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Losmeister

Lombardi @ Athletic re: NYJ ownership

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I am a Gary Vaynerchuk fan myself.

 

 

From the GM’s Eye: Years of mistakes brought the Jets to this new low point. How does their CEO move forward?

Sam-Darnold-sacked-1024x682.jpg
By Michael Lombardi 1h agocomment-icon@2x.png 11 save-icon@2x.png

New York Jets CEO Christoper Johnson thought last week was terrible? That 29-15 Week 8 loss to the Jaguars looks like a trip to Disney compared to Sunday’s disastrous 26-18 loss to the (no longer) winless Miami Dolphins.

Johnson’s most recent problems started after the Jets’ front office, led by first-time General Manager Joe Douglas, created some arguably self-inflicted wounds with their handling of their players’ availability in the trade market. Douglas told star safety Jamal Adams and his representatives that he was not on the trade market, and then, according to sources, Douglas informed the Cowboys that it would take a first and two seconds to secure Adams. Douglas confirmed that he did, indeed, field calls about Adams, but as Douglas said, he had no intention of trading him unless he received the high (and unlikely) haul in return. “We were not shopping him,” Douglas said. “Where I grew up, you listen to what people have to say when they call you.” Connor Hughes’ intensive story on this trade deadline drama confirms Douglas’ statement, as Hughes reports that “the Jets, at no point, sources said, were shopping players. Teams simply called them.”

One of those teams was the Cowboys, who had a keen interest in Adams, so much so that they held a high-level meeting near the trade deadline to decide if meeting Douglas’ ransom for Adams was doable. They ultimately passed. And naturally, word leaked out, and Adams spoke out, leading to a week from hell for Johnson. And that was before the embarrassing result of Sunday’s game, which has now put the focus of the Jets’ future on Johnson’s plate. It’s going to be a long, long, long week.

Christopher has to absorb most of the blame for the Jets’ horrible season, however this is more of a total family Johnson problem than just Christopher’s. Christopher is only in the spotlight because his brother Woody is the current United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom. Make no mistake about the Jets’ fortune: they would be horrific even if Woody were not across the Atlantic. The Jets’ problems run deeper than head coach Adam Gase, or the decision-making talents of the Johnson family. The Jets’ ownership group has too many outside advisors, many from the NFL league office. They listen to people who advise without understanding the complexity of the NFL.

Let’s go back in time to understand how the Jets got into this giant mess. The Jets have often relied on the wisdom of outside advisors, believing they are similar to the corporate world, where headhunters provide capable leaders. In December of 2014, Woody Johnson hired Charley Casserly, the former General Manager of the Washington Redskins and Houston Texans, as a consultant to help him choose his next GM. Casserly naturally recommended they hire his friend and the Texans’ former Director of College Scouting Mike Maccagnan, who worked with Casserly in Washington and Houston. They then paired Maccagnan with former Cardinals defensive coordinator Todd Bowles, and the two of them would lead the Jets into the future.

When Bowles struggled to win games over his four-year tenure, Maccagnan convinced Christopher Johnson that the talent level of the Jets was not as bad as their record, and firing Bowles would solve the problem if Johnson let Maccagnan hire the next coach and pieces of the staff. Since Christopher has no idea how or why his team had only won 28 games the last five years, he decided to keep Maccagnan and fire Bowles.

When the Jets fired Bowles at the end of the 2018 season, Maccagnan wanted to hire Baylor head coach Matt Rhule, but Rhule refused to allow Maccagnan and his Player Personnel Director Brian Heimerdinger to handpick his coaching staff. After Rhule refused, they hired Adam Gase and demanded he hire Gregg Williams as his defensive coordinator.

Soon after Gase entered he realized that the Jets’ team personnel was horrific, and their player procurement methods were not conducive to building an NFL team. Most college directors can scout individual players, but struggle with understanding the makeup of the NFL, working with the assistant coaches and dealing with the daily office environment. Being a college director will never prepare you for being a General Manager, yet most teams hire college directors for the role because they feel that understanding the draft is the essential quality needed for a General Manager. Maccagnan never was able to understand the essentials of team building as he never drafted an offensive lineman in the first four rounds of the draft during his first four years on the job. (He finally selected one in his final draft with the team — Chuma Edoga, a 2019 third-round tackle out of USC). Maccagnan’s other third-round selection in 2019, defensive lineman Jachai Polite, was talented but had issues on and off the field. Maccagnan ignored those problems and selected him anyway. Now, Polite is a free agent, as he was cut by the Jets before the season even started.

