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Can we put moratorium on hand-wringing about overpaying?


jgb

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We have most cap space in league. We couldn’t give our money away last two years. We have a FQB on a cheap rookie deal. Overpaying is the last concern any Jets fan should have. Now is exactly when you should pay a premium to surround our cheap FQB with talent. Yes building through the draft is ideal but we have failed—even if we do have a great draft this year. Time to chase some marquee FAs. It’s either that or save Johnson a bunch of money and squander another season of Sam’s development, forfeiting the season in the process. Penny wise, pound foolish.

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2 hours ago, jgb said:

We have most cap space in league. We couldn’t give our money away last two years. We have a FQB on a cheap rookie deal. Overpaying is the last concern any Jets fan should have. Now is exactly when you should pay a premium to surround our cheap FQB with talent. Yes building through the draft is ideal but we have failed—even if we do have a great draft this year. Time to chase some marquee FAs. It’s either that or save Johnson a bunch of money and squander another season of Sam’s development, forfeiting the season in the process. Penny wise, pound foolish.

We HAVE to overpay this year or watch the FA train pass us by this year. There are 20 teams with really good-great cap space and most are playoff teams or more attractive destinations than the dysfunctional Jets.

The FA pool isn’t great and anyone that is worth signing will surely be resigned or tagged since most teams have a lot of cap space. Prepare for a really disappointing offseason. It’s Mac’s fault that we are in this situation but it won’t be his fault if he can only sign 1 “marquee” player and overpay some “meh” guys. 

I see all these crazy/unrealistic wish lists all over the internet for/by Jet fans and feel that many fans will be setting themselves up for disappointment. We are in really bad shape as a team and the only thing that can fix that are some great drafts. We draft poorly so I wouldn’t count on that unless we had change to our front office. So here we are.... 7-9 here we come!

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That cap room will go awfully quick.  We only have about 30 players of consequence under contract in 2019, with 36 pending free agents.  So, no, there shouldn't be a moratorium on complaining about overpaying.  It is essential that Maccagnan spend the money wisely and avoid making it rain on 1-2 guys. 

Overpay a couple free agents and we won't be able to field a competitive roster, and people will be whining about Gase not calling the good plays to get Phillip Dorsett open. 

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30 minutes ago, Pac said:

More Maccwhining and dire predictions.  This is going to be a long wait till March.

I just said that I can’t blame him for not having a great FA. I’m blaming unrealistic fan expectations. I fully blame him for the state of the roster to this point. If given a clean slate, his back is against the wall was my point.

Any good GM would have difficulty with our situation this offseason which I’ve said many times. That’s not a knock on Mac at all. In fact, I’m defending the reality of how difficult of a situation he is in regardless of if it’s his fault or not. 

Sorry you are so sensitive about Mac making mistakes and instantly shutdown and not comprehend what you are reading the second you see something critical yet factual about Mac. It’s true that Mac is responsible for our roster. I don’t know what else to tell you. I’m also defending him in a way because of this difficult task this offseason.

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unused cap space is like the money you leave on the gift card

besides the actual 100 bucks or whatever you aren't spending 

there's the opportunity cost, the interest, etc 

which is bull on 100 bucks but think about the interest on 17 mil under last year or 100 mil under right now 

it adds up 

 

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Free Agency requires overpaying.  It is the nature of the beast -- suppply and demand and all that fun sh*t we learned about in Economics 101.  So few impact players make it to FA, and when an above average player makes it, with multiple teams bidding, the end result is you overpay.  We have a lot of cap space; but also a lot of holes to fill on the roster.  I am really concerned about what the OL market is going to be like.  We are far from the only team that will be looking for a starter or two, and all these wish lists are crazy: Matt Paradis, Trent Brown, Mitch Morse -- guys like that will have multiple suitors.  We are going to have to overpay to bring some guys in, and if we are lucky, we will hit on one elite guy -- it is what it is. 

Just have to hope the guys we do pay big $$ to end up having an impact.  Win games next year and there won't be complaining.  Spend $100M for another double digit losing season, and there will be plenty of justified bitching and moaning.

