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Excellent article on the Gase Offense from 2015


Jet_Engine1

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From West Coast spacing concepts (likely learned during his time with Steve Mariucci) to Air Coryell vertical concepts (likely learned during his time with Mike Martz) to the route combinations and principles that have defined Manning’s career — mesh, levels, verticals – they’re all in Gase’s playbook.

....

What stands out about Gase is his ability to create ideal matchups for his best weapons, the self-scouting measures he takes to introduce wrinkles into base concepts and his willingness to reinvent the offense out of necessity.

See I like that a lot... If you found a similar article on someone like McCarthy the quote would be "He runs a straight west coast offense".

No idea how successful it'll be but this is the kind of playbook that you need today. Air raids, pre-snap movement, west coast spacing, bunch formations...

 

 

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Very cool.  Thanks for digging this up.

As I read through how Gase deployed the clear-out routes, how he exploits matchups and how he can do it out of so many alignments (Julius Thomas in-line, 3 point stance, etc.) I really start to think about how much more Gase might be able to get out of our current guys.  We certainly don't have Pro Bowlers on offense but Robby running verticals and guys with size and speed like Enunwa and Herndon could be big assets for someone like Gase.  One more WR might do the trick for the Jets personnel in the passing game.   A better pass-catching RB (cough...Bell....cough) wouldn't be bad either.

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3 minutes ago, DMan77 said:

See I like that a lot... If you found a similar article on someone like McCarthy the quote would be "He runs a straight west coast offense".

No idea how successful it'll be but this is the kind of playbook that you need today. Air raids, pre-snap movement, west coast spacing, bunch formations...

 

 

McCarthy would show up at Florham Park on Day 1 and walk into his first offensive meeting handing out a playbook that was printed in 2011.

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2 minutes ago, jetstream23 said:

Very cool.  Thanks for digging this up.

As I read through how Gase deployed the clear-out routes, how he exploits matchups and how he can do it out of so many alignments (Julius Thomas in-line, 3 point stance, etc.) I really start to think about how much more Gase might be able to get out of our current guys.  We certainly don't have Pro Bowlers on offense but Robby running verticals and guys with size and speed like Enunwa and Herndon could be big assets for someone like Gase.  One more WR might do the trick for the Jets personnel in the passing game.   A better pass-catching RB (cough...Bell....cough) wouldn't be bad either.

Ya exactly. He throws wrinkles at different looks at the defenses. They can't get comfortable... That doesn't mean it always works, of course, but the concepts are there to keep defenses on their toes a little... The days of being able to grind out a game with a single offensive style are gone for now.

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16 minutes ago, jetstream23 said:

Very cool.  Thanks for digging this up.

As I read through how Gase deployed the clear-out routes, how he exploits matchups and how he can do it out of so many alignments (Julius Thomas in-line, 3 point stance, etc.) I really start to think about how much more Gase might be able to get out of our current guys.  We certainly don't have Pro Bowlers on offense but Robby running verticals and guys with size and speed like Enunwa and Herndon could be big assets for someone like Gase.  One more WR might do the trick for the Jets personnel in the passing game.   A better pass-catching RB (cough...Bell....cough) wouldn't be bad either.

I want Kelvin Harmon from NC state Soooooo Bad. Dude is a Michael Thomas//JuJu Clone.

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Durkin’s Playbook: Breaking Down Adam Gase’s Offensive Schemes

By Dan Durkin-

(CBS) Of the seven teams that sought out new head coaches this offseason, none was more prolific in filling its vacancies than the Chicago Bears.

New head coach John Fox was the most experienced candidate on the market and the only new hire to have taken multiple teams to the Super Bowl. The defenses Vic Fangio coordinated in San Francisco over the past four seasons were the only ones to rank in the top five in nine different statistical categories. The offenses Adam Gase coordinated in Denver over the past two seasons were the only ones to accumulate more than a combined 10,000 yards and 1,000 points.

 

After a promising 2013 season, the Bears endured a precipitous drop in offensive production this past season, following the trend line of the Marc Trestman effect.