In May, just a couple of weeks after the draft, Christopher Johnson agreed with Gase that the team lacked talent and fired Maccagnan, hiring Gase’s recommendation, the highly popular Joe Douglas as his replacement. Douglas might have had the title of Player Personnel Director in Philadelphia, but he is more comfortable on the road than in the office.

So, five years have gone by and still, nothing seems to be working for the Jets. But after losing to Miami, and after the drama at the trade deadline, Johnson must regroup. How? He first needs to look inward, re-evaluating where things have gone wrong in the past and developing an owner’s creed, which consists of the following:

1. Use Common Sense. This might sound easy, but it seems to be hard for most owners of sports teams, especially the Johnson family. When Donnie Walsh was the President of the Indiana Pacers, he had complete authority to do whatever he felt. The only request of the Simon Brothers, the owners of the Pacers, was for Walsh to call them before any deal, informing them of his intentions. During those phone calls, the Simon brothers asked the right questions, forcing Walsh to explain his positions concerning his decisions, then they would let him do his business. During these calls, Walsh would monitor his answers, reflecting on his words, conviction, and the viability of his solutions. At times, after hanging up the phone, Walsh knew the right path. Johnson needs to force his people to explain their actions in detail, then ask probing questions. For example, had he asked Maccagnan the right questions and used common sense, he wouldn’t have rebuilt his organization in a backward method.

2. Create Stability. New York city is the largest city in the U.S. with mass amounts of media outlets, and Johnson must be a rock. He must not bow down to pressure, he must believe in his plan and put on blinders. He needs to block out the noise and never read a back page of any newspaper. Johnson cannot allow outside forces to interfere with his agenda, as no one is capable of understanding his problems better than him. Owners who create stability will enable a culture to develop. Besides lacking talent, Johnson’s Jets lack culture.

3. Believe in the right people. Johnson must believe in the right coach, the right general manager and allow them time, as 49ers owner Jed York has done with his staff. Because Johnson has often relied on the opinions of others rather than trusting his instincts, he never formulates a genuine belief in the people he employs. Once the sunny introductory press conference ends, then the problems start, then the doubt enters. Instead of winning the press conference, Johnson needs to win the hire.

4. Preserve the Pride. Johnson must develop a deep sense of pride in the traditions of the Jets, from the uniforms to the ex-players. All great teams have traditions, have a keen sense of their history.

5. Care more than anyone. Johnson needs to show the people who work for the Jets that he cares, not that he only pays. He needs to invest his time, energy and effort into the team all the time. He must care so much that it truly hurts on days like today.

If owners strive to accomplish these five principles each day, they would improve their team more than any first-round draft pick would, because the positive effects of it will impact the organization at every level. Sure, Jets fans right now may be calling for the firing of Gase, but doing that isn’t going to solve the team’s vast, immediate problems, nor will looking for a new GM. If Johnson starts following these five principles, though, starting today, and plans the future of his team around them, then things might finally start moving in the right direction for a change.


GAME NOTE

• Deshaun Watson was once again the best player on the field and perhaps the best player in the NFL. The depleted Texans went over to London and dominated the Jags. Watson was flawless in his play all day long even though he was throwing to receivers who were catching his passes for the first time.

We have JaMowf Adams. 

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not the greatest article, imho, and i dont know that CARING alot equates to effective ownership.

 

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 So he's saying that Johnson should not bow down to pressure and plow ahead with his misguided and ill fated all-in on Gase?   That's why we are in the position we are now.  This has been going on since Woody bought the team.

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some good points.  puts a good light on douglas.  and even gase gets some cred because he forced mac out.

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12 minutes ago, Losmeister said:

not the greatest article, imho, and i dont know that CARING alot equates to effective ownership.

 

Right. See JJ.

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I’m not a fan oh Mike but many of his points ring true with me. Believe it or not the Jets need a young coach to instill pride into the organization, not a recycled coach. The problem is they were missing many components when making their decision.


