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munchmemory

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So as not to clog up the one specific to music videos, figured we could use this thread to post items about music, personalities and other pop culture.   Idea came to mind after reading this story about Queen's Brian May who apparently destroyed his gluteus maximus with “over-enthusiastic gardening.”  LMFAO!  How is that even possible?  I'm sure an endless supply of jokes and jibes are going to cascade from all aspects of the rock/entertainment communities.  

Brian May is dealing with excessive amounts of pain after ripping his gluteus maximus during a session of “over-enthusiastic gardening.”

While the Queen guitarist is likely to be the butt of many jokes, his injury is no laughing matter.

In a video posted to Instagram, the 72-year-old rocker gave a POV shot while being pushed through a hospital in a wheelchair. An accompanying photo featured the guitarist wearing a face mask.

“No - the Virus didn’t get me yet - thank God,” May noted in the caption, immediately alleviating fans’ fears about a potential COVID-19 infection. The rocker went on to explain how he sustained his unusual malady.

“As well as getting over-stretched and harassed by too many demands ... I managed to rip my Gluteus Maximus to shreds in a moment of over-enthusiastic gardening. So suddenly I find myself in a hospital getting scanned to find out exactly how much I’ve actually damaged myself.”

May further revealed that he “won’t be able to walk for a while” because of the severity of the injury. He added that sleeping will also be difficult, as “the pain is relentless.”

As a result, the legendary Queen guitarist claims he’ll step away from the spotlight while he recovers. May had been delivering a series of free guitar lessons for fans to enjoy while in lockdown due to coronavirus. Now, the rocker will "go dark" so he can focus on rest and recuperation.

“Please, please don’t send me sympathy," May said in closing. "I just need some healing silence for a while. I’ll be back - but I need the complete break. OK? Thanks. Take care out there.”

Thus far, the musician seems to be breaking his own rules. May has posted multiple social media posts since his initial injury update.

Read More: Brian May Hospitalized After Ripping Gluteus Maximus ‘To Shreds’ | https://ultimateclassicrock.com/brian-may-injury/?utm_source=tsmclip&utm_medium=referral

 

 

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There are a ton of these "Hitler Reacts" videos.  Most are hilarious.  Saw this yesterday and was rolling.  So many creative folks out there.

 

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I've been a fan of Zoe Bell since first seeing her in the 2004 documentary about stuntwomen, Double Dare.  Have followed her career a bit and really enjoyed her performance in Tarantino's Death Proof amongst others.

Anyway, she's a complete badass.  Came across this bit of lunacy from her yesterday.  Video has a bunch of folks you might recognize, many of whom Zoe served as their stunt double.  Click on the first comment to see who they are as well as time stamps.

 

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This has got to be awful for Mr. May.  You can't walk, sit or do much at all. Can you imagine how bad it would be going to the bathroom? 

Gardening is apparently  dangerous sport, There needs to be more regulation. 

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Have read about this before.  But here's some interesting information on how Page recorded Bonzo's iconic drum riff/sound.  

What else can you say about the John Bonham drumbeat on “When the Levee Breaks”? Maybe you think it’s the ultimate example of power and restraint; maybe you marvel at how it fueled a classic Beastie Boys rap 15 years later; and maybe you think it began the greatest closing statement on any album in rock history.

You’d be right on all three counts, of course. But all that has been said in one form or another about the classic Led Zeppelin track from the band’s fourth (technically untitled) album. And everyone who’s heard it can relate to these reactions.

But the making of “When the Levee Breaks” is almost the equal of the track’s impact in the annals of Zep lore. And it begins with the work of Jimmy Page, who doesn’t always get the credit other producers (e.g., “fifth Beatle” George Martin) did for recording the entire Led Zeppelin oeuvre. 

When approaching “Levee” for the Led Zeppelin IV sessions, Page fell back on his battle-tested philosophy that “distance equals depth” while working far away from the studio settings other bands swore by.

John Bonham on drums
Led Zeppelin’s John Bonham performs onstage during the 1977 US tour. | Richard E. Aaron/Redferns
 

Before getting into the recording of “When the Levee Breaks,” you have to get a feel for the setting. For their previous album (Led Zeppelin III), the band had decamped to a former Headley (Hampshire, England) poorhouse from the 1790s that was converted to a residence in the late 1800s.

Known as Headley Grange, the band lived, worked, and recorded  III in the immense building using a mobile recording studio parked outside. And after doing some work on Led Zeppelin IV in London, Page and the group went back to Headley Grange.

 
That’s where tracks like “Black Dog” and “Four Sticks” came together. But deep into their work on the album, a delivery arrived containing a second drum kit for Bonham. Instead of halting their current session, they told the delivery crew to leave it in Headley Grange’s huge hallway.

After a while, Bonham went out to test the kit. And Page heard a sound unlike anything he’d heard on record. “The sound was huge because the [hall] was so cavernous,” he told Brad Tolinski in Light and Shade. “So we said, ‘We’re not going to take the drums out of here!'”

 
John Bonham sitting with Jimmy Page

John Bonham and Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin sit at a restaurant in Tokyo, 20 September 1971. |Koh Hasebe/Shinko Music/Getty Images

So with his powerhouse drummer pounding out the beat to “When the Levee Breaks” in a vast hallway of a country estate, Page had to figure out how to get the sound on tape. By then, he had Andy Johns (brother of Glyn, who’d done the debut Zep album) engineering.

