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Sam Darnold has Mono: MERGED

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5 hours ago, AL047 said:

Did anyone on here notice that this is the second time Sam Darnold can't complete a whole season. Last season he missed games because he got hurt and now he's missing games because he contracted Mono. That's two years in a row that he misses games!!! 

I'm sorry there are no excuses, he is our QB and shouldn't be missing games in any manner. He was drafted to be our future QB and so far he is missing games in two seasons. It was said that he won't be back until after the bye week. 

If Sam Darnold misses games another season, they better look at drafting another QB!!!

Notice how he sometimes throws the ball and it hits the ground? Shocking. Worse than that, he occasionally throws it to a player in the opposing team! Why would a QB want to do that? He also has no pass-rush ability, and I have yet to see him force a single fumble by the opposition. Plus, he's been our QB for, what, 13 regular season games and NOT ONE of those games has been a Superbowl win. Unbelievable.

He takes around half of every single game off. Whenever the other team has the ball, he just chooses to walk to the sideline and SIT ON THE BENCH! Sometimes, he just sits there chatting to an older guy wearing a baseball cap and at other times he actually sits there LOOKING AT A BLUE TABLET COMPUTER!

Added to all of that, he has yet to cure cancer. I haven't even seen or heard of any effort by him to cure cancer. Just what the hell is he thinking? Shocking. All of this clearly demonstrates that either the time has come to draft a new QB, or that the time has come to outlaw the internet from the deranged.

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Love how some are acting like mono is nothing. Going out there with an enlarged spleen is like (quite literally) signing his own death warrant. 

 

QB out 4-6 weeks vs. QB dead

 

I'll take the former. 

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3 hours ago, RobR said:

Not 100% sure but I think we can still put him on IR with a designation to return. I know we currently don't have anyone taking those slots up but I'm not sure since he already played a game. If available that would be in the Jets best interest.

Yes, we can put him on IR-R. However, if you do that, you're ruling him out for at least 8 weeks. I think guys on IR-R can return to practice after 6 weeks, but can't be activated until they have missed 8 weeks.

Big decisions to come - carry Darnold on the 53 for an undetermined length of time in the hope he recovers quickly, or free up the roster spot with an IR-R move but rule your starting QB out for a minimum of 8 weeks. Tough decision.

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8 minutes ago, Maxman said:

I think the people who are saying this don't realize what it is. This is definitely an injury you can't play with. They will monitor his spleen and until that bad boy fits inside his rib cage again they won't even let him ride a bike.

I remember a few kids here and there growing up who got it. They were pretty much out of school for a month.

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The truth is: this game is purely for the country to have a prime time gasm, about the Browns. Odell  and Landry will  be a fantasy cream dream. 

They'll run Mayfield/Beckham   commercials during game. The Jets Are Just  the  unseen extra in  Storm - Trooper armor, in the background of a Star wars movie  :)

 

 

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I dont see a point in rushing him back. Let him come back in late November if needed. 

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I'm optimistic he will make it back for the eagles game. I think people on here forget that 1. He is a high level athlete and not a schlub like the rest of us and 2. He will receive around the clock care from world class doctors/training staff.

I guarantee he will be on IV's in his apartment to keep his hydration up, they've already said they're going to deliver his meals to ensure he keeps his weight up (this will be incumbent upon him as anyone who has had mono knows, you don't have an appetite and forcing yourself to eat when not hungry is brutal).

As far as the game goes, I think we will see a classic Gase Miami gameplan which will likely infuriate a lot of people on this board. I expect him to try and shorten the game, play keep away and hope to be within a score by the end of the 4Q and try to go win the game. If Mosley doesn't play, this likely won't matter as I fully expect the Browns to drop 35+. It's really a nightmare matchup, they struggle at the tackle positions and we have no edge rushers, they're strong on the outside on offense and our corners are, well our corners. The bills collectively have a nice DL, but Myles Garrett is something completely different and we saw how well we did against the bills front.

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21 hours ago, C Mart said:

via football doc

image.png.624945595790bf0c4913761a161f7d8d.png

 

and Jenny was on it too

Jenny Vrentas @JennyVrentas

If your spleen becomes enlarged, as often happens with mono, you have to avoid contact sports.

 

Jets QB Sam Darnold will miss several games due to mononucleosis, which carries enhance risk in contact sport

By PROFOOTBALLDOC

SEP. 12, 2019 9:43 AM

Jets quarterback Sam Darnold was ruled out of Mondays night’s game against the Browns due to mononucleosis.

There are long-term implications here that reach far beyond Monday.

