg, the sequencer and a four track. Actually comes out good and I look forward to them. 
Kinda outdated stuff but here's the home studio:
Controller:
Roland FA-08 w/ expansion downloaded and all sorts of data cards left over from the old JV-1000. Includes a very useful sequencer and looper.
Modules:
Akai 2800 sampler hooked up to a Glyph CD ROM with about 50 CD's of sounds, pads, patches, drum patterns, instruments etc. Got addicted to these. Fav was the Distorted Reality I and II and Pinder's Mellotron CD.
Korg X5DR, Kurzweil piano, Yamaha P50, Roland JV-1080, Roland SH-32
Board:
Mackie 16 track with dbx 166A, Roland SRV3030, Boss VF-1 and a Behringer Ultra Gain Pro in the inserts and such. Samson amp and JBL monitors through two of the outs. Other two to whatever else.
Other fun toys included a DIgitech harmony workstation and a Boss VT-1 for vocals and of course BBE sonic maximizers here and there
Some how all this should be used to record backing tracks into an 8 track Tascam DP01/FX/CD for the purpose of recording guitar tracks
Guitars (about 25 of them, some nice, some cheapos) to be played through the rack thing described earlier in this thread and any number of combinations of pedals (well over 100 of those by now) and multi fx (also way too many of those). Additional fun is the Roland Ready Strat to play through a VG-8EX and a GT-1 
Also will use electric violin (Fender FV-1), and harp (Lone Wolf effects). Wife wants me to play the sax again (last time I played, Namath was a rookie) to stick it to a certain individual (long story). Also people keep giving me gifts of instruments that I will never use like harmoniums and ukes. 
There is also an old ARP Axxe from the band days of the 70-80's but the Rolands cover that so much better that it just collects dust. 
I do have an extra lap top and Abelon so that should work itself in eventually but the sequencer on the FA-08 is pretty good to start off at least learning the recording device.
Not having kids, Mrs. Crimson let me take over the spare bedroom which is now chock full. Too bad the talent level doesn't match the volume of toys :). Problem is that every time I go in there to learn the recording device, I just end up making a few sequences or loops to jam over and lose a few hours. 
So what do you more modern folks use for home studios these days?


This is spectacular on so many levels! I used to have a Tascam tape 4 track. I’d give anything to ever find and listen to those. These days I use Pro Tools on my laptop, and a simple Scarlett interface, 6 inputs. My keyboard player’s living room is an entire studio. Drums, amps, mics, etc all wired in the walls it’a amazing. Generally I write and record songs acoustically at my house, then the band will full record at his studio.


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HEADS UP

Musician's Friend Deal of the Day is Deal of the Hour today. Discounts for that hour on one specific piece is huge (50-80%). A lot of the stuff you won't want but every so often a useful unit comes up like a pedal ( a lot of Pigtronix and Way Huge) or some patch cords. Missed out on a nice cable tester and the Boss cables earlier

Here's the link:

https://www.musiciansfriend.com//stupid?source=3WWRWXGG&gclid=CIyyytXO7csCFQqKaQodU-oOag&kwid=80365921220x16540283060x154110380

  

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On 12/29/2019 at 2:41 PM, Snell41 said:

Do any of you guys record? If so what does your home studio consist of?


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I have just tried to make a little studio room in the basement after years of doing nothing.  I have installed some old recording software i had and now I have to relearn how to use it.

i am also awful awful rusty with the guitar and keyboards so another thing i have to kick my self in the butt to get back to.

I have my trusty old acoustic guitar and a cheap electric which will do the job and a decent fx machine for the electric.

I gave my 12 string guitar to a relative which I kind of regret but it was becoming a massive pain to keep in tune.

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21 hours ago, Beerfish said:

I have just tried to make a little studio room in the basement after years of doing nothing.  I have installed some old recording software i had and now I have to relearn how to use it.

i am also awful awful rusty with the guitar and keyboards so another thing i have to kick my self in the butt to get back to.

I have my trusty old acoustic guitar and a cheap electric which will do the job and a decent fx machine for the electric.

I gave my 12 string guitar to a relative which I kind of regret but it was becoming a massive pain to keep in tune.

Oooh, I smell gear acquisitions coming :) 

 

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HEADS UP for E-Lectric GUITARISTS:

Musician's Friend Stupid Deal of the Day is the MXR M250 Double-Double Overdrive, on sale for one day only. This lists at $130 and MF is selling it for $60. I think that it is usually $100 or so, maybe less at the big stores.

It is two OD's in one pedal, supposedly clones of the one of the Tube Screamers and the OCD. You can't stack them but there is a switch on the pedal to change from one to the other. Seems useful to have and got good reviews. 

MXR makes some nice stuff and the price caught my eye. Hope this helps someone here.  