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1 hour ago, Jetsfan80 said:

That cap room will go awfully quick.  We only have about 30 players of consequence under contract in 2019, with 36 pending free agents.  So, no, there shouldn't be a moratorium on complaining about overpaying.  It is essential that Maccagnan spend the money wisely and avoid making it rain on 1-2 guys. 

Overpay a couple free agents and we won't be able to field a competitive roster, and people will be whining about Gase not calling the good plays to get Phillip Dorsett open. 

The Jets roster is currently awful, yet they managed to be in most games, even with a rookie QB.

This league comes down to playmakers - impact plays at key moments.  That's how you win in the NFL.

The Jets are full of Jags - add two or three legitimate playmakers to even the Jets current roster and you've all of sudden become a team that can challenge for a playoff spot.

The Jets can afford to "overpay"  a couple of impact guys and still upgrade the roster with better role players.

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4 hours ago, jgb said:

We have most cap space in league. We couldn’t give our money away last two years. We have a FQB on a cheap rookie deal. Overpaying is the last concern any Jets fan should have. Now is exactly when you should pay a premium to surround our cheap FQB with talent. Yes building through the draft is ideal but we have failed—even if we do have a great draft this year. Time to chase some marquee FAs. It’s either that or save Johnson a bunch of money and squander another season of Sam’s development, forfeiting the season in the process. Penny wise, pound foolish.

Overpaying is what NFL after agency is all about. I know you can find diamonds in the rough but generally speaking - you have to overpay for FA (mostlybc of your teams inability to draft very well).

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42 minutes ago, Warfish said:

Like who?

Start with Bell and go from there. You probably have to bid on 4-5 guys for every one you land. Jets should cast a pretty wide net. And I think they will. Macc knows the flames are working their way from his feet up his legs.

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25 minutes ago, JetFreak89 said:

Overpaying is quite literally the price we pay for not being able to draft well. 

To secure a FA's services you have to be willing to pay more than anyone else. By strict definition, every FA ever was an "overpay."

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9 minutes ago, FidelioJet said:

The Jets roster is currently awful, yet they managed to be in most games, even with a rookie QB.

This league comes down to playmakers - impact plays at key moments.  That's how you win in the NFL.

The Jets are full of Jags - add two or three legitimate playmakers to even the Jets current roster and you've all of sudden become a team that can challenge for a playoff spot.

The Jets can afford to "overpay"  a couple of impact guys and still upgrade the roster with better role players.

Exactly! You look at the Chiefs offensive roster, Hill, Kelsey are the engines that make it go after Mahomes. Herndons no Kelsey but he's pretty damn good, add Bell in the backfield, 1 more WR, fix the Oline & boom, upgrade.

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4 hours ago, sourceworx said:

If we did, @Sperm Edwards would have nothing to post about. LOL.

lol

Seriously, I'm happy to pay for offense, especially while we're breaking in a young QB (or in recent years, were looking for one to break in). Instead we pissed it away on dead-end veterans that didn't further that goal. They wanted an all pro  guard last year? Explain to me why he's worth a $13MM offer but not a $15MM offer when the team saved up crazy money in a tank season. This is what it was saved for, and we were still behaving as though we only had a couple bucks left. 

Throwing $10MM at a backup QB and then getting outbid on a long term guard - even worse, when an additional chunk would have been cleared by cutting Carpenter - is a bass ackwards way of doing things. Pay him $10MM to be the QBC for all I care. But on the cap it should be towards developing a QB properly to have a realistic 15+ year window thereafter when every temporary bit of cap stupidity is long gone. That means find guards, centers, tackles, serious RBs and WRs. It means keeping it in your pants instead of drooling about "value" for a 34DE or a safety or this past season yet another 34DE in round 3. 

I wanted them to extend Enunwa back when his contract value would have been in the $5-6MM/yr range. Some gloriously howled at the wisdom of sitting on our hands and giving it to those with no future here when he injured his neck, only to then tout the wisdom of signing him (while injured again) at $9MM/year with $20MM in guaranteed money. I'm in favor of doing it now with Robby because it's obvious they're going to extend him later on anyway. There'd be a slight (not enormous) discount over going rate for getting paid a year early, but the extra savings would also be locking him up before another year of league-wide inflation. Roughly Enunwa's money now would get it done (give or take; he doesn't have Enunwa's leverage). Next year it could easily be 30-50% more than that to lock him up if Darnold progresses as we all hope.