Of course, I have not examined Darnold, nor am I privy to his medical records. This analysis is based on my experience in medicine and the NFL.

The first concern is that “mono” is highly contagious. Darnold will be isolated from the team, and the Jets will be keeping a close eye on others around the building over the next few days. Teams should (and usually do) have precautions in place, and those will be reinforced now. This is not just “the kissing disease.” Mono can be spread by close contact inherent in team atmospheres, such as shared water bottles, the football and meeting room surfaces.

The next immediate concern is the acute symptoms Darnold is dealing with, which will prevent him from playing for the foreseeable future.

Typically, the spleen and/or liver are enlarged during bouts of mono, so a person infected must stay away from contact sports due to fear of injury, including possible laceration or other damage to the spleen and/or liver, which could cause significant bleeding.

So Darnold is slated for an extended absence.

Even when the spleen and/or liver are no longer enlarged and it is safe for a return to contact, it could be months before Darnold’s energy level and general malaise have passed and he feel like he can return to practice and then play.

At this point, expect the Jets franchise quarterback is out at least until October.

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via The Athletic

What’s mononucleosis? A doctor explains the illness that’s sidelining Sam Darnold

FLORHAM PARK, N.J. — Adam Gase made one thing abundantly clear this week: He is not a doctor. The Jets coach stated that nearly a half-dozen times on Monday, Wednesday and Thursday.

So when it came to the specifics of Sam Darnold’s still-can’t-believe-this-is-true mononucleosis diagnosis, Gase wasn’t very helpful. He didn’t know how Darnold got it. He didn’t know when he got it. He didn’t know when he might be back.

Like Gase, I too am not a doctor. I didn’t even stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.

But Joshua Scott is.

So I called him.

As Scott — the primary care sports medicine physician at Cedars-Sinai Kerlan-Jobe Institute in Los Angeles — explains it, mononucleosis is an infectious disease usually caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that attacks the body’s white blood cells. It causes a host of symptoms that can include fatigue, fever, sore throat, swollen lymph nodes, a rash and swelling in the liver and spleen. The illness is most commonly contracted through the transfer of saliva. It’s nicknamed “the kissing disease” for a reason, but someone can get it by simply sharing food or drink.

Athletes can spread the virus by sharing water bottles. Most athletes get it the same ways everyone else does.

The first few weeks — which Darnold is just beginning  — are the most challenging. This is when those symptoms take their toll. Because mononucleosis is a virus, no antibiotic will make anything better. Some medicines will help with the symptoms and supportive care is key. Some believe oral steroids can ease the lymph node and throat issues, but it’s best to just wait until your body builds up the antibodies to defend itself. It’s during this time that those with mono are the most contagious. That’s why Darnold isn’t allowed around the team.

It’s common for patients to experience weight loss, Scott said, because the fatigue makes them lose their appetite. The 22-year-old Darnold, as Gase said Thursday, is already down five pounds. Scott explained that hydration is key to keeping the weight on. It’s also important to “eat smaller meals more frequently” to ensure the caloric intake doesn’t drop.

The most dangerous part of mononucleosis deals with the spleen enlargement and swelling. This is what will keep Darnold off the field. Strenuous physical activity or contact to the area could result in a rupture, which in extreme cases could lead to death. Darnold cannot take the field again until his symptoms dissipate.  And there’s no set timetable for when that will happen.

“With a contact injury, the absolute soonest I would allow an athlete to return is in three to four weeks,” Scott said. “That’s the absolute minimum to letting a professional athlete come back and play. This is an acute phase where you’re sick for one, two or three weeks, but then there’s a recovery phase that sometimes can last months. That’s the tricky thing about mono — it affects everyone different.

“It’s the enlarged spleen that you don’t want to risk. Most people who rupture their spleen do so during normal activities. (remember this is very rare). It doesn’t have to be contact sports. He could do it ironing his shirt. That’s why we recommend keeping athletes from playing any contact sport for a minimum of three weeks, then slowly work them back.”

There’s an outside chance, Scott explained, that Darnold could feel better within a week. If that were to happen, he could  resume some physical activity such as running or throwing if symptoms free. Even in those cases, though, he probably won’t play a game until that 21-day timetable is met.

Darnold’s contraction of mono isn’t anything out of the norm. He’s right in the window (14 to 24) when most get it. He avoided contracting it in college, so he got it in the pros. Scott said 90 percent of adults test positive for the antibodies by age 35. Many non-athletes who contract the disease don’t even know. They simply think they’re sick for a couple of weeks, get better, then go on with their lives.