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Pretty touchy-feely article, doesn’t do much I’m afraid.....except highlight the one question that matters right now:

DO YOU BELIEVE IN JOE DOUGLAS?

if you do, let him handle this and work it out. If not there’s even more problems ahead and he should hire someone to run the whole freaking organization and then step back and out the limelight and everyday decisions 

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again...   just posted cos its NYJ related and subscription dependant....  so not everybody would be able to read otherwise...  

not promoting site or content...  just a sharin

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16 hours ago, Losmeister said:

I am a Gary Vaynerchuk fan myself.

 

 

From the GM’s Eye: Years of mistakes brought the Jets to this new low point. How does their CEO move forward?

Sam-Darnold-sacked-1024x682.jpg
By Michael Lombardi 1h agocomment-icon@2x.png 11 save-icon@2x.png

New York Jets CEO Christoper Johnson thought last week was terrible? That 29-15 Week 8 loss to the Jaguars looks like a trip to Disney compared to Sunday’s disastrous 26-18 loss to the (no longer) winless Miami Dolphins.

Johnson’s most recent problems started after the Jets’ front office, led by first-time General Manager Joe Douglas, created some arguably self-inflicted wounds with their handling of their players’ availability in the trade market. Douglas told star safety Jamal Adams and his representatives that he was not on the trade market, and then, according to sources, Douglas informed the Cowboys that it would take a first and two seconds to secure Adams. Douglas confirmed that he did, indeed, field calls about Adams, but as Douglas said, he had no intention of trading him unless he received the high (and unlikely) haul in return. “We were not shopping him,” Douglas said. “Where I grew up, you listen to what people have to say when they call you.” Connor Hughes’ intensive story on this trade deadline drama confirms Douglas’ statement, as Hughes reports that “the Jets, at no point, sources said, were shopping players. Teams simply called them.”

One of those teams was the Cowboys, who had a keen interest in Adams, so much so that they held a high-level meeting near the trade deadline to decide if meeting Douglas’ ransom for Adams was doable. They ultimately passed. And naturally, word leaked out, and Adams spoke out, leading to a week from hell for Johnson. And that was before the embarrassing result of Sunday’s game, which has now put the focus of the Jets’ future on Johnson’s plate. It’s going to be a long, long, long week.

Christopher has to absorb most of the blame for the Jets’ horrible season, however this is more of a total family Johnson problem than just Christopher’s. Christopher is only in the spotlight because his brother Woody is the current United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom. Make no mistake about the Jets’ fortune: they would be horrific even if Woody were not across the Atlantic. The Jets’ problems run deeper than head coach Adam Gase, or the decision-making talents of the Johnson family. The Jets’ ownership group has too many outside advisors, many from the NFL league office. They listen to people who advise without understanding the complexity of the NFL.

Let’s go back in time to understand how the Jets got into this giant mess. The Jets have often relied on the wisdom of outside advisors, believing they are similar to the corporate world, where headhunters provide capable leaders. In December of 2014, Woody Johnson hired Charley Casserly, the former General Manager of the Washington Redskins and Houston Texans, as a consultant to help him choose his next GM. Casserly naturally recommended they hire his friend and the Texans’ former Director of College Scouting Mike Maccagnan, who worked with Casserly in Washington and Houston. They then paired Maccagnan with former Cardinals defensive coordinator Todd Bowles, and the two of them would lead the Jets into the future.

When Bowles struggled to win games over his four-year tenure, Maccagnan convinced Christopher Johnson that the talent level of the Jets was not as bad as their record, and firing Bowles would solve the problem if Johnson let Maccagnan hire the next coach and pieces of the staff. Since Christopher has no idea how or why his team had only won 28 games the last five years, he decided to keep Maccagnan and fire Bowles.

When the Jets fired Bowles at the end of the 2018 season, Maccagnan wanted to hire Baylor head coach Matt Rhule, but Rhule refused to allow Maccagnan and his Player Personnel Director Brian Heimerdinger to handpick his coaching staff. After Rhule refused, they hired Adam Gase and demanded he hire Gregg Williams as his defensive coordinator.

Soon after Gase entered he realized that the Jets’ team personnel was horrific, and their player procurement methods were not conducive to building an NFL team. Most college directors can scout individual players, but struggle with understanding the makeup of the NFL, working with the assistant coaches and dealing with the daily office environment. Being a college director will never prepare you for being a General Manager, yet most teams hire college directors for the role because they feel that understanding the draft is the essential quality needed for a General Manager. Maccagnan never was able to understand the essentials of team building as he never drafted an offensive lineman in the first four rounds of the draft during his first four years on the job. (He finally selected one in his final draft with the team — Chuma Edoga, a 2019 third-round tackle out of USC). Maccagnan’s other third-round selection in 2019, defensive lineman Jachai Polite, was talented but had issues on and off the field. Maccagnan ignored those problems and selected him anyway. Now, Polite is a free agent, as he was cut by the Jets before the season even started.

