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Darnold Schwarzenegger

The athletics 2020 Draft guide

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Jeff Okudah, Ohio State (6-1, 205): Okudah didn’t run a blazing 40 at 4.47 seconds but performed magnificently in the jumps with a 41-inch vertical and 11 feet, 3 inches broad. “I thought there was a chance he’d break 4.40,” said one scout. “He’s a top-five, no-brainer. He’s super talented. He’s 6-1, he can run, he has cover skills, he’s smart, he’s tough, he’s got great makeup. He needs to get stronger, but he’s only 20.” In 2017 he played behind Denzel Ward, who went fourth to Cleveland in 2018. “Different type than Denzel Ward,” said another scout. “This guy’s really long. Really improved (in 2019). I don’t quite see top-10 talent.” Finished with three interceptions and 18 passes defensed. “I like Okudah, but I don’t think he’s very physical and I don’t think he played against top receivers,” said a third scout. “I never really saw him challenged in the Big Ten. Best game I ever saw him play was last year against Washington in the Rose Bowl. This year, he was the last man between Jonathan Taylor and the end zone, and he just dove at him and didn’t come close. But he can cover.”

 

CeeDee Lamb, Oklahoma (6-1 1/2, 195): Lamb’s ordinary combine workout — a 4.48-second 40-yard dash, a 34 1/2-inch vertical jump — encapsulated what is viewed as one of the deepest wide receiver classes ever, but one that perhaps lacks a generational talent. “I think this is a really good wide receiver group but this isn’t a slam-dunk, top-five group,” one scout said. “It’s loaded from like (picks) 20 to 50. There are 10 guys in that one. But there’s no Julio Jones, Calvin Johnson, those types of guys.” Lamb, a three-year starter, averaged 19 yards per catch and caught 32 touchdown passes. “Best run after the catch since Amari Cooper,” another scout said. “Every time he touches the ball it’s a potential touchdown. He had one drop in the six games I watched. He’s just so quick. Gets separation. Excellent on fly sweeps. He’d be a bigger Marquise Brown from there last year.” He returned punts all three years, averaging 8.8 yards per return. “You see him in person, you’re kind of turned off a little bit,” a third scout said. “Then you watch the guy after the catch. For a guy that’s his build, he plays stronger than you would expect. He’s a big-time playmaker.”

Henry Ruggs, Alabama (5-11, 188): Henry Ruggs, Alabama (5-11, 188): He led everyone at the combine with a 4.24 in the 40, not to mention a vertical jump of 42 inches and a broad jump of 10 feet, 9 inches. “He’s super fast,” said one scout. “Speed, speed, speed. He’s really good.” Ruggs had 98 receptions, a 17.5-yard average and 24 touchdown catches in a three-year career. “Go look at the top 20 receivers that have run fast and none of them are any good,” another scout said. “People say, ‘Ruggs ran 4.2. He’s going to be a Hall of Famer.’ He was essentially, in Alabama’s offense, the third guy. He was really a specialist where they designed certain plays for him, mainly that over route where he goes from one side of the field to the other … and outruns everybody. He is fast, but when people get on him, you don’t see the same speed and route-running. He’s not a make-you-miss player. If you use him for what his strengths are, he’ll be good in your offense. If you expect him to come in and be your No. 1 receiver, I don’t see that. He’s a space-vertical linear route runner that needs space to catch the ball.”

Jerry Jeudy, Alabama (6-1, 193): A third-year junior and two-year starter. “He has good speed and runs great routes,” said one scout. “Gets a lot of separation. More of a polished guy than Ruggs and also taller.” Jeudy solidified his status by running 4.44 seconds in the 40. “He’s very, very quick,” said another scout. “Reminds me somewhat of Amari Cooper with the quickness, the routes, the run after the catch. He’ll play, but I don’t think he’ll be a big-time receiver.”