The positive of this, Scott said, is Darnold won’t have to worry about it moving forward. Once his body creates the antibodies he’ll be good. They’ll fight off the symptoms if ever they pop up again. Only in extreme cases of mono will complications, such as nervous-system issues, pop up. That’s very rare.

“Most people will recover from this just fine,” Scott said. “The only problem would be the possibility the fatigue and other symptoms last an extended period of time. Every person is different.

“Sam sounds like he’s a healthy guy. He’s an athlete. He’ll recover from this without any long-term issues.”

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1 hour ago, C Mart said:

via The Athletic

What’s mononucleosis? A doctor explains the illness that’s sidelining Sam Darnold

FLORHAM PARK, N.J. — Adam Gase made one thing abundantly clear this week: He is not a doctor. The Jets coach stated that nearly a half-dozen times on Monday, Wednesday and Thursday.

So when it came to the specifics of Sam Darnold’s still-can’t-believe-this-is-true mononucleosis diagnosis, Gase wasn’t very helpful. He didn’t know how Darnold got it. He didn’t know when he got it. He didn’t know when he might be back.

Like Gase, I too am not a doctor. I didn’t even stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.

But Joshua Scott is.

So I called him.

As Scott — the primary care sports medicine physician at Cedars-Sinai Kerlan-Jobe Institute in Los Angeles — explains it, mononucleosis is an infectious disease usually caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that attacks the body’s white blood cells. It causes a host of symptoms that can include fatigue, fever, sore throat, swollen lymph nodes, a rash and swelling in the liver and spleen. The illness is most commonly contracted through the transfer of saliva. It’s nicknamed “the kissing disease” for a reason, but someone can get it by simply sharing food or drink.

 Athletes can spread the virus by sharing water bottles. Most athletes get it the same ways everyone else does.

The first few weeks — which Darnold is just beginning  — are the most challenging. This is when those symptoms take their toll. Because mononucleosis is a virus, no antibiotic will make anything better. Some medicines will help with the symptoms and supportive care is key. Some believe oral steroids can ease the lymph node and throat issues, but it’s best to just wait until your body builds up the antibodies to defend itself. It’s during this time that those with mono are the most contagious. That’s why Darnold isn’t allowed around the team.

It’s common for patients to experience weight loss, Scott said, because the fatigue makes them lose their appetite. The 22-year-old Darnold, as Gase said Thursday, is already down five pounds. Scott explained that hydration is key to keeping the weight on. It’s also important to “eat smaller meals more frequently” to ensure the caloric intake doesn’t drop.

The most dangerous part of mononucleosis deals with the spleen enlargement and swelling. This is what will keep Darnold off the field. Strenuous physical activity or contact to the area could result in a rupture, which in extreme cases could lead to death. Darnold cannot take the field again until his symptoms dissipate.  And there’s no set timetable for when that will happen.

“With a contact injury, the absolute soonest I would allow an athlete to return is in three to four weeks,” Scott said. “That’s the absolute minimum to letting a professional athlete come back and play. This is an acute phase where you’re sick for one, two or three weeks, but then there’s a recovery phase that sometimes can last months. That’s the tricky thing about mono — it affects everyone different.

“It’s the enlarged spleen that you don’t want to risk. Most people who rupture their spleen do so during normal activities. (remember this is very rare). It doesn’t have to be contact sports. He could do it ironing his shirt. That’s why we recommend keeping athletes from playing any contact sport for a minimum of three weeks, then slowly work them back.”

There’s an outside chance, Scott explained, that Darnold could feel better within a week. If that were to happen, he could  resume some physical activity such as running or throwing if symptoms free. Even in those cases, though, he probably won’t play a game until that 21-day timetable is met.

Darnold’s contraction of mono isn’t anything out of the norm. He’s right in the window (14 to 24) when most get it. He avoided contracting it in college, so he got it in the pros. Scott said 90 percent of adults test positive for the antibodies by age 35. Many non-athletes who contract the disease don’t even know. They simply think they’re sick for a couple of weeks, get better, then go on with their lives.

The positive of this, Scott said, is Darnold won’t have to worry about it moving forward. Once his body creates the antibodies he’ll be good. They’ll fight off the symptoms if ever they pop up again. Only in extreme cases of mono will complications, such as nervous-system issues, pop up. That’s very rare.

“Most people will recover from this just fine,” Scott said. “The only problem would be the possibility the fatigue and other symptoms last an extended period of time. Every person is different.

“Sam sounds like he’s a healthy guy. He’s an athlete. He’ll recover from this without any long-term issues.”

3-4 weeks... Not the end of the world as this forum would lead you to believe... Within that time, you could now pen in the loss @ NE and Philly... Best case he is back for Cowboys and the Jets are 1-3 with a win on Monday night or 0-4 with a loss on Monday night... 