According to Andy Johns (via Led Zeppelin: All the Songs), the sound resulted from experiments he made with Bonham one night when the band wrapped up an evening’s session. But either way, Johns hung microphones from the second floor of Headley Grange. Page said Johns made some modifications to the sound and they never had to mic the kick-drum.

This move continued Page’s philosophy of ambient miking for the drums. (Rather than putting microphones right on the instruments, he’d allow the sound to travel to another mic.) “Nobody was doing that,” he told Tolinski, before explaining his belief that drums “had to breathe.”

But recording the backing track was only part of the magic of “Levee,” which Page said he wanted “to make into a trance.” That required a special mixing technique — one which Glyn Johns heard and declared would never work on record.

After Page and Andy Johns had applied the phasing, panning, and a few other tricks at the end of “Levee,”, they played it for Glyn Johns. “You’ll never be able to cut it,” Page recalled Johns telling him (from a ’93 Guitar World interview). “Wrong again, Glyn,” Page declared with satisfaction.

https://www.cheatsheet.com/entertainment/when-the-levee-breaks-how-jimmy-page-recorded-john-bonhams-epic-drum-part.html/

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If Tommy announced the Who’s ascent to rock-band immortality, Live at Leeds was the headline’s exclamation point. The live album cemented their distinction as one of the world’s most powerful acts, yet it came together almost by accident.

The 1969 Tommy tour saw the Who performing to massive audiences across the globe, including a historic stop at Woodstock. Keenly aware of its popularity, and having seen the success of live albums from many rock contemporaries, the band decided to record its performances during the trek. By the end of 1969, the Who had recorded 30 shows in the U.S. and an additional eight in the U.K.

While the abundance of material seemed like a blessing at first, it was actually too much of a good thing. Poring through all the hours of music was a daunting task, one the band could not feasibly do considering the amount of time it would necessitate. Frustrated, Pete Townshend took a scorched earth approach; the guitarist instructed his audio engineer to burn all of the concert recordings. The Who would instead book two shows from which a live album would be constructed. Without the previous tapes to fall back on, the band was bravely performing without a net.

The group wanted to capture the ferocity of its live shows, something Tommy’s high-art concept had briefly taken them away from. “We were better known for doing Tommy than we were for all the rest of the stuff," bassist John Entwistle noted in the book The Complete Chronicle of the Who. “I mean, all the guitar smashing and stuff went completely out of the window. We’d turned into snob rock. We were the kind of band that Jackie Onassis would come and see.”

The band planned one concert for Feb. 14, 1970, at the University of Leeds, with a second the following day in Hull. As fate would have it, the Hull performance was plagued with technical problems. Thankfully, the Who needed only the first show to make history.

The Leeds concert saw the band play more than 30 songs, including the earlier hit “My Generation” and almost all of the songs from Tommy. More than 2,000 students - many of whom had been lining up since 6AM that day - filled the capacity of the University’s refectory. Their energy was palpable.

"The students there were a great audience for us,” Roger Daltrey later recalled to the BBC. “It was packed to the rafters and then some more. I heard there was a thousand fans on the roof!"

Keith Moon echoed similar sentiments. “We fed on the audience as much as they fed on us,” the drummer explained to the University’s student newspaper. “They were just too incredible.”

Though the Who initially planned on releasing a double live album from the set, they honed Live at Leeds to a powerful six-song LP. The track listing would go as follows: “Young Man Blues,” “Substitute,” “Summertime Blues,” “Shakin’ All Over,” “My Generation” and “Magic Bus.”

Originally released on May 23, 1970, Live at Leeds was quickly hailed as a triumph and has sealed its legacy as one of the Who's best albums and one of the greatest live records ever made. The complete Leeds and Hull shows were eventually released on various expanded editions of the album.

In celebration of Live at Leeds’ 50th anniversary, Collectionzz is releasing officially licensed concert posters for the University of Leeds concert. The images feature the faces of Daltrey, Townshend, Moon and Entwistle cloaked by the Union Jack. The design also includes the Who’s trippy logo, psychedelic trim and original concert details. Two versions of the poster are available: a glow-in-the-dark edition and a black metallic edition. They go on sale May 15 exclusively through the Collectionzz website.

 
Who-posters-1080.jpg?w=1080&h=720&q=75
Collectionzz



Read More: How the Who Recorded 'Live at Leeds' Without a Safety Net | https://ultimateclassicrock.com/who-live-at-leeds-safety-net/?utm_source=tsmclip&utm_medium=referral

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3 hours ago, jetstream23 said:

Pop culture and entertainment thread?  So like...Tik Tok videos?

K Camp Puppy GIF by TikTok

GIF by TikTok

animated the beatles GIF

Why not?  

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On 5/16/2020 at 4:49 PM, jetstream23 said:

Pop culture and entertainment thread?  So like...Tik Tok videos?

Pretty amazing. This thread so far is mostly classic rockers, they were a generation before me but we all grew up idolizing the likes of Floyd, Who, Zep, Stones, Dead.. etc.

Now they are a bunch of geezers. 

I dont follow pop culture much but is it producing anything equiviliant or is it just a bunch of trite easily digestible works marketed at the tiktok generation ?

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On 5/10/2020 at 10:15 AM, munchmemory said:

Have read about this before.  But here's some interesting information on how Page recorded Bonzo's iconic drum riff/sound.  