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Offensive line (9)

Andrew Thomas, Georgia (6-5, 315): His arm length of 36 1/8 inches tied for second longest among offensive linemen. “There’s not one negative about him,” one scout said. “He’s my third-best player in the draft. The guy’s just special, and he’s big, too. There’s a big difference between him and the rest. He’s more like (Jonathan) Ogden than (Walter) Jones or (Willie) Roaf. He’s not as good an athlete as Jones or Roaf. He’s tougher than both those guys were. He doesn’t have Ogden’s height.” He ran 5.17 seconds. “In any other year you’d say, ‘5.22 at 315, that’s killer,’” another scout said. “He’s patient. He redirects. He positions easily in the run game and stays on players. Light on his feet.”

Mekhi Becton, Louisville (6-7 1/2, 357): He made a dramatic improvement in 2019 and interviewed well in Indianapolis, too. “He came out of his shell,” said one scout. “Just being able to talk ball, being a kid you liked. I’m shocked if he doesn’t go top 10. He’s probably gained the most steam of the group.” Becton a sensational 5.11-second 40-yard dash at 364 pounds. His arms measured 35 5/8 inches and his hands were 10 3/4 inches. “I’ve never seen anything like this,” said another scout. “For years, other scouts used the term ‘dancing bear’ that I never liked. That’s what this guy is. He plays like he’s 200. He knows how to use his hands and he knocks people on the ground.” Said a third scout: “He tries to maul you right from the start with his punch. After that, if the play extends a little bit, he does a lot of watching and not a lot of effort moving his feet to stay on people. In pass pro, he’s so big and so long it takes so long to get around him.”

Tristan Wirfs, Iowa (6-5, 320): His 4.87-second clocking tied Ball State’s Danny Pinter for the fastest 40. “I think he’s the first (offensive lineman) taken,” said one scout. “Him moving on the floor at the combine is one of the best I’ve ever seen for an offensive lineman. Just moving around naturally. Bend, body control, light on his feet. You don’t see that on tape. He got beat a lot on inside moves where it doesn’t look like he redirects very well. I thought he would be a Pro Bowl guard, not really an elite tackle. But seeing him move at the combine, he looked like an elite, elite left tackle.” Started at right tackle for the Hawkeyes but also made a few starts on the left side. “Played right tackle so you’re a little bit skeptical,” a second scout said. “Powerful guy. Things that stood out were his strength and his toughness.” His arms measured just 34 inches.

Isaiah Wilson, Georgia (6-6 1/2, 350): He renounced his final two years of eligibility. “He is one tough, nasty guy,” one scout said. “He’s the right tackle but I guess you could play him on the left and get by. He needs to learn to use his hands more. He’s strong and really nasty.” He ran the slowest 40 of the top linemen at 5.37 seconds. His arms measured 35 1/2 inches. “I think people are asleep on him,” a second scout said. “He could play on the left side. He’s enormous. He’s just not as clean of a package as Thomas. Thomas is a cleaner kid. But there’s film of Wilson where he looks every bit as good as Thomas.”

Jedrick Wills, Alabama (6-4, 312): Teams have had marginal success drafting Crimson Tide offensive linemen during the Nick Saban era. “We weren’t as firm on him as some of the other ones,” one scout said in reference to the other leading tackles in the draft. “He’s a pretty good athlete. Pretty strong. Shows some nasty. He played right tackle there but he looked like he can play left tackle.” One scout brought up Jonah Williams, the Alabama left tackle in 2017 and 2018 who was the 11th pick last year. “Jonah Williams is an all-star compared to this guy,” he said. “Awful. He’s upright. He’s a stiff guy.” He ran 5.06 seconds. “I’m not crazy about him but people love him,” said a third scout. “Every time I watched him, I didn’t see a really good athlete. Worked out well. I just don’t see the movement, finish, talent of a first-rounder. I do not think he could play left tackle.”

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“It’s loaded from like (picks) 20 to 50. There are 10 guys in that one. But there’s no Julio Jones, Calvin Johnson, those types of guys.”

This is how I'm feeling about the WR group.  I want one in the 2nd round.  And another in the 3rd round probably.  

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“Go look at the top 20 receivers that have run fast and none of them are any good,” another scout said. 

This is just sloppy scouting.  "Oh....other WRs who ran fast didn't amount to anything, so that means Ruggs isn't going to be good."