Although schedule readers and forecasters will tell you how doomed the Jets are, I think especially Monday night they are going to put up a huge fight, and rally around Sam... 

The 2 losses that are probably inevitable are the NE, Eagles weeks as these 2 are superbowl favorites... but Cowboys can be beaten by limiting Zeke and forcing Dak to throw outside, and there defense isn't great, but the Jets will have back Copeland and Herndon by then which will help.

After the Second NE game they have an easy schedule... They still have to win them... but I say if Sam makes it back by Cowboy game or the Second NE game... they should still be able to make the playoffs... But what do I know... I am sure I will get flamed for this. 

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59 minutes ago, The Voice of Reason said:

3-4 weeks... Not the end of the world as this forum would lead you to believe... Within that time, you could now pen in the loss @ NE and Philly... Best case he is back for Cowboys and the Jets are 1-3 with a win on Monday night or 0-4 with a loss on Monday night... 

Although schedule readers and forecasters will tell you how doomed the Jets are, I think especially Monday night they are going to put up a huge fight, and rally around Sam... 

The 2 losses that are probably inevitable are the NE, Eagles weeks as these 2 are superbowl favorites... but Cowboys can be beaten by limiting Zeke and forcing Dak to throw outside, and there defense isn't great, but the Jets will have back Copeland and Herndon by then which will help.

After the Second NE game they have an easy schedule... They still have to win them... but I say if Sam makes it back by Cowboy game or the Second NE game... they should still be able to make the playoffs... But what do I know... I am sure I will get flamed for this. 

Four weeks = eagles game 

I think that’s best case 

Jags game is more likely IMO

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13 minutes ago, nico002 said:

Four weeks = eagles game 

I think that’s best case 

Jags game is more likely IMO

Browns this week

NE next week 

Bye

Eagles... 

Umm.. after eagles is 4 weeks Unless you are including the Bills game day as the start.

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7 minutes ago, The Voice of Reason said:

Browns this week

NE next week 

Bye

Eagles... 

Umm.. after eagles is 4 weeks Unless you are including the Bills game day as the start.

He was sick on Monday, so 27 days till eagles game. Essentially 4 weeks

 

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Am i missing something here?  Obviously Simien isnt great but hes 13-11 as a starting qb.  Here are some highlights:

1- From Weeks 8 to 14, Siemian was one of only three quarterbacks who averaged over 300 passing yards per game (the other two were Tom Brady and Kirk Cousins).[44] By Week 16, he averaged 300.2 passing yards in his previous six games.[43]

2- During Week 12 in a Sunday Night Footballgame against the Kansas City Chiefs, Siemian threw three touchdowns with no interceptions on 20-of-34 passing for 368 yards.

3- On September 25, 2016, Siemian became the first quarterback in NFL history to throw 300 yards and complete 4 touchdowns with no interceptions

4- The Broncos defense shut down Dallas' offense and Siemian went 22-of-32 for 231 yards, a career-high tying four touchdowns, and one interception as the Broncos blew out the Cowboys 42–17.[50] For his performance, Siemian was voted the NFL's Clutch Performer of the week and the FedEx Air Player of the week. 

 

There is a case to be made that as of right now, Simien is a better qb then sam darnold.  Now obviously sam has a ceiling that simien doesnt but as of monday night, Simien is probably the better qb.  Get excited jet fans.  Simien has done things in this league darnold has never done.  I expect a big win by the Simien led jets monday night.

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11 hours ago, Jet9 said:

I remember a few kids here and there growing up who got it. They were pretty much out of school for a month.

I had it a few years back. Ended up giving it to my new girlfriend before I knew I had it. She was completely asymptomatic for about two years, and then she got an enlarged spleen. She's fine now, but both of our immune systems are trashed. Guess that's what I get for messing with the trashy girlfriend before her. 

 

Now, I'm pretty sure that the large majority of 25+ adults end up getting mono, but most never realize it because they're asymptomatic. 

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It’d be pretty amazing to find the hosehound that gave Sam mono. She (or he) would be a NY sports icon right away.

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I hadn’t heard about the Jets naming a backup for Monday night. I checked the roster and Luke Falk still listed on PS. But saw on Pro Football Talk site a quote from Gase saying it’ll be Falk. 

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4 minutes ago, Rangers9 said:

I hadn’t heard about the Jets naming a backup for Monday night. I checked the roster and Luke Falk still listed on PS. But saw on Pro Football Talk site a quote from Gase saying it’ll be Falk. 