What else can you say about the John Bonham drumbeat on “When the Levee Breaks”? Maybe you think it’s the ultimate example of power and restraint; maybe you marvel at how it fueled a classic Beastie Boys rap 15 years later; and maybe you think it began the greatest closing statement on any album in rock history.

You’d be right on all three counts, of course. But all that has been said in one form or another about the classic Led Zeppelin track from the band’s fourth (technically untitled) album. And everyone who’s heard it can relate to these reactions.

But the making of “When the Levee Breaks” is almost the equal of the track’s impact in the annals of Zep lore. And it begins with the work of Jimmy Page, who doesn’t always get the credit other producers (e.g., “fifth Beatle” George Martin) did for recording the entire Led Zeppelin oeuvre. 

When approaching “Levee” for the Led Zeppelin IV sessions, Page fell back on his battle-tested philosophy that “distance equals depth” while working far away from the studio settings other bands swore by.

John Bonham on drums
Led Zeppelin’s John Bonham performs onstage during the 1977 US tour. | Richard E. Aaron/Redferns
 

Before getting into the recording of “When the Levee Breaks,” you have to get a feel for the setting. For their previous album (Led Zeppelin III), the band had decamped to a former Headley (Hampshire, England) poorhouse from the 1790s that was converted to a residence in the late 1800s.

Known as Headley Grange, the band lived, worked, and recorded  III in the immense building using a mobile recording studio parked outside. And after doing some work on Led Zeppelin IV in London, Page and the group went back to Headley Grange.

 
That’s where tracks like “Black Dog” and “Four Sticks” came together. But deep into their work on the album, a delivery arrived containing a second drum kit for Bonham. Instead of halting their current session, they told the delivery crew to leave it in Headley Grange’s huge hallway.

After a while, Bonham went out to test the kit. And Page heard a sound unlike anything he’d heard on record. “The sound was huge because the [hall] was so cavernous,” he told Brad Tolinski in Light and Shade. “So we said, ‘We’re not going to take the drums out of here!'”

 
John Bonham sitting with Jimmy Page

John Bonham and Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin sit at a restaurant in Tokyo, 20 September 1971. |Koh Hasebe/Shinko Music/Getty Images

So with his powerhouse drummer pounding out the beat to “When the Levee Breaks” in a vast hallway of a country estate, Page had to figure out how to get the sound on tape. By then, he had Andy Johns (brother of Glyn, who’d done the debut Zep album) engineering.

According to Andy Johns (via Led Zeppelin: All the Songs), the sound resulted from experiments he made with Bonham one night when the band wrapped up an evening’s session. But either way, Johns hung microphones from the second floor of Headley Grange. Page said Johns made some modifications to the sound and they never had to mic the kick-drum.

This move continued Page’s philosophy of ambient miking for the drums. (Rather than putting microphones right on the instruments, he’d allow the sound to travel to another mic.) “Nobody was doing that,” he told Tolinski, before explaining his belief that drums “had to breathe.”

But recording the backing track was only part of the magic of “Levee,” which Page said he wanted “to make into a trance.” That required a special mixing technique — one which Glyn Johns heard and declared would never work on record.

After Page and Andy Johns had applied the phasing, panning, and a few other tricks at the end of “Levee,”, they played it for Glyn Johns. “You’ll never be able to cut it,” Page recalled Johns telling him (from a ’93 Guitar World interview). “Wrong again, Glyn,” Page declared with satisfaction.

https://www.cheatsheet.com/entertainment/when-the-levee-breaks-how-jimmy-page-recorded-john-bonhams-epic-drum-part.html/

 

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43 minutes ago, CTM said:

Pretty amazing. This thread so far is mostly classic rockers, they were a generation before me but we all grew up idolizing the likes of Floyd, Who, Zep, Stones, Dead.. etc.

Now they are a bunch of geezers. 

I dont follow pop culture much but is it producing anything equiviliant or is it just a bunch of trite easily digestible works marketed at the tiktok generation ?

Lately whenever I watch any type of show with my family and they talk about current celebrities? I literally don’t know who 80% of them are, like not at all. They showed a compilation video of some dreadful Masked   show and of the 30 Performers  in it I knew I think three. John Sena was one of the three! Haha 

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5 minutes ago, CTM said:

Pretty amazing. This thread so far is mostly classic rockers, they were a generation before me but we all grew up idolizing the likes of Floyd, Who, Zep, Stones, Dead.. etc.

Now they are a bunch of geezers. 

I dont follow pop culture much but is it producing anything equiviliant or is it just a bunch of trite easily digestible works marketed at the tiktok generation ?

Probably my error in naming this thread.  I was trying to find a way to post articles/items on music and whatever else is going on in the entertainment world.

I agree that my music idols are either dead or have become geezers.   There are two eras in music/pop culture which I believe can never be equalled: The classic rock & roll era of 1956-58 (especially 1957) and the mid-60s to about 1974.  At least in my opinion, it's when all the greatest bands/artists emerged and produced the music everyone since has tried in one form or another to emulate.

 

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Following up on the "geezer" concept (he's referred to himself as such going back into the 70s), here's an interesting article about Pete Townshend's car collection.   With photos, it's a bit long to post.  But below is an excerpt with reference to one of the classic Who stories of Daltry laying out Pete with one punch.