Scout the player - not the players that came before him.

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Sorry just to edit, the notes I posted are not from Bruglers guide. Just other scouting notes from the Athletic and Bob McGinn. I thought they were the same.

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23 minutes ago, Matt39 said:

Offensive line (9)

Andrew Thomas, Georgia (6-5, 315): His arm length of 36 1/8 inches tied for second longest among offensive linemen. “There’s not one negative about him,” one scout said. “He’s my third-best player in the draft. The guy’s just special, and he’s big, too. There’s a big difference between him and the rest. He’s more like (Jonathan) Ogden than (Walter) Jones or (Willie) Roaf. He’s not as good an athlete as Jones or Roaf. He’s tougher than both those guys were. He doesn’t have Ogden’s height.” He ran 5.17 seconds. “In any other year you’d say, ‘5.22 at 315, that’s killer,’” another scout said. “He’s patient. He redirects. He positions easily in the run game and stays on players. Light on his feet.”

Mekhi Becton, Louisville (6-7 1/2, 357): He made a dramatic improvement in 2019 and interviewed well in Indianapolis, too. “He came out of his shell,” said one scout. “Just being able to talk ball, being a kid you liked. I’m shocked if he doesn’t go top 10. He’s probably gained the most steam of the group.” Becton a sensational 5.11-second 40-yard dash at 364 pounds. His arms measured 35 5/8 inches and his hands were 10 3/4 inches. “I’ve never seen anything like this,” said another scout. “For years, other scouts used the term ‘dancing bear’ that I never liked. That’s what this guy is. He plays like he’s 200. He knows how to use his hands and he knocks people on the ground.” Said a third scout: “He tries to maul you right from the start with his punch. After that, if the play extends a little bit, he does a lot of watching and not a lot of effort moving his feet to stay on people. In pass pro, he’s so big and so long it takes so long to get around him.”

Tristan Wirfs, Iowa (6-5, 320): His 4.87-second clocking tied Ball State’s Danny Pinter for the fastest 40. “I think he’s the first (offensive lineman) taken,” said one scout. “Him moving on the floor at the combine is one of the best I’ve ever seen for an offensive lineman. Just moving around naturally. Bend, body control, light on his feet. You don’t see that on tape. He got beat a lot on inside moves where it doesn’t look like he redirects very well. I thought he would be a Pro Bowl guard, not really an elite tackle. But seeing him move at the combine, he looked like an elite, elite left tackle.” Started at right tackle for the Hawkeyes but also made a few starts on the left side. “Played right tackle so you’re a little bit skeptical,” a second scout said. “Powerful guy. Things that stood out were his strength and his toughness.” His arms measured just 34 inches.

Isaiah Wilson, Georgia (6-6 1/2, 350): He renounced his final two years of eligibility. “He is one tough, nasty guy,” one scout said. “He’s the right tackle but I guess you could play him on the left and get by. He needs to learn to use his hands more. He’s strong and really nasty.” He ran the slowest 40 of the top linemen at 5.37 seconds. His arms measured 35 1/2 inches. “I think people are asleep on him,” a second scout said. “He could play on the left side. He’s enormous. He’s just not as clean of a package as Thomas. Thomas is a cleaner kid. But there’s film of Wilson where he looks every bit as good as Thomas.”

Jedrick Wills, Alabama (6-4, 312): Teams have had marginal success drafting Crimson Tide offensive linemen during the Nick Saban era. “We weren’t as firm on him as some of the other ones,” one scout said in reference to the other leading tackles in the draft. “He’s a pretty good athlete. Pretty strong. Shows some nasty. He played right tackle there but he looked like he can play left tackle.” One scout brought up Jonah Williams, the Alabama left tackle in 2017 and 2018 who was the 11th pick last year. “Jonah Williams is an all-star compared to this guy,” he said. “Awful. He’s upright. He’s a stiff guy.” He ran 5.06 seconds. “I’m not crazy about him but people love him,” said a third scout. “Every time I watched him, I didn’t see a really good athlete. Worked out well. I just don’t see the movement, finish, talent of a first-rounder. I do not think he could play left tackle.”

