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Jetsfan80

Who has the greatest singing voice in Classic Rock history?

Greatest singing voice in Classic Rock history  

33 members have voted

  1. 1. Who has the greatest singing voice in Classic Rock history?

    • Robert Plant (Led Zeppelin)
      6
    • Freddie Mercury (Queen)
      12
    • David Bowie
      0
    • Stevie Nicks (Fleetwood Mac)
      0
    • Jim Morrison (The Doors)
      0
    • Ian Gillan (Deep Purple)
      0
    • John Lennon (The Beatles)
      1
    • Paul McCartney (The Beatles)
      0
    • Johnny Cash
      0
    • Ozzy Osbourne (Black Sabbath)
      0
    • Ronnie James Dio (Rainbow, Black Sabbath)
      0
    • Steven Tyler (Aerosmith)
      0
    • Roger Daltrey (The Who)
      2
    • Steve Perry (Journey)
      1
    • Ann Wilson (Heart)
      1
    • Mick Jagger (The Rolling Stones)
      1
    • Janis Joplin
      2
    • Elton John
      1
    • Honorable Mention Group (Specify in Thread): Pat Benatar, Bon Scott, Paul Simon, Bob Dylan, Joe Cocker, Karen Carpenter, Annie Lennox, Don Henley, Iggy Pop, James Taylor, John Fogerty, Gregg Allman, Lou Reed, Rod Stewart, Brian Wilson, Chuck Berry, Neil Young, Bruce Springsteen, Steve Winwood, Van Morrison, Stevie Wonder, James Brown, Aretha Franklin, Peter Gabriel, Annie Haslam, Jon Anderson, Merry Clayton, John Wetton, Greg Lake, James Dewer, John Cafferty
      3
    • OTHER - Specify in thread
      3


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Great thread idea.  I could spend all day adding some overlooked vocalists.  I'll add a few of my faves.  Will say that in a live setting the best I ever saw were Daltry, Mercury and Plant.  Gun to my head, I'd go with Daltry.  

A few more to add to the list:  Geddy Lee (Rush): Voice is gone now, but back in the day had incredible power.  One note and you know it's Geddy.  Some folks never understood that he was not singing in falsetto or trying to impersonate Plant.  It's his natural voice.

David Byron (Uriah Heep): Before the endless touring and alcohol destroyed it, David was an impressive frontman and singer who along with Ken Hensley produced Heep's complex layered vocal harmonies.

 

Nick Drake: Incredibly talented guitarist, songwriter and vocalist.  Depression/mental illness killed him at age 26.

Another singer from that era who gets no love is Noddy Holder of Slade.  Stunningly powerful voice in the same vein as Steve Marriott.

Two big omissions from the women's side are Bonnie Raitt and Chrissie Hynde (Pretenders).  Both have gorgeous distinctive voices.

Edit:  Forgot one of my heroes, Ian Hunter of Mott.

 

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From the Bowie crooner school, need to add Bryan Ferry of Roxy Music:

Edit:  Elvis Costello.

 

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Add a young Alice Cooper and Robin Zander of Cheap Trick to the honorable mention.  Both were great singers.

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How'd Prince get omitted?  Gifted vocalist both on record and in a live setting.

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10 hours ago, Jetsfan80 said:

I didn't consider him "Classic Rock".  

You have Stevie Wonder and James Brown in the honorable mention.  Prince's music had more of a classic rock sound than those two artists, especially his guitar playing.  Prince could shred with the best.  And I'd put his voice against anybody.

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Part Paul Rodgers and part Robert Plant, Lou Gramm of Foreigner belongs on the list.  Powerful, evocative voice for sure.

 

 

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I was a teenager when the Jesus Christ Superstar album was released.  I was obsessed with the brilliant songs and especially Ian Gillan's incredible vocals in the title role.   Had not seen the video below until very recently.  Just ridiculous vocal chops.

 

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9 minutes ago, Jetsfan80 said:

 

Well the other issue is that Prince wasn’t really part of that 1967 through 1982 range that I established in the original post. He hit the scene at the tail end of the classic rock era.

What?  Prince's first five albums (starting with 1978's For You and including the seminal 1999 in 1982) were released before or in 1982.

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14 minutes ago, #27TheDominator said:

I saw him about 10 times on Dahhhn Kirshner's Rahhhhck Concert, which came on after SNL.  I sure didn't watch it after high school. 

Saw Prince four times over the years.  Equal parts rock, funk and gospel show.  Played guitar, bass, piano, drums and sang all at an insanely high level.  Prince's guitar ability would have impressed Hendrix while his vocals would have garnered James Brown's approval.  Also had absolutely kick ass musicians in his bands.  You walked out of those 3+ hour Prince shows just stunned/drained by what you had experienced.

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12 minutes ago, #27TheDominator said:

I saw him a couple of times at the Garden.  He was never my thing, but always impressed.  Of course, the cover of Whole Lotta Love, which was more up my alley, but the guy sure could switch gears.  Teeny little fellow when you meet him, but I guess that is the other thread.

Yeah, he was definitely a hand puppet in stature.  

 

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