Mercedes S600 Pullman (1965)

© Chris Morphet

20200514-townsend-11.jpg

When it was launched in 1963, the colossal Mercedes 600 became the most expensive car in the world. A favourite of dictators (Idi Amin, Saddam Hussein, Papa Doc Duvalier and Chairman Mao all had one), just 2,677 600s were ever made. Of those, 428 were Pullmans (limousines) and only 124 had six-doors. And that's what Pete Townshend. He loved the 600 so much he saved up for five years to be able to afford one. It was also the car (partly) responsible for Townshend getting flattened by The Who's frontman, Roger Daltrey

 

“I walked into the studio, having not slept for two days after doing the final mixes [for Quadrophenia],” Townshend told the Times in 2011. “John [Woolf, The Who’s production manager] and I had been in my big Mercedes limousine drinking brandy. Roger was in the studio, having waited for us for the last five hours. ‘We’ve done it!’ I shouted at him. ‘Yeah? Well, I’ve been here since one o’clock and I’m going.’ ‘You can’t ******* go!’ He pushed me out of the way. I spat at him and I got knocked out. When I came round an hour later my memory was gone for two days. He’s a one-punch man, Roger.” That must go down as one of The Who's biggest hits.

https://www.gq-magazine.co.uk/lifestyle/article/pete-townshend-cars

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That story about Page being in the drivers seat for the bonham drum sound is sketchy.

glen johns has always been given credit for his drum miking techniques. In fact the led zep technique is actually called the “glen johns” 3 mic method.

i dont believe page had much to do with it. 

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Speaking of pete townsend.....

what happened about 20 years or so ago? He was caught with child pornography on his laptop. It was news. He claimed he was searching out kid porn to report these sites to authorities.

then the story just went away. Odd

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4 minutes ago, HighPitch said:

That story about Page being in the drivers seat for the bonham drum sound is sketchy.

glen johns has always been given credit for his drum miking techniques. In fact the led zep technique is actually called the “glen johns” 3 mic method.

i dont believe page had much to do with it. 

Page is acknowledged as the architect of the Zeppelin sound from start to finish.  He pioneered many overdubbing techniques which were copied by by everyone else.  And his placement of mics to record drums before "Levee" is documented.

BTW, your "belief" has nothing to do with it.  Facts are facts.

2 minutes ago, HighPitch said:

Speaking of pete townsend.....

what happened about 20 years or so ago? He was caught with child pornography on his laptop. It was news. He claimed he was searching out kid porn to report these sites to authorities.

then the story just went away. Odd

They did not "just go away".  The matter was investigated and Townshend was cleared of wrongdoing.  

Following a four-month investigation, Who guitarist Pete Townshend was cleared of charges related to child pornography on May 7, 2003, after examination of his computers equipment proved there had been no downloaded images of child porn.

Townshend had been arrested on January 13 of that year, after he used a credit card to view a child porn website as part of personal research while writing his autobiography. Townshend claimed he had been sexually abused as a child himself.

"The police have unconditionally accepted that these were my motives in looking at this site and that there was no other nefarious purpose," said Townshend in an official press statement. "I accept that I was wrong to access this site and that by doing so, I broke the law." He addressed the topic further in his 2012 autobiography, 'Who I Am.'

Following a four-month investigation, Who guitarist Pete Townshend was cleared of charges related to child pornography on May 7, 2003, after examination of his computers equipment proved there had been no downloaded images of child porn.

Townshend had been arrested on January 13 of that year, after he used a credit card to view a child porn website as part of personal research while writing his autobiography. Townshend claimed he had been sexually abused as a child himself.

"The police have unconditionally accepted that these were my motives in looking at this site and that there was no other nefarious purpose," said Townshend in an official press statement. "I accept that I was wrong to access this site and that by doing so, I broke the law." He addressed the topic further in his 2012 autobiography, 'Who I AM'.

 

"I was trying to prove that credit card companies were taking money for child porn websites," he told the Today Show in 2012. "I didn't enter a website, I didn't look at images. A couple of us were campaigning and we gave it up in the end because it seemed so futile."

It wasn't until the release of 'Who I Am,' and the media interviews surrounding it, that Townshend has been able to fully address the topic to the press and the public. "I feel now, I can come and kind of face you."

"More stuff has come up," he continued. "A couple of the guys who were on the investigating force have given me letters to say that they never believed, and there was no evidence. A guy called Duncan Campbell got hold of the actual hard drive and said there is irrefutable proof that I didn't enter [the website]."

Townshend was, however, placed on a national register of sex offenders by London's Metropolitan Police due to his refusal to to go to court. "A forensic investigator found that I hadn't entered the website, but nonetheless, by the time the charges came to be presented to me, it was five months...I was exhausted. I felt that if I went to court I would be offering myself up for sacrifice."



Read More: 10 Years Ago: Pete Townshend Cleared On Child Porn Charges | https://ultimateclassicrock.com/pete-townshend-cleared-child-porn-charges/?utm_source=tsmclip&utm_medium=referral



 

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Been suffering with some sciatic pain the last few weeks.  Have looked up some stretching exercises which have helped.  This one  showed up a minute ago on my YouTube recommendations.  Man, have I been looking in the wrong places.  lol

At about 3:00 in the video the last thing most of us would be thinking about is back pain or stretching.  She's so o gorgeous and makes me think of what might have been for Jerry in the "Comedian" episode of Seinfeld.