The different opinions on the tackles this year is really fascinating.   It seems that even within one team there may be serious disagreements on how to rank them.   But one thing is for sure, the OTs present more value (at 11) than the WRs (who you could get good ones at 48 and maybe third round).

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9 minutes ago, Dinamite said:

The different opinions on the tackles this year is really fascinating.   It seems that even within one team there may be serious disagreements on how to rank them.   But one thing is for sure, the OTs present more value (at 11) than the WRs (who you could get good ones at 48 and maybe third round).

I have been doing a Mock draft Simulator by PFN way too much as I quarantine.  I have tried both drafting a OT and WR at 11 multiple times, and it seems to turn out better starting with OT.  I took a WR with the next 2 picks, our 2nd and first 3rd, and got players like Michael Pittman Jr and Van Jefferson in the 3rd.

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54 minutes ago, IndianaJet said:

This is just sloppy scouting.  "Oh....other WRs who ran fast didn't amount to anything, so that means Ruggs isn't going to be good."

Scout the player - not the players that came before him.

image.png.72d3aa50f53f286439be162912c494ee.png

I like this draft but I would like it even more if we sign Jason Peters.

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1 hour ago, nycdan said:

This is how I'm feeling about the WR group.  I want one in the 2nd round.  And another in the 3rd round probably.  

The late teens and early 20's are the perfect spot for grabbing a Justin Jefferson or Denzel Mims, or possibly one of the Top 3 if they drop (doubtful).   Early Round 2 with guys like Higgins, Reagor, Shenault, etc. is Value City, baby!  I'd love to be there.....but we need to climb from that #48 spot into the 30's I think.  Not sure anyone drops unless it's Brandon Aiyuk from ASU (who I really like) because of his core injury situation.  Maybe the same thing happens with Shenault.

Getting another in the 3rd would be great, hopefully a high quality guy like Pittman, Claypool or Edwards.

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14 minutes ago, Darnold Schwarzenegger said:

Can you guys access the file? doesn't look like it was able to post. 

Yes.

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4 hours ago, Matt39 said:

Offensive line 

Jedrick Wills, Alabama (6-4, 312):

 One scout brought up Jonah Williams, the Alabama left tackle in 2017 and 2018 who was the 11th pick last year. “Jonah Williams is an all-star compared to this guy,” he said. “Awful. He’s upright. He’s a stiff guy.” He ran 5.06 seconds. “I’m not crazy about him but people love him,” said a third scout. “Every time I watched him, I didn’t see a really good athlete. Worked out well. I just don’t see the movement, finish, talent of a first-rounder. I do not think he could play left tackle.”

 

Yikes.  Pretty damning report on Wills.  

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Just now, Jetsfan80 said:

 

Yikes.  Pretty damning report on Wills.  

If you click the PDF file, that's not at all what he states about wills. That's somebody else's analysis

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4 hours ago, Matt39 said:

 “I think this is a really good wide receiver group but this isn’t a slam-dunk, top-five group,” one scout said. “It’s loaded from like (picks) 20 to 50. There are 10 guys in that one. But there’s no Julio Jones, Calvin Johnson, those types of guys.”

Another strong argument to trade down unless one of the OT's we like or Okudah drops to 11.  

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4 hours ago, Matt39 said:

Sorry just to edit, the notes I posted are not from Bruglers guide. Just other scouting notes from the Athletic and Bob McGinn. I thought they were the same.

Thanks for posting those. McGinn always has good stuff. Hated seeing him end up behind a paywall. 

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4 hours ago, nycdan said:

This is how I'm feeling about the WR group.  I want one in the 2nd round.  And another in the 3rd round probably.  

The problem with that plan is that there may be 8-10 WRs taken before we get to pick in the 2nd. You could have 6/7 in the first round alone. 

We pick 16th in the 2nd round. We likely won't see Shenault/Pittman/Raegor/Mims or even Hamler (who I love but isn't really a #1 type WR) on the board at 48. 