In FA I'm hoping they don't get too cute again on OL in FA because the truth is they could do with upgrades at all 5 positions. That's unfortunately unrealistic because of the situation the team has been put into, but upgrade what we can and make sure players are drafted now & next year to create a pipeline to take over when that guaranteed $ is over, instead of waiting for it to be over and then treating the draft like it's free agency part II. 

As you can see, I'll always have something to post about. ;) 

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The Jets need to overpay for FA's for two reasons:

1 - the Jets are generally not a hot destination or FA's at the moment (even with Darnold at QB) and usually have to pony up the most money to attract a FA.  

2 - The team has a young QB who had a decent rookie campaign with ZERO weapons around him.  They need to bring in as many playmakers as possible for him, and that's going to cost money, so they can't and shouldn't get outbid by anyone given their cap space situation.

  

 

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46 minutes ago, FidelioJet said:

The Jets roster is currently awful, yet they managed to be in most games, even with a rookie QB.

This league comes down to playmakers - impact plays at key moments.  That's how you win in the NFL.

Our net points were -108.  4th-worst in the league.  We are not 1-2 "impact players" away.  That's a dangerous assertion to make and one I hope the front office does not agree with.

And I only just noticed we hired as HC the guy whose team was even worse (-114) in that category. 

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3 minutes ago, Beerfish said:

Not one person is worried about over paying for really good players.

We are all worried about over paying for slugs and lousy players.

It is okay to over pay as long as you do not over term and have a way of getting out from under contracts.

If the players produce up to their contracts, by definition, we did not overpay in that instance.

And if the players produce and aren't firmly on the wrong side of 30 (we shouldn't be signing guys that old to begin with), we should not be worried about getting out of those contracts quickly. 

That's only a good thing to have if you sign guys that under-perform, like Macc has brought in time and again (yet somehow still gets praised because the contracts had an "out"). 

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What with a sophomore FQB and an upgrade at HC (who is putting together a good CS) the Jets ought to be seen as an ok FA destination.  So perhaps we won't have to overpay AS MUCH as before to get the guys we want.

I'm a Jets fan so hope springs eternal.    

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20 minutes ago, Jetsfan80 said:

Our net points were -108.  4th-worst in the league.  We are not 1-2 "impact players" away.  That's a dangerous assertion to make and one I hope the front office does not agree with.

And I only just noticed we hired as HC the guy whose team was even worse (-114) in that category. 

I disagree.

First off, 6 of the 12 Jets losses were 1 score games - and many of the others got away from them in the 4th quarter.

I did not say they are a Super Bowl contender next year - but they can absolutely compete for a playoff spot with a 2nd year Darnold, adding two or three impact players and upgrading the role players.

Look at 3 of the last 4 games of the season.  I saw a team that can absolutely compete with quality teams. 

The NFL is a funny thing - you can turn around a team very quickly.

Upgrade at Center and T, add Bell, add a solid WR and an edge rusher (doesn't have to be spectacular) - all of which we can afford.  

And this team ABSOLUTELY has the talent to compete for a playoff spot - and it should.

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1 hour ago, Warfish said:

Like who?

Ranking the Top NFL Free Agents in the 2019 Class

CHRIS ROLINGJANUARY 21, 2019

 

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Michael Wyke/Associated Press

The 2019 NFL free-agent class is a top-heavy affair dominated by defenders. 

And like the league's constantly evolving defenses, the class itself should only keep morphing in the coming months as teams dole out tags and players put ink to contracts. 

But for now, the full-blown class is worth a raise of the eyebrow. A pair of potential Hall of Famers sits in the top three, while defenders who can apply pressure on passers from all angles and downs make up most of the top 10. 

A combination of positional skill, importance to their units, age, injury history and estimated dollar amount if a bidding war erupts or a tag goes out factor into the equation. 

These are the top 10 names (and a few runners-up) about to hit the market.