 

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9 hours ago, munchmemory said:

Page is acknowledged as the architect of the Zeppelin sound from start to finish.  He pioneered many overdubbing techniques which were copied by by everyone else.  And his placement of mics to record drums before "Levee" is documented.

BTW, your "belief" has nothing to do with it.  Facts are facts.

They did not "just go away".  The matter was investigated and Townshend was cleared of wrongdoing.  

Following a four-month investigation, Who guitarist Pete Townshend was cleared of charges related to child pornography on May 7, 2003, after examination of his computers equipment proved there had been no downloaded images of child porn.

Townshend had been arrested on January 13 of that year, after he used a credit card to view a child porn website as part of personal research while writing his autobiography. Townshend claimed he had been sexually abused as a child himself.

"The police have unconditionally accepted that these were my motives in looking at this site and that there was no other nefarious purpose," said Townshend in an official press statement. "I accept that I was wrong to access this site and that by doing so, I broke the law." He addressed the topic further in his 2012 autobiography, 'Who I Am.'

Following a four-month investigation, Who guitarist Pete Townshend was cleared of charges related to child pornography on May 7, 2003, after examination of his computers equipment proved there had been no downloaded images of child porn.

Townshend had been arrested on January 13 of that year, after he used a credit card to view a child porn website as part of personal research while writing his autobiography. Townshend claimed he had been sexually abused as a child himself.

"The police have unconditionally accepted that these were my motives in looking at this site and that there was no other nefarious purpose," said Townshend in an official press statement. "I accept that I was wrong to access this site and that by doing so, I broke the law." He addressed the topic further in his 2012 autobiography, 'Who I AM'.

 

"I was trying to prove that credit card companies were taking money for child porn websites," he told the Today Show in 2012. "I didn't enter a website, I didn't look at images. A couple of us were campaigning and we gave it up in the end because it seemed so futile."

It wasn't until the release of 'Who I Am,' and the media interviews surrounding it, that Townshend has been able to fully address the topic to the press and the public. "I feel now, I can come and kind of face you."

"More stuff has come up," he continued. "A couple of the guys who were on the investigating force have given me letters to say that they never believed, and there was no evidence. A guy called Duncan Campbell got hold of the actual hard drive and said there is irrefutable proof that I didn't enter [the website]."

Townshend was, however, placed on a national register of sex offenders by London's Metropolitan Police due to his refusal to to go to court. "A forensic investigator found that I hadn't entered the website, but nonetheless, by the time the charges came to be presented to me, it was five months...I was exhausted. I felt that if I went to court I would be offering myself up for sacrifice."



Read More: 10 Years Ago: Pete Townshend Cleared On Child Porn Charges | https://ultimateclassicrock.com/pete-townshend-cleared-child-porn-charges/?utm_source=tsmclip&utm_medium=referral



 

Ok i know my belief has nothing to do with it but i was unaware. Not sure why this is called the glyn john miking technique and not the jimmy page miking technique. Also, page was a fairly notorious riff stealer, and thats fairly well documented.

as far as townshend.... ok he was cleared. Tell you what man my creditcard never was charged at a child porn site. So thats that. Its so odd.

who is the dude in your avatar

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16 hours ago, CTM said:

Pretty amazing. This thread so far is mostly classic rockers, they were a generation before me but we all grew up idolizing the likes of Floyd, Who, Zep, Stones, Dead.. etc.

Now they are a bunch of geezers. 

I dont follow pop culture much but is it producing anything equiviant or is it just a bunch of trite easily digestible works marketed at the tiktok generation ?

interesting take about the geezers

It all changed before Woodstock. Popular music went from "Put another dime in the juke box baby and dance with me" to "'Scuse me while I kiss the sky". To be honest, most of the audience was too ... uh … mellow to get up and dance and just started listening to the music. Far out man, Fillmore East tonight. Hey, that guy can play really well, Hey he's fast. Hey, he's faster. Hey that guy playing Bach on the pipe organ is interesting. Hey what's that time signature? Hey, I gotta learn to do that. Guess the four chords won't be enough anymore. 

Then Alan R Pearlman and Robert Moog came along, We were floored and we wanted more … and more and more. You couldn't walk into a Sam Ash (or Gracins or Rudy's or any store on 48th St) without being shoulder to shoulder with a crowd of guys your age. Everyone wanted to improve their sound, their skills and everyone was going to be the NBT (next big thing) and take it all to another level. 

Many bands became musicians first and sang only as augmentation, often only to sell records. You can do waaaaaay more with instruments than the human voice. A whole generation of people were interested in improving their musical chops and composition skills. Radio such as WNEW-FM was glad to play new and innovative instrumental music and the kids of the time ate it up. There was more than just rhythm and blues. Players were more skilled and educated. Other types of skilled music were researched practiced and incorporated into the popular culture. Think Emerson's classical contribution or "Miles' Babies" knocking everyone through concrete walls with jazz-rock fusion. You had big selling albums like Wakeman's Six Wives which was basically classical using modern instrumentation. You had jazz, real blues and classical players playing the same venues as the rock bands and received the same young audience. It made you listen to Stravinsky and Coltrane and Ives and Parker, It introduced you to B.B. and Junior and Heifetz and Copeland and we wanted more … and more and more. So since "some" musicians have a bit of an ego problem, when they heard the Mahavishnus and King Crimsons of the time play, they went home and PRACTICED, hard. Really hard. Really really hard. That produced the Vais and Satrianis of the next generation. When they heard new and different things they went home, listened to it, learned it, built on it. brought it higher and higher. Possibilities were endless. 