In May, just a couple of weeks after the draft, Christopher Johnson agreed with Gase that the team lacked talent and fired Maccagnan, hiring Gase’s recommendation, the highly popular Joe Douglas as his replacement. Douglas might have had the title of Player Personnel Director in Philadelphia, but he is more comfortable on the road than in the office.

So, five years have gone by and still, nothing seems to be working for the Jets. But after losing to Miami, and after the drama at the trade deadline, Johnson must regroup. How? He first needs to look inward, re-evaluating where things have gone wrong in the past and developing an owner’s creed, which consists of the following:

1. Use Common Sense. This might sound easy, but it seems to be hard for most owners of sports teams, especially the Johnson family. When Donnie Walsh was the President of the Indiana Pacers, he had complete authority to do whatever he felt. The only request of the Simon Brothers, the owners of the Pacers, was for Walsh to call them before any deal, informing them of his intentions. During those phone calls, the Simon brothers asked the right questions, forcing Walsh to explain his positions concerning his decisions, then they would let him do his business. During these calls, Walsh would monitor his answers, reflecting on his words, conviction, and the viability of his solutions. At times, after hanging up the phone, Walsh knew the right path. Johnson needs to force his people to explain their actions in detail, then ask probing questions. For example, had he asked Maccagnan the right questions and used common sense, he wouldn’t have rebuilt his organization in a backward method.

2. Create Stability. New York city is the largest city in the U.S. with mass amounts of media outlets, and Johnson must be a rock. He must not bow down to pressure, he must believe in his plan and put on blinders. He needs to block out the noise and never read a back page of any newspaper. Johnson cannot allow outside forces to interfere with his agenda, as no one is capable of understanding his problems better than him. Owners who create stability will enable a culture to develop. Besides lacking talent, Johnson’s Jets lack culture.

3. Believe in the right people. Johnson must believe in the right coach, the right general manager and allow them time, as 49ers owner Jed York has done with his staff. Because Johnson has often relied on the opinions of others rather than trusting his instincts, he never formulates a genuine belief in the people he employs. Once the sunny introductory press conference ends, then the problems start, then the doubt enters. Instead of winning the press conference, Johnson needs to win the hire.

4. Preserve the Pride. Johnson must develop a deep sense of pride in the traditions of the Jets, from the uniforms to the ex-players. All great teams have traditions, have a keen sense of their history.

5. Care more than anyone. Johnson needs to show the people who work for the Jets that he cares, not that he only pays. He needs to invest his time, energy and effort into the team all the time. He must care so much that it truly hurts on days like today.

If owners strive to accomplish these five principles each day, they would improve their team more than any first-round draft pick would, because the positive effects of it will impact the organization at every level. Sure, Jets fans right now may be calling for the firing of Gase, but doing that isn’t going to solve the team’s vast, immediate problems, nor will looking for a new GM. If Johnson starts following these five principles, though, starting today, and plans the future of his team around them, then things might finally start moving in the right direction for a change.


GAME NOTE

• Deshaun Watson was once again the best player on the field and perhaps the best player in the NFL. The depleted Texans went over to London and dominated the Jags. Watson was flawless in his play all day long even though he was throwing to receivers who were catching his passes for the first time.

We have JaMowf Adams. 

This is the highlight of the article.

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Wait.  This was published in The Athletic? And people PAY to read this?


Yes, and the Jets haven’t executed it.


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5 hours ago, greenwave81 said:

Pretty touchy-feely article, doesn’t do much I’m afraid.....except highlight the one question that matters right now:

DO YOU BELIEVE IN JOE DOUGLAS? 

well let's see

he signed center Ryan Kalil a 36 year old with a trick neck out of retirement and gave him 8 million dollars 

he signed PK Kaare Vedvik a player who couldn't kick and started him week 1 directly costing them the Buffalo game (Vedvik missed a FG and XP, they lose by 1)

he traded a 5th to NE for Demarious THomas a player who can't catch yet somehow gets all the targets in Gase's simpleton offense 

he traded a 6th to IND for Nate Hairston a CB that is somehow worse than Darryl Roberts and Bryan Poole 

he got a 3rd and 4th for Leonard Williams, i guess that's a decent return for that guy... and then alienated the team's best remaining player 

honestly these aren't the greatest moves 

 

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4 hours ago, JiF said:

I was really hoping the pain of passing on Watson would subside with Darnold showing out and looking like a franchise QB but since that's not happening, the pain of passing on Watson has been accelerated as he's on route to an MVP caliber season.   Especially with Jamal Adams showing his true colors and generally sucking, it's really the worst combination ever.