While fans shouldn’t expect anywhere near the same numbers Gase’s offenses generated in Denver, they should relish in the fact that one of the league’s brightest young offensive minds is now in Chicago.

Given Peyton Manning’s presence in Denver, questions exist about how much Gase impacted those team numbers, but such questions can never be quantified. The fact remains that Gase devised the game plans and called in the plays, and his exposure to Manning over the past three seasons is nothing but a benefit to his growth as a coordinator.

Looking through the Broncos’ game tape over the last two seasons affords a prism into Gase’s many influences. From West Coast spacing concepts (likely learned during his time with Steve Mariucci) to Air Coryell vertical concepts (likely learned during his time with Mike Martz) to the route combinations and principles that have defined Manning’s career — mesh, levels, verticals – they’re all in Gase’s playbook.

Denver started to accumulate some potent offensive weapons prior to Manning’s arrival. He simply became the ideal on-field orchestrator to make everything work in concert. The Broncos evolved into one of the best passing offenses in league history with astute pre-snap blitz and coverage recognition aided by formation shifts and motion, combined with fine-tuned route combinations that include rub and spacing elements which Manning threw with precise anticipation and ball location.

What stands out about Gase is his ability to create ideal matchups for his best weapons, the self-scouting measures he takes to introduce wrinkles into base concepts and his willingness to reinvent the offense out of necessity.

Let’s step inside the film room to take a closer look at Gase’s offense using All-22 coaches’ film.

Gase’s advanced scouting of opponents to understand which personnel they’ll counter with and how they’ll align to formations is one of his biggest assets.

The first example comes from the Broncos-49ers game. The Broncos come out in 11 personnel in a 3-by-2 empty set. The 49ers counter with nickel personnel in a 3-3-5 alignment with a single-high safety in Cover-1 (man-free) coverage.

By lining up wide receiver Demaryius Thomas as the No. 3 receiver (in football terms, defenses consider the receiver closest to the sidelines as the No. 1 in a formation) on the three-wide side of the field, Gase gets the exact look he anticipated. The 49ers line up linebacker Michael Wilhoite across from Thomas, which is a decided advantage for the Broncos that Manning spots immediately.

Tight end Julius Thomas (the No. 2 wide receiver) runs a vertical clear-out to occupy the free safety. On the two-receiver side, Emmanuel Sanders runs a vertical route to clear out the cornerback, while Wes Welker runs a quick hitch.

Not only does Demaryius Thomas beat Wilhoite off the snap, but the route combination creates a huge void in the intermediate area on the right side of the defense for him to settle in on an over route for an easy pitch-and-catch 32-yard completion.

The next example comes from the Broncos-Colts game. The Broncos come out in 12 personnel in a unit wing slot left formation with tight end Julius Thomas on the line in a three-point stance as the “Y” receiver. The Colts counter with base 4-3 personnel in an under front.

Once again, Gase gets the exact matchup he was seeking, as the Colts match up linebacker D’Qwell Jackson on Julius Thomas, which is another clear coverage mismatch that favors the Broncos.

The Broncos clear out with Demaryius Thomas and Sanders running vertical routes on the two-receiver side of the field. Julius Thomas beats Jackson with speed off the snap and gains inside leverage on a Y-cross/corner route into the empty void and connects on a 35-yard touchdown reception.

Under Gase, the Broncos devised a packaged series that heavily utilized wide receiver tunnel (toward the quarterback) and bubble (away from the quarterback) screens. This scheme was sometimes used off of play-action

^ wouldn’t let me post all of it because my data speed is low but here’s the jist.

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I will be thrilled if we actually see our WR's actually open in space this season. It seems like something other teams are able to accomplish regularly, but rarely us. Sam is always having to make perfect throws into windows he often creates with the throw. If he can have some wide open guys the offense is going to open right up.

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54 minutes ago, Jet_Engine1 said:

I read this the other day. Great.  Thing i wonder is:  if Peyton was so great (and he was!),  why did he not throw 55 TD passes and pass for 10000 yards in 2 years until he got to Denver?  Anti- Gasers just refuse to credit him for some of this.

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