So what happened? 

It got too hard for the masses. It took real talent to keep up and very few have it. I don't mean just playing, but listening too. It takes skills to listen. I mean, who among us heard Birds of Fire and understood it the very first time through?

So there was a revolution, called Punk. Easy stuff played by what amounted to musical idiots. Then the world ended as we knew it. Movie screens all over showed John Travolta swaying down 86th St with paint cans in his hand to Bee Gees crap and it all went back to "Put another dime in the juke box baby and dance with me" or at least the late 70's version of it. The two worst things you can do to music is make it danceable (negates any change in time signature and for that matter any complicated one) and singable (takes away counterpoint and improvisation). Even Floyd sold out with the Wall and Genesis post Gabriel? Waste of high level skills in exchange for money.

Sure there was still some high level stuff being produced but it had less and less of an audience and less and less of a place to play it.

It got worse. Rap and hip hop involves little or no technical musicality. Kids stopped playing or wanted to play. There was little to aspire to. Popular music became dance and sing bands (if you can call people just singing "bands") and badly spoken word, all quantized and autotuned to the point of banality. Then it was all about video games and "Rock Star" rather the pain and dedication it takes to learn to play. All my 20 something nieces and nephews screw up their faces and say "old people music, ugh" with no interest in hearing what came before. We were eating up stuff decades and centuries old and understood the importance of it. 

Today there are no albums to learn from, just simple chords over souless vocal single songs downloaded to phones. Show up at Sam Ash and you have the run of the place passing by the other geezer who was shoulder to shoulder to you back on 48th St in the day. You go see the guys who are left that could still bring it and no one there has not looked into Medicare Advantage programs.

Innovation, virtuosity, inspiration has all been replaced with a giant void.

The future? There will be music, but it will be made on computers by computers, It will have no soul, feeling, virtuosity or innovation. It will inspire no one except those who write code. 

No sadness here, just an observation. It got too good, too hard and took too much effort in an effortless world, Doomed to fail at the end. I'm just glad to have seen it and in a small way be part of it when it was truly important. 

When we are gone, it will all be gone forever so be nice to us while we keep it alive, not only in our hearts but surprisingly in threads in this very forum by some very knowledgeable and deeply cool posters.

 

Alexa … play "One Word" 

 

BTW, an aside, GEEZERS RULE !

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9 minutes ago, The Crimson King said:

interesting take about the geezers

It all changed before Woodstock. Popular music went from "Put another dime in the juke box baby and dance with me" to "'Scuse me while I kiss the sky". To be honest, most of the audience was too ... uh … mellow to get up and dance and just started listening to the music. Far out man, Fillmore East tonight. Hey, that guy can play really well, Hey he's fast. Hey, he's faster. Hey that guy playing Bach on the pipe organ is interesting. Hey what's that time signature? Hey, I gotta learn to do that. Guess the four chords won't be enough anymore. 

Then Alan R Pearlman and Robert Moog came along, We were floored and we wanted more … and more and more. You couldn't walk into a Sam Ash (or Gracins or Rudy's or any store on 48th St) without being shoulder to shoulder with a crowd of guys your age. Everyone wanted to improve their sound, their skills and everyone was going to be the NBT (next big thing) and take it all to another level. 

Many bands became musicians first and sang only as augmentation, often only to sell records. You can do waaaaaay more with instruments than the human voice. A whole generation of people were interested in improving their musical chops and composition skills. Radio such as WNEW-FM was glad to play new and innovative instrumental music and the kids of the time ate it up. There was more than just rhythm and blues. Players were more skilled and educated. Other types of skilled music were researched practiced and incorporated into the popular culture. Think Emerson's classical contribution or "Miles' Babies" knocking everyone through concrete walls with jazz-rock fusion. You had big selling albums like Wakeman's Six Wives which was basically classical using modern instrumentation. You had jazz, real blues and classical players played the same venues as the rock bands and received the same young audience. It made you listen to Stravinsky and Coltrane and Ives and Parker, It introduced you to B.B. and Junior and Heifetz and Copeland and we wanted more … and more and more. So since "some" musicians have a bit of an ego problem, when they heard the Mahavishnus and King Crimsons of the time play, they went home and PRACTICED, hard. Really hard. Really really hard. That produced the Vais and Satrianis of the next generation. When they heard new and different things they went home, listened to it, learned it, built on it. brought it higher and higher. Possibilities were endless. 

So what happened? 

It got too hard for the masses. It took real talent to keep up and very few have it. I don't mean just playing, but listening too. It takes skills to listen. I mean, who among us heard Birds of Fire and understood it the very first time they heard it?

So there was a revolution, called Punk. Easy stuff played by that amounted to musical idiots. Then the world ended as we knew it. Movie screens all over showed John Travolta swaying down 86th St with paint cans in his hand to Bee Gees crap and it all went back to "Put another dime in the juke box baby and dance with me" or at least the late 70's version of it. Even Floyd sold out with the Wall and Genesis post Gabriel? Waste of high level skills in exchange for money.

Sure there was still some high level stuff being produced but it had less and less of an audience and less and less of a place to play it.