    

Honorable Mentions

1 OF 11

 

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Nick Wass/Associated Press

C.J. Mosley, LB, Baltimore Ravens: Inside thumpers don't get the splashy headlines anymore. But Mosley could be the next great Baltimore Ravens linebacker. He's only 26, superb on the field and a vocal leader, making him one of the best in his class. 

Tyrann Mathieu, S, Houston Texans: Fresh off delivering big on a one-year deal, Mathieu should cash in on a major pact. He is also just 26 years old and one of the league's better defensive backs. 

Lamarcus Joyner, S, Los Angeles Rams: Joyner wasn't a major star in 2018, but his long history of versatility makes him an intriguing option. He has star potential in the right situation. 

Golden Tate, WR, Philadelphia Eagles: One of the top wideouts in the class also happens to be one of the most underrated. Tate is reliable on the field, hardly misses time and has plenty left in the tank at 30 years old. 

Teddy Bridgewater, QB, New Orleans Saints: Bridgewater is the headliner of a weak quarterback class. That isn't meant to discredit him—Bridgewater is still only 26 and seems well past his devastating 2016 knee injury, meaning he still has upside as a starter. 

Nick Foles, QB, Philadelphia Eagles: Foles could be a free agent, but that hinges on the outcome of his mutual option with the Eagles. If he does become available, he'd be the top free-agent quarterback on the market. 

10. Landon Collins, S, New York Giants

2 OF 11

 

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Chris Szagola/Associated Press

Scarcity of high-level safety play is one of the bigger reasons the New York Giants' Landon Collins sits in the top 10. 

That isn't meant to knock Collins. While he has regressed slightly numberswise since 2016, when he posted 125 total tackles and five interceptions (both career highs), he is still only 25 years old and missed four games a season ago. 

And though the draft has produced some superb safety prospects lately—with Derwin James and Jessie Bates leading the charge in 2018—guys who can patrol everywhere and keep up with today's passing attacks are still rare. 

For his part, Collins wants to stick with the Giants—even if that means playing under the franchise tag.

"Would I play on it? I got no choice but to play on it," Collins said, according to Tom Rock of Newsday. "But it's not a big concern of mine. I know what I'm capable of. Hopefully we can work something out before that, but if not, franchise it is. I'd just have to continue proving myself."

If Collins does slip to the market, the long line of bidders and final numbers on the contract he inks will say it all. The combination of proven statistics and remaining upside at a critical position are too important to pass up. 

9. Dee Ford, LB, Kansas City Chiefs

3 OF 11

 

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Jeff Haynes/Associated Press

Kansas City Chiefs pass-rusher Dee Ford is a risky player with upside and is about to make boatloads of cash—and he won't be the last on this list to fit that description. 

Pressure is king in the NFL, so the fact that Ford had 25 sacks over his last three seasons despite missing 11 games (mostly because of a back injury) will have teams kicking and elbowing to the front of the line. 

After all, Ford is only 27 years old, and over those three years, he's hit double-digit sacks twice. And it's not like he's slowing down: according to NFL.com's Next Gen Stats, Ford's strip-sack in the divisional round against the Indianapolis Colts was his 11th turnover-creating pressure of the season. 

Ford is a clear candidate for a franchise tag. That would let the Chiefs see if he can stay on the field for another full season before they agree to a long-term pact. 

Should Ford enter the market fray, he would likely end up with one of the bigger contracts of the top 10, even though he's not a big name. Teams won't hold back in light of his upside and ability to change games.

8. Ezekiel Ansah, DE, Detroit Lions

4 OF 11

 

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Rick Scuteri/Associated Press

Ezekiel Ansah is another massive risk. 

After Ansah's 12-sack campaign in 2017, the Detroit Lions hit the 2013 top-five pick with a franchise tag and only got four sacks over seven games. 

Not that this was any surprise to Detroit. Though flashing almost unlimited upside, Ansah had ankle and shoulder issues in 2016 and knee and back issues in 2017. The aforementioned 12 sacks don't look as great when you consider nine of those came over just three games. 

And yet, we are talking about a top-five pick who doesn't turn 30 years old until May. If he can get his body right, Ansah could get back to being the guy who once recorded 14.5 sacks in a season, which also happens to be the last time he played in a full 16 games (2015). 