You can't have too many overdrives. Well, you can, but that is not what I am telling Mrs. Crimson

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11 hours ago, munchmemory said:

Got one of these little darlings for Xmas (amPlug2).  Fantastic sound which allows you to blast away into headphones without bothering anyone else at home.

amPlugRockG2-large.jpg?v=8014fdf85557ab5

Always wondered how those things were. Any reverb or OD?

EDIT: Nevermind, just looked it up

Offering the easiest way to enjoy true analog amplifier sound in your headphones, the amPlug series has been a bestseller since it first appeared in 2007.

With amPlug 2, the crucial analog circuit has been drastically improved, and each model now provides three modes. Guitar types provide multi-effect functionality, and a rhythm function has been added to the bass type. A foldable plug mechanism that rotates 180 degrees and an auto power-off function are additional features that contribute significantly to improved convenience and ease of use.

The amPlug is the simplest way to get serious sound; occupying virtually no space, it's an ideal choice for any guitarist or bassist.

Plug the amPlug into your guitar and enjoy serious sound. It's that simple!
To use the palm-sized amPlug, just plug it into your guitar and grab your headphones. Playing your guitar or bass with amPlug results in serious amp sound that's overflowing with presence. A wide range of variation is available, as the lineup consists of four models: "AC30" provides the AC30 top-boost sound, "Classic Rock" gives you the classic crunch sound of a UK-made 100W amp, "Metal" delivers the extreme high-gain sound of a US-made amp, and "Bass" is designed specifically for bass.

A completely analog design accurately simulates the circuits of classic tube amplifiers, resulting in a rich, detailed sound.

While retaining the fully analog multi-stage gain circuit, additional refinements have been made toward reproducing the sound and performance of real tube amps. These refinements include factors such as reproducing the way a tube amp responds to different guitars, pickups, and volume as well as recreating the sense of air movement within the speaker cabinet. As a result, the carefully selected circuit structure and components of the new amPlug delivers a more highly evolved sound.

Nine selectable effects provide a great range of sonic variation
The second-generation amPlug adds a variety of new functions. To give you more variety, each amp provides three modes. "AC30" provides use of a tremolo circuit, "Classic Rock" features a mid-boost, "Metal" gives you mid-cut and "Bass" allows the amount of gain to be switched. The three guitar-type models also provide nine selectable effects with three types of Chorus, Delay and Reverb, while "Bass" contains nine different rhythm patterns. With versatile sound and functionality that is uncommon of such a compact unit, these models enable you to get even more serious about your guitar or bass playing.

Foldable plug that rotates 180 degrees
The plug that you insert into your guitar can rotate in five steps up to 180 degrees, enabling it to be adjusted for optimal visibility. This design also allows even more compact storage in your guitar's case or gig bag.

Auto power-off function ensures longer battery life
We've added a function that automatically turns off the power even, if you leave the unit with the power on. Since this function works by detecting operations or audio signals within a certain length of time (30 minutes), it has absolutely no effect on normal use. This feature further enhances the convenience of the amPlug.

amPlug is the most convenient way to play
With the amPlug providing up to 17 hours of battery-powered operation, you'll be able to play anytime and anywhere. Since there's no need for a guitar cable, it's a great way of practicing at home, or warming up before a live performance or while on tour. Also, there's an AUX in jack for your MP3 player, so you can jam along with your favorite songs.

Highlights
No need for a guitar cable! Plug it directly into your guitar; the latest version of this headphone guitar amp is the fastest way to get authentic amplifier sound.
The fully-analog circuit has been totally reworked for an even clearer and more present sound!
"Classic Rock" delivers the classic crunch of a UK-made 100W amp.
Each model provides three amp modes, giving you even more variety.
Nine selectable effects (Chorus x 3, Delay x 3, Reverb x 3) are built into the guitar-type models.
A multi-stage gain circuit featuring VOX's proprietary analog technology perfectly reproduces the complex distortion created by a vacuum tube amplifier.
New folding plug mechanism rotates 180 degrees to fit any guitar
Play anytime, anywhere with up to 17 hours of battery life
Use the AUX input to jam along with your smartphone, tablet, or MP3 player

Features

  • Modes: MidBoost Off/1/2
  • Effects: Chorus 1/2/3, Delay 1/2/3, Reverb 1/2/3
  • Headphone Out
  • AUX In
  • Battery Life:
  • amPlug 2 AC30/ amPlug 2 Metal / amPlug 2 Classic Rock:
  • 11 hours (With alkaline batteries, FX on)
  • 17 hours (With alkaline batteries, FX off)
  • 4 hours (With zinc-carbon batteries, FX on)
  • 9 hours (With zinc-carbon batteries, FX off)
  • Dimensions: 86 x 80 x 31 mm / 3.39" x 3.15" x 1.22"
  • Weight: 40 g / 1.41 oz. (excluding batteries)
  • Accessories: two AAA alkaline batteries

Cool !  So Metal or Classic Rock … hmmmmm

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13 hours ago, The Crimson King said:

Always wondered how those things were. Any reverb or OD?