You may be looking at Claypool/Edwards/Hill/Gandy-Golden sitting there at 48 and I could see us passing on those guys because they really aren't 2nd round talent. 

I hope I am wrong because I want a OT with our 1st pick but we may not see the WR talent at 48 that some here think.

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2 minutes ago, JoJoTownsell1 said:

The problem with that plan is that there may be 8-10 WRs taken before we get to pick in the 2nd. You could have 6/7 in the first round alone. 

We pick 16th in the 2nd round. We likely won't see Shenault/Pittman/Raegor/Mims or even Hamler (who I love but isn't really a #1 type WR) on the board at 48. 

You may be looking at Claypool/Edwards/Hill/Gandy-Golden sitting there at 48 and I could see us passing on those guys because they really aren't 2nd round talent. 

I hope I am wrong because I want a OT with our 1st pick but we may not see the WR talent at 48 that some here think.

 

Trade back from 11.  Then trade up from our 2nd round slot.  Problem solved.

Or just trade Adams.  

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One thing I have noticed is that the differences in rankings typically comes down to the relative importance the evaluator places on skill at run blocking versus pass blocking. The Top 4 OTs are not equally as good in these areas. From what we have seen from JD in free agency so far he values pass blocking over run blocking. That should be a solid hint to the OT we like in the draft

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28 minutes ago, T0mShane said:

Thanks for posting those. McGinn always has good stuff. Hated seeing him end up behind a paywall. 

Just remind me to close out the free trial lol

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Brugler puts together a really comprehensive guide its a good beach or pool read, pre social distancing. However it misses on the "dirt" or the scouts take where you're getting real deal flags that Naworcki used to provide. I get not doing it for his sake and the players (and avoiding the finger wagging from twitter) but...there's really nothing there you need to spend your money on that you cant find on your own.

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1 hour ago, JoJoTownsell1 said:

The problem with that plan is that there may be 8-10 WRs taken before we get to pick in the 2nd. You could have 6/7 in the first round alone. 

We pick 16th in the 2nd round. We likely won't see Shenault/Pittman/Raegor/Mims or even Hamler (who I love but isn't really a #1 type WR) on the board at 48. 

You may be looking at Claypool/Edwards/Hill/Gandy-Golden sitting there at 48 and I could see us passing on those guys because they really aren't 2nd round talent. 

I hope I am wrong because I want a OT with our 1st pick but we may not see the WR talent at 48 that some here think.

 There is definitely going to be a run on wide receivers...  that's why we either have to trade Jamal Adams or move down in the draft. We are stuck between a rock and a hard place and JD has to figure something out!!! We need more draft picks.

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6 hours ago, Lil O said:

I have been doing a Mock draft Simulator by PFN way too much as I quarantine.  I have tried both drafting a OT and WR at 11 multiple times, and it seems to turn out better starting with OT.  I took a WR with the next 2 picks, our 2nd and first 3rd, and got players like Michael Pittman Jr and Van Jefferson in the 3rd.

We don't want Van Jefferson.  We already have a slot  and he is pretty good.  And Pittman pales to the top round 1 WRs.  

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2 hours ago, JoJoTownsell1 said:

The problem with that plan is that there may be 8-10 WRs taken before we get to pick in the 2nd. You could have 6/7 in the first round alone. 

We pick 16th in the 2nd round. We likely won't see Shenault/Pittman/Raegor/Mims or even Hamler (who I love but isn't really a #1 type WR) on the board at 48. 

You may be looking at Claypool/Edwards/Hill/Gandy-Golden sitting there at 48 and I could see us passing on those guys because they really aren't 2nd round talent. 

I hope I am wrong because I want a OT with our 1st pick but we may not see the WR talent at 48 that some here think.

Every time I see the Jets taking a OT at 11, the WRs at 48 are not what you'd expect.  Pittman is usually there.  Sometimes Aiyuk. Occasionally Reagor.   Never at 48:  Mims, Higgins, J Jefferson, Shenault.    

 

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3 hours ago, Jetsfan80 said:

 

Yikes.  Pretty damning report on Wills.  

Wills IS & Will BE The BEST OL in the 2020 Draft

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