Maybe Ansah will never be that guy again. But his ability in a key area will have teams opening the checkbooks once some of the names ranked above him sign.

7. Trey Flowers, DE, New England Patriots

5 OF 11

 

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Charles Krupa/Associated Press

Trey Flowers might be the least recognizable name on the list, which is fitting given his workmanlike duties with the New England Patriots under Bill Belichick

Flowers, 25, is a nice fourth-round success story who sets the edge well against the run, plays multiple spots and can get after quarterbacks. Not only has Flowers recorded 21 sacks over the last three seasons—with no fewer than 6.5 during a campaign—he also notched 65 total pressures over the last two years, per Pro Football Focus

It's unclear how much the market will pay for his services. His numbers are good, and the roles he plays are even better, but sometimes the speed-rushers who do little else get the bigger contracts. 

Maybe that will cause Flowers to remain with the Patriots. Maybe not. But he's a budding and a cornerstone, which will be true no matter where he ends up.

6. Frank Clark, DE, Seattle Seahawks

6 OF 11

 

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Michael Ainsworth/Associated Press

Speaking of 25-year-old quarterback-nightmares personified, Frank Clark is on his way to market if the Seattle Seahawks don't do something about it. 

Clark posted a career-high 13 sacks in 2018, meaning he has 35 over four seasons and, throwing out his rookie year, a stellar 32 over three seasons. That's consistency few can claim—both on this list and among pass-rushers overall. 

To make it all the more impressive, Clark says elbow issues meant he only played at 60 percent this past season, per Bob Condotta of the Seattle Times. That same report says the Seahawks and their star end have been talking about a new contract, too. 

Clark's financial outlook is fantastic regardless of his elbows. Presumably, he'll regress. But given how his last three seasons have unfolded—never mind the fact that Seattle lost most of the big names around him while he exploded—the regression should be tiny.

5. Jadeveon Clowney, LB, Houston Texans

7 OF 11

 

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Michael Wyke/Associated Press

Jadeveon Clowney at one point looked like a risky investment. 

The pass-rusher had microfracture surgery on his right knee in December 2014. He followed it up with a knee operation last offseason, and both procedures made his outlook regarding a second NFL contract cloudy

Yet here we are 15 games and nine sacks later. 

Clowney has 29 sacks over 62 contests and will turn 26 years old in February. The 2014 No. 1 overall pick looks like a prime franchise tag candidate for the Houston Texans, yet the front office has plenty of other contracts to worry about this offseason and only so much cap space

Open market or otherwise, Clowney's strong attendance rate over the past four seasons combined with his productivity means he will land one of the bigger pass-rusher contracts in league history. Teams won't hesitate to throw something like three years plus an option for a fourth on the table, carrying him into another chance at a major payday around age 30. 

And deservedly so, as few can match his game-changing upside.

4. Demarcus Lawrence, DE, Dallas Cowboys

8 OF 11

 

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Ron Jenkins/Associated Press

Demarcus Lawrence played well under the franchise tag, regressing slightly to 10.5 sacks from 14.5 in 2017. But it isn't enough of a dip for teams to care much, and it's only one stat. 

The 26-year-old provides game-altering pressure, and the market will likely prioritize Lawrence over any other pass-rusher because of his lack of a serious injury history, budding consistency and remaining upside. For context, he's pressured quarterbacks 142 times over the last two seasons, per PFF

The Dallas Cowboys might let him get away if they don't slap another tag on him. With long-term contract concerns such as quarterback Dak Prescott and wide receiver Amari Cooper on the table, the team could consider saving cash and spending a draft asset on a committee approach to replace Lawrence's production. 

Wherever he lands, Lawrence seems the safest bet on this list to keep consistently hitting double-digit sack production, which would justify a steep asking price.

3. Le'Veon Bell, RB, Pittsburgh Steelers

9 OF 11

 

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Phelan M Ebenhack/Associated Press

It isn't often a potential Hall of Famer makes it to the open market in the middle of his prime, but nothing about Le'Veon Bell's situation is normal. 