He said he will be brought up at some point... My guess is they are waiting till the last minute so that whoever they cut doesn't get picked up for this weekends games.

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In all seriousness how was the initial diagnosis strep? Can’t they run a strep test in 5 minutes and know if you have it or not? 

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11 hours ago, Hackenberg said:

They'll run Mayfield/Beckham   commercials during game. The Jets Are Just  the  unseen extra in  Storm - Trooper armor, in the background of a Star wars movie  :)

 

 

And we all know how useless and inaccurate those stormtroopers are ... ;-)

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4 minutes ago, Matt39 said:

In all seriousness how was the initial diagnosis strep? Can’t they run a strep test in 5 minutes and know if you have it or not? 

another absurdity.  they probably saw swollen tonsils and fever and assumed it was that w/o tests, then probably looked closer at all his symptoms including the weight loss and did a blood test.

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Quote

As Scott — the primary care sports medicine physician at Cedars-Sinai Kerlan-Jobe Institute in Los Angeles — explains it, mononucleosis is an infectious disease usually caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that attacks the body’s white blood cells. It causes a host of symptoms that can include fatigue, fever, sore throat, swollen lymph nodes, a rash and swelling in the liver and spleen. The illness is most commonly contracted through the transfer of saliva. It’s nicknamed “the kissing disease” for a reason, but someone can get it by simply sharing food or drink.

Athletes can spread the virus by sharing water bottles. Most athletes get it the same ways everyone else does.

Sam licks his fingers, like most QBs, before most snaps.  Then he touches the football.  Then he throws it to other guys who catch the football and end up with the saliva.  Jamison Crowder with his 17 targets.....yeah....whoa!

 

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8 minutes ago, Matt39 said:

In all seriousness how was the initial diagnosis strep? Can’t they run a strep test in 5 minutes and know if you have it or not? 

I’m a suspicious dude by nature, but something is weird about this. Gase is really good at lying to the media (see: Jachai Polite; Mike Maccagnan; Quincy Enunwa, etc), and they’ve been all kinds of evasive on this front. 

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3 minutes ago, T0mShane said:

I’m a suspicious dude by nature, but something is weird about this. Gase is really good at lying to the media (see: Jachai Polite; Mike Maccagnan; Quincy Enunwa, etc), and they’ve been all kinds of evasive on this front. 

seems like a simple Mets-esque misdiagnosis.  swollen tonsils, sore throat, they assumed strep at first.  sometimes my kids have it even if the rapid strep is negative and are treated accordingly.  

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3 minutes ago, T0mShane said:

I’m a suspicious dude by nature, but something is weird about this. Gase is really good at lying to the media (see: Jachai Polite; Mike Maccagnan; Quincy Enunwa, etc), and they’ve been all kinds of evasive on this front. 

I mean isnt that the first thing they test for when you go to the doctor/urgent care if you have a sore throat? Antibiotics vs rest if it's flu/mono. I cant imagine an NFL teams medical staff botched this. 

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Stupid question - Can't they do a simple ultrasound or other scan to measure the spleen and determine if it's enlarged?  Scans are done all the time to measure organs, to measure tumor sizes, etc.

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11 hours ago, Hackenberg said:

The truth is: this game is purely for the country to have a prime time gasm, about the Browns. Odell  and Landry will  be a fantasy cream dream. 

They'll run Mayfield/Beckham   commercials during game. The Jets Are Just  the  unseen extra in  Storm - Trooper armor, in the background of a Star wars movie  :)

 

 

some truth here

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7 minutes ago, T0mShane said:

I’m a suspicious dude by nature, but something is weird about this. Gase is really good at lying to the media (see: Jachai Polite; Mike Maccagnan; Quincy Enunwa, etc), and they’ve been all kinds of evasive on this front. 

I think the evasiveness is that there's a wide window on his potential return.  As even the experts have said, mono affects each person differently.  At best, he fights it off quickly and we're looking at 3-4 weeks.  But for some people it could be what, 5? 6 weeks?

It's cliche but I think we'll only know when we know.

Let's not forget that an 6+ week issue makes him a candidate for IR....and that might still be a consideration.  BUT, if they're going to do that they'd want to do it immediately...to start that clock ticking.  If they wait for 3 weeks and it looks like he'll be a 6-week kind of patient then you don't put him on IR then.

Bottom line - I don't think they're lying to us.  They've said Mono and if they've shared that diagnosis I'd be 100% shocked if he has something other than Mono.  But we'll see.

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5 hours ago, Larz said:

Still can’t believe this is true

Same, man. And some people are saying he may never be the same? I don’t believe that but I’m not a doctor. I guess we will have to wait and see. 

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