It got worse. Rap and hip hop involves little or no technical musicality. Kids stopped playing or wanted to play. There was little to aspire to. Popular music became dance and sing bands (if you can call people just singing "bands") and badly spoken word, all quantized and autotuned to the point of banality. Then it was all about video games and "Rock Star" rather the pain and dedication it takes to learn to play. All my 20 something nieces and nephews screw up their faces and say "old people music, ugh" with no interest in hearing what came before. We were eating up stuff decades and centuries old. 

Today there are no albums to learn from, just simple chords over souless vocal single songs downloaded to phones. Show up at Sam Ash and you have the run of the place passing by the other geezer who was shoulder to shoulder to you back on 48th St in the day. You go see the guys who are left that could still bring it and no one there has not looked into Medicare Advantage programs.

Innovation, virtuosity, inspiration has all been replaced with a giant void.

The future? There will be music, but it will be made on computers by computers, It will have no soul, feeling, virtuosity or innovation. It will inspire no one except those who write code. 

No sadness here, just an observation. It got too good, too hard and took too much effort in an effortless world, Doomed to fail at the end. I'm just glad to have seen it and in a small way be part of it when it was truly important. 

When we are gone, it will all be gone forever so be nice to us while we keep it alive, not only in our hearts but surprisingly in threads in this very forum by some very knowledgeable and deeply cool posters.

Alexa, play "One Word" 

BTW, an aside, GEEZERS RULE !

This was far too captivating to be on a Jets forum. 

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On 5/16/2020 at 1:10 PM, munchmemory said:

If Tommy announced the Who’s ascent to rock-band immortality, Live at Leeds was the headline’s exclamation point. The live album cemented their distinction as one of the world’s most powerful acts, yet it came together almost by accident.

The 1969 Tommy tour saw the Who performing to massive audiences across the globe, including a historic stop at Woodstock. Keenly aware of its popularity, and having seen the success of live albums from many rock contemporaries, the band decided to record its performances during the trek. By the end of 1969, the Who had recorded 30 shows in the U.S. and an additional eight in the U.K.

While the abundance of material seemed like a blessing at first, it was actually too much of a good thing. Poring through all the hours of music was a daunting task, one the band could not feasibly do considering the amount of time it would necessitate. Frustrated, Pete Townshend took a scorched earth approach; the guitarist instructed his audio engineer to burn all of the concert recordings. The Who would instead book two shows from which a live album would be constructed. Without the previous tapes to fall back on, the band was bravely performing without a net.

The group wanted to capture the ferocity of its live shows, something Tommy’s high-art concept had briefly taken them away from. “We were better known for doing Tommy than we were for all the rest of the stuff," bassist John Entwistle noted in the book The Complete Chronicle of the Who. “I mean, all the guitar smashing and stuff went completely out of the window. We’d turned into snob rock. We were the kind of band that Jackie Onassis would come and see.”

The band planned one concert for Feb. 14, 1970, at the University of Leeds, with a second the following day in Hull. As fate would have it, the Hull performance was plagued with technical problems. Thankfully, the Who needed only the first show to make history.

The Leeds concert saw the band play more than 30 songs, including the earlier hit “My Generation” and almost all of the songs from Tommy. More than 2,000 students - many of whom had been lining up since 6AM that day - filled the capacity of the University’s refectory. Their energy was palpable.

"The students there were a great audience for us,” Roger Daltrey later recalled to the BBC. “It was packed to the rafters and then some more. I heard there was a thousand fans on the roof!"

Keith Moon echoed similar sentiments. “We fed on the audience as much as they fed on us,” the drummer explained to the University’s student newspaper. “They were just too incredible.”

Though the Who initially planned on releasing a double live album from the set, they honed Live at Leeds to a powerful six-song LP. The track listing would go as follows: “Young Man Blues,” “Substitute,” “Summertime Blues,” “Shakin’ All Over,” “My Generation” and “Magic Bus.”

Originally released on May 23, 1970, Live at Leeds was quickly hailed as a triumph and has sealed its legacy as one of the Who's best albums and one of the greatest live records ever made. The complete Leeds and Hull shows were eventually released on various expanded editions of the album.

In celebration of Live at Leeds’ 50th anniversary, Collectionzz is releasing officially licensed concert posters for the University of Leeds concert. The images feature the faces of Daltrey, Townshend, Moon and Entwistle cloaked by the Union Jack. The design also includes the Who’s trippy logo, psychedelic trim and original concert details. Two versions of the poster are available: a glow-in-the-dark edition and a black metallic edition. They go on sale May 15 exclusively through the Collectionzz website.

 
Who-posters-1080.jpg?w=1080&h=720&q=75
Collectionzz



Read More: How the Who Recorded 'Live at Leeds' Without a Safety Net | https://ultimateclassicrock.com/who-live-at-leeds-safety-net/?utm_source=tsmclip&utm_medium=referral

Original vinyl only had 6 tracks, but later versions on cassette and CD had 14. I've only owned the 14 cut version; it's fantastic hard rock. 

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12 hours ago, Bugg said:

Original vinyl only had 6 tracks, but later versions on cassette and CD had 14. I've only owned the 14 cut version; it's fantastic hard rock. 

I had the original record when it came out.  We never knew there were more songs from that gig.  And that they were assembled on the original Live at Leeds in the wrong order.