I'm still in physical pain they passed on Jimmy G for Jace Amaro 

that might have been the exact moment the team broke my spirit 

the simpsons GIF

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4 hours ago, JiF said:

I was really hoping the pain of passing on Watson would subside with Darnold showing out and looking like a franchise QB but since that's not happening, the pain of passing on Watson has been accelerated as he's on route to an MVP caliber season.   Especially with Jamal Adams showing his true colors and generally sucking, it's really the worst combination ever.

Can you imagine if Watson wins an MVP this year or down the road and the Jets look back and they passed on not one, but two MVP quarterbacks because they had Christian Hackenberg on the roster? Jesus Christ this franchise is doomed.

 

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38 minutes ago, bitonti said:

I'm still in physical pain they passed on Jimmy G for Jace Amaro 

that might have been the exact moment the team broke my spirit 

the simpsons GIF

There are so many of these moments with this franchise it's ridiculous.  Sapp/Reed were the ones that have stung the most the longest but the Watson pain is starting to rival.  It really is pathetic when you can legitimately make a claim, that you could do it better than your favorite sports team.  I get most of the time it's just blow hard talk but with this team, it's a legit claim and we actually have the proof. 

lol

Go Jets! 

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49 minutes ago, bitonti said:

I'm still in physical pain they passed on Jimmy G for Jace Amaro 

that might have been the exact moment the team broke my spirit 

the simpsons GIF

For what its worth, we probably would have ruined him too.  You can take solace in that.

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37 minutes ago, Skeet Ulrich said:

Can you imagine if Watson wins an MVP this year or down the road and the Jets look back and they passed on not one, but two MVP quarterbacks because they had Christian Hackenberg on the roster? Jesus Christ this franchise is doomed.

 

food drink mcdonalds GIF

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well let's see
he signed center Ryan Kalil a 36 year old with a trick neck out of retirement and gave him 8 million dollars 
he signed PK Kaare Vedvik a player who couldn't kick and started him week 1 directly costing them the Buffalo game (Vedvik missed a FG and XP, they lose by 1)
he traded a 5th to NE for Demarious THomas a player who can't catch yet somehow gets all the targets in Gase's simpleton offense 
he traded a 6th to IND for Nate Hairston a CB that is somehow worse than Darryl Roberts and Bryan Poole 
he got a 3rd and 4th for Leonard Williams, i guess that's a decent return for that guy... and then alienated the team's best remaining player 
honestly these aren't the greatest moves 
 


Let me preface I never heard of Joe.D but when I started to circle all these guys affiliated with Gase, ie Jerimiah, the other guy from espn, Douglas I started getting concerned. Now, what are they going to do? Keep Gase because he basically pushed for him? The Jets better hope Douglas is ready to break a friendship or this goes really wrong.

Oh, and what are the Jets front office dream team doing anyway? Once a couple of these front office guys leave it’s the beginning of another Jets debacle.


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On 11/5/2019 at 3:43 PM, chrisfaceoff said:

For what its worth, we probably would have ruined him too.  You can take solace in that.

Probably

but the reason for taking Jace Amaro? 

to give Geno Smith more weaponz 

sigh

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On 11/5/2019 at 2:52 PM, bitonti said:

I'm still in physical pain they passed on Jimmy G for Jace Amaro 

that might have been the exact moment the team broke my spirit 

the simpsons GIF

Suspect it bothers Bellichick a great deal that Garapolo was traded away. Never understood how this franchise FOREVER has no problem picking more DBs and DL guys like there's some prize for doing so. But when it comes to QBs, not so much. 

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The background story and analysis of where Jets are today is somewhat insightful and interesting.

The recommendations seem practically useless and a softball tossed at the Johnsons.

Jason Fitzgerald did do a much better job.  

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