EDIT: Nevermind, just looked it up

Offering the easiest way to enjoy true analog amplifier sound in your headphones, the amPlug series has been a bestseller since it first appeared in 2007.

With amPlug 2, the crucial analog circuit has been drastically improved, and each model now provides three modes. Guitar types provide multi-effect functionality, and a rhythm function has been added to the bass type. A foldable plug mechanism that rotates 180 degrees and an auto power-off function are additional features that contribute significantly to improved convenience and ease of use.

The amPlug is the simplest way to get serious sound; occupying virtually no space, it's an ideal choice for any guitarist or bassist.

Plug the amPlug into your guitar and enjoy serious sound. It's that simple!
To use the palm-sized amPlug, just plug it into your guitar and grab your headphones. Playing your guitar or bass with amPlug results in serious amp sound that's overflowing with presence. A wide range of variation is available, as the lineup consists of four models: "AC30" provides the AC30 top-boost sound, "Classic Rock" gives you the classic crunch sound of a UK-made 100W amp, "Metal" delivers the extreme high-gain sound of a US-made amp, and "Bass" is designed specifically for bass.

A completely analog design accurately simulates the circuits of classic tube amplifiers, resulting in a rich, detailed sound.

While retaining the fully analog multi-stage gain circuit, additional refinements have been made toward reproducing the sound and performance of real tube amps. These refinements include factors such as reproducing the way a tube amp responds to different guitars, pickups, and volume as well as recreating the sense of air movement within the speaker cabinet. As a result, the carefully selected circuit structure and components of the new amPlug delivers a more highly evolved sound.

Nine selectable effects provide a great range of sonic variation
The second-generation amPlug adds a variety of new functions. To give you more variety, each amp provides three modes. "AC30" provides use of a tremolo circuit, "Classic Rock" features a mid-boost, "Metal" gives you mid-cut and "Bass" allows the amount of gain to be switched. The three guitar-type models also provide nine selectable effects with three types of Chorus, Delay and Reverb, while "Bass" contains nine different rhythm patterns. With versatile sound and functionality that is uncommon of such a compact unit, these models enable you to get even more serious about your guitar or bass playing.

Foldable plug that rotates 180 degrees
The plug that you insert into your guitar can rotate in five steps up to 180 degrees, enabling it to be adjusted for optimal visibility. This design also allows even more compact storage in your guitar's case or gig bag.

Auto power-off function ensures longer battery life
We've added a function that automatically turns off the power even, if you leave the unit with the power on. Since this function works by detecting operations or audio signals within a certain length of time (30 minutes), it has absolutely no effect on normal use. This feature further enhances the convenience of the amPlug.

amPlug is the most convenient way to play
With the amPlug providing up to 17 hours of battery-powered operation, you'll be able to play anytime and anywhere. Since there's no need for a guitar cable, it's a great way of practicing at home, or warming up before a live performance or while on tour. Also, there's an AUX in jack for your MP3 player, so you can jam along with your favorite songs.

Highlights
No need for a guitar cable! Plug it directly into your guitar; the latest version of this headphone guitar amp is the fastest way to get authentic amplifier sound.
The fully-analog circuit has been totally reworked for an even clearer and more present sound!
"Classic Rock" delivers the classic crunch of a UK-made 100W amp.
Each model provides three amp modes, giving you even more variety.
Nine selectable effects (Chorus x 3, Delay x 3, Reverb x 3) are built into the guitar-type models.
A multi-stage gain circuit featuring VOX's proprietary analog technology perfectly reproduces the complex distortion created by a vacuum tube amplifier.
New folding plug mechanism rotates 180 degrees to fit any guitar
Play anytime, anywhere with up to 17 hours of battery life
Use the AUX input to jam along with your smartphone, tablet, or MP3 player

Features

  • Modes: MidBoost Off/1/2
  • Effects: Chorus 1/2/3, Delay 1/2/3, Reverb 1/2/3
  • Headphone Out
  • AUX In
  • Battery Life:
  • amPlug 2 AC30/ amPlug 2 Metal / amPlug 2 Classic Rock:
  • 11 hours (With alkaline batteries, FX on)
  • 17 hours (With alkaline batteries, FX off)
  • 4 hours (With zinc-carbon batteries, FX on)
  • 9 hours (With zinc-carbon batteries, FX off)
  • Dimensions: 86 x 80 x 31 mm / 3.39" x 3.15" x 1.22"
  • Weight: 40 g / 1.41 oz. (excluding batteries)
  • Accessories: two AAA alkaline batteries

Cool !  So Metal or Classic Rock … hmmmmm

I was surprised at how great this sounds, especially with the gain pegged and with my bridge pickup.  Lots of fun features, too.  And at that price, you can get both the metal or classic rock. 

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