Bell's refusal to report to the Pittsburgh Steelers in a season-long holdout is about as unique as his running style. Many have tried to emulate it since he entered the league in 2013, yet few can match his skills.

NFL.com's Chris Wesseling explained it best: "Bell succeeds with a sixth sense, bypassing vanishing holes in favor of ones that have yet to open. He harbors implicit trust in his offensive line, believing that a potential crease will materialize even as unexpected flashes of color threaten to shut it down."

The proof is there. Bell has had a trio of 1,200-plus rushing-yard seasons, and he's scored eight or more rushing touchdowns in three of his five campaigns. Keep in mind he only appeared in six games in 2015. He's rushed for 291 first downs on 1,229 attempts and averaged 4.3 yards per carry. 

While we're at it, he's also tallied 2,660 yards as a receiver on 312 catches and averaged a superb 8.5 yards per grab. 

Keep in mind Bell has had a year away to heal and will only turn 27 in February. While plenty of running backs can run well, few can change an offense the way he does. In fact, the only thing stopping him from ranking No. 1 outright is the state of his position. 

2. Grady Jarrett, DT, Atlanta Falcons

10 OF 11

 

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Joe Robbins/Getty Images

Edge pressure is great. 

Interior pressure is even better. 

And Grady Jarrett could be a household name by the end of free agency. He has improved every year since he entered the NFL via the fifth round in 2015, registering 10 of his 14 career sacks over the past two seasons with the Atlanta Falcons. He created 135 pressures last year alone, per PFF. 

Talent like Grady's, who's set in the Aaron Donald mold, is still rare, and it changes the complexion of an entire defense. As opposed to coaches needing to send extra guys on the blitz, such a player leaves more bodies to defend against the pass. And that unorthodox pressure up the middle isn't something quarterbacks have to deal with often.

Not only is it hard to throw over the head of a backpedaling offensive lineman, but getting flushed left or right into the waiting arms of defensive ends stings just as much. 

In short, Jarrett is a rare commodity and does his job better than most. He is only 25 years old, and there's a chance he hasn't reached his ceiling yet, so teams will pay for both his remaining potential alongside the unique productivity. 

1. Earl Thomas, S, Seattle Seahawks

11 OF 11

 

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Elaine Thompson/Associated Press

Remember the scarcity chat regarding Collins? Apply it to surefire Hall of Famer Earl Thomas

Thomas has spent most of his career as the NFL's premier safety, and it would be easier to list what he doesn't do well than what he does. But mostly, his brilliant ability to diagnose what an offense is doing and use elite range to create turnovers is Ed Reed-esque.

Traditional stats don't tell the whole story regarding Thomas, whose sheer skill at a position that isn't as highly valued as others is unique. But his 664 tackles, 10 forced fumbles and 28 interceptions since he joined the league in 2010 don't hurt. 

Neither did a deep dive from ForbesMatt Ufford, who illustrated how many high-level safeties haven't suffered ill effects after turning 30: 

From age 28 to age 34, Ed Reed posted seven consecutive seasons with an AV of at least 11, leading the league in picks at age 30 and 32. Starting at age 31, Brian Dawkins finished with an AV of 10 or more in five of the next six seasons. John Lynch finished a Hall of Fame career with the Bucs by age 32, then signed with the Broncos and made four straight Pro Bowls. Even [Troy] Polamalu, whose career declined more quickly than many of these all-time greats, posted an AV of nine in his penultimate season, at age 32.

NFL teams have this data and more, so Thomas' standing as the top free agent isn't in dispute. He'll turn 30 in May, and while he missed seven games over the two seasons before he broke his leg in 2018, past data points at the position and Thomas' skill make him a player every team should covet.

            

Free-agent data and contract info courtesy of Spotrac. Stats courtesy of ESPN.

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1 hour ago, Sperm Edwards said:

lol

Seriously, I'm happy to pay for offense, especially while we're breaking in a young QB (or in recent years, were looking for one to break in). Instead we pissed it away on dead-end veterans that didn't further that goal. They wanted an all pro  guard last year? Explain to me why he's worth a $13MM offer but not a $15MM offer when the team saved up crazy money in a tank season. This is what it was saved for, and we were still behaving as though we only had a couple bucks left. 

Throwing $10MM at a backup QB and then getting outbid on a long term guard - even worse, when an additional chunk would have been cleared by cutting Carpenter - is a bass ackwards way of doing things. Pay him $10MM to be the QBC for all I care. But on the cap it should be towards developing a QB properly to have a realistic 15+ year window thereafter when every temporary bit of cap stupidity is long gone. That means find guards, centers, tackles, serious RBs and WRs. It means keeping it in your pants instead of drooling about "value" for a 34DE or a safety or this past season yet another 34DE in round 3. 

I wanted them to extend Enunwa back when his contract value would have been in the $5-6MM/yr range. Some gloriously howled at the wisdom of sitting on our hands and giving it to those with no future here when he injured his neck, only to then tout the wisdom of signing him (while injured again) at $9MM/year with $20MM in guaranteed money. I'm in favor of doing it now with Robby because it's obvious they're going to extend him later on anyway. There'd be a slight (not enormous) discount over going rate for getting paid a year early, but the extra savings would also be locking him up before another year of league-wide inflation. Roughly Enunwa's money now would get it done (give or take; he doesn't have Enunwa's leverage). Next year it could easily be 30-50% more than that to lock him up if Darnold progresses as we all hope.

In FA I'm hoping they don't get too cute again on OL in FA because the truth is they could do with upgrades at all 5 positions. That's unfortunately unrealistic because of the situation the team has been put into, but upgrade what we can and make sure players are drafted now & next year to create a pipeline to take over when that guaranteed $ is over, instead of waiting for it to be over and then treating the draft like it's free agency part II. 

As you can see, I'll always have something to post about. ;) 

Penny wise/pound foolish mentality is the hallmark of GMs who lack confidence. If you trust your process and identify your guy(s), then go and get them. A mill or two means nothing when you hit. Macc is the FO equivalent of Bowles: General Managing not to lose.

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29 minutes ago, FidelioJet said:

I disagree.

First off, 6 of the 12 Jets losses were 1 score games - and many of the others got away from them in the 4th quarter.

I did not say they are a Super Bowl contender next year - but they can absolutely compete for a playoff spot with a 2nd year Darnold, adding two or three impact players and upgrading the role players.

Look at 3 of the last 4 games of the season.  I saw a team that can absolutely compete with quality teams. 

The NFL is a funny thing - you can turn around a team very quickly.

Upgrade at Center and T, add Bell, add a solid WR and an edge rusher (doesn't have to be spectacular) - all of which we can afford.  

And this team ABSOLUTELY has the talent to compete for a playoff spot - and it should.

 

You can't pick and choose.  You have to take the season as a whole.  When you play a few close games and get blown out in the rest.....you suck.  You aren't "close" to getting it right. 

That was proven by the 2013-14 Jets.  We went 8-8 in 2013 and many thought we were "close", despite having -97 net points.  The next year, we went 4-12 (-118 net points).

We're 2-3 "A" and "B" players away from being like, 7-9 or 8-8.  That's not impressive!  This is a league built on parity.  The gap between a 5-win team and an 8-win team is small.  The gap between 8 wins and 11 wins is MASSIVE.

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13 minutes ago, Jetsfan80 said:

 

You can't pick and choose.  You have to take the season as a whole.  When you play a few close games and get blown out in the rest.....you suck.  You aren't "close" to getting it right. 

That was proven by the 2013-14 Jets.  We went 8-8 in 2013 and many thought we were "close", despite having -97 net points.  The next year, we went 4-12 (-118 net points).

We're 2-3 "A" and "B" players away from being like, 7-9 or 8-8.  That's not impressive!  This is a league built on parity.  The gap between a 5-win team and an 8-win team is small.  The gap between 8 wins and 11 wins is MASSIVE.

Of course each game, on its own, matters.  

Why you have to look at the individual games is that they are competitive and with a big or play or two in those games they can find a way to win.  In order to do that you need play makers.

Do you honestly believe they Jets have no chance to be competitive next year? regardless of what they do in FA and the draft. 

And you believe that because their Total Points margin was too negative?

 

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