If you have not done so, the Live at Hull recordings are worth a listen.  Similarities for sure, but definitely some surprising differences.  Listen to Pete's guitar twang here:

 

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The Tuning that Flummoxed Pete Townshend and David Gilmour

English Beat and General Public guitarist Dave Wakeling is best known for his hit “Save It for Later,” a bouncy, infectious skapop gem. The song’s tuning, DADAAD, or “Dad-Odd,” as he says, not only gave rise to the tune’s catchy riff, it also managed to stump a couple of Wakeling’s heroes, who are pretty good guitarists in their own right.

In this recently unearthed 2011 GP interview, Wakeling discussed the origins of the tuning, and how it flummoxed these two guitarists - two of the most acclaimed and commercially successful in rock history.

“The tuning was meant to be DADGAD but I screwed up,” he joked, “but it has a nice sort of Celtic poignancy, I think. Anyway, one day Pete Townshend phones me and says, ‘I’m sitting here with David Gilmour, and we’re having a bit of trouble finding your tuning for 'Save It for Later.'

"I think it was the most wonderful moment of my life as a guitar player. Those three-minute pop explosions of the Who were a big part of my early life. Then, a bit later, Ummagumma and records like that took over and the sounds of Pink Floyd were very important. 

"So here are my two heroes, sitting around trying to learn my song and then calling me to ask about the tuning. So I said, ‘No. Work it out yourselves lads. There’s no shortcuts - ask Robert Johnson!’ But of course I willingly gave up the tuning. 

"However, I’ve watched Pete very carefully on the Youtube and I think he’s still got DADGAD going - I don’t think he went for it. But he’s that clever that he can stretch four or six frets. It’s not many people who get to give a guitar lesson to Pete Townshend and David Gilmour, and how much sweeter that it’s somebody who can’t actually play the guitar?”

https://www.guitarplayer.com/news/the-tuning-that-flummoxed-pete-townshend-and-david-gilmour

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On 5/19/2020 at 12:07 PM, munchmemory said:

Been suffering with some sciatic pain the last few weeks.  Have looked up some stretching exercises which have helped.  This one  showed up a minute ago on my YouTube recommendations.  Man, have I been looking in the wrong places.  lol

At about 3:00 in the video the last thing most of us would be thinking about is back pain or stretching.  She's so o gorgeous and makes me think of what might have been for Jerry in the "Comedian" episode of Seinfeld.

 

I had suffered from this a couple of years ago due to cycling - this actually might be helpful.

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1 hour ago, peebag said:

I had suffered from this a couple of years ago due to cycling - this actually might be helpful.

Glad I posted it then.  Hope it helps.  

She has a bunch of videos I perused after that initial one.  She's a goddess and the locations are beautiful.  Plus she seems to know her stuff.

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We'll need to hit up [mention=28854]Tezza[/mention] for accuracy.  
 
Haha anytime mate I can teach you some Scottish patter as well!
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On 5/21/2020 at 4:39 PM, munchmemory said:

 

Yeah I have hard time believing this will be anything but really bad.

Not hard to beat the abomination that was released but all of a sudden people seem to think Snyder's universe was fantastic. Batman vs Superman was a mess and just made a Justice League sequel even more difficult. Hard to be too excited for Darkseid when you see what they done with Lex Luthor.

I will still watch out of curiosity and I'm happy for Snyder. Just think a lot of fans are building this up to be a serious disappointment. 

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On 5/20/2020 at 1:31 AM, The Crimson King said:

interesting take about the geezers

It all changed before Woodstock. Popular music went from "Put another dime in the juke box baby and dance with me" to "'Scuse me while I kiss the sky". To be honest, most of the audience was too ... uh … mellow to get up and dance and just started listening to the music. Far out man, Fillmore East tonight. Hey, that guy can play really well, Hey he's fast. Hey, he's faster. Hey that guy playing Bach on the pipe organ is interesting. Hey what's that time signature? Hey, I gotta learn to do that. Guess the four chords won't be enough anymore. 

Then Alan R Pearlman and Robert Moog came along, We were floored and we wanted more … and more and more. You couldn't walk into a Sam Ash (or Gracins or Rudy's or any store on 48th St) without being shoulder to shoulder with a crowd of guys your age. Everyone wanted to improve their sound, their skills and everyone was going to be the NBT (next big thing) and take it all to another level. 

Many bands became musicians first and sang only as augmentation, often only to sell records. You can do waaaaaay more with instruments than the human voice. A whole generation of people were interested in improving their musical chops and composition skills. Radio such as WNEW-FM was glad to play new and innovative instrumental music and the kids of the time ate it up. There was more than just rhythm and blues. Players were more skilled and educated. Other types of skilled music were researched practiced and incorporated into the popular culture. Think Emerson's classical contribution or "Miles' Babies" knocking everyone through concrete walls with jazz-rock fusion. You had big selling albums like Wakeman's Six Wives which was basically classical using modern instrumentation. You had jazz, real blues and classical players playing the same venues as the rock bands and received the same young audience. It made you listen to Stravinsky and Coltrane and Ives and Parker, It introduced you to B.B. and Junior and Heifetz and Copeland and we wanted more … and more and more. So since "some" musicians have a bit of an ego problem, when they heard the Mahavishnus and King Crimsons of the time play, they went home and PRACTICED, hard. Really hard. Really really hard. That produced the Vais and Satrianis of the next generation. When they heard new and different things they went home, listened to it, learned it, built on it. brought it higher and higher. Possibilities were endless. 

So what happened? 

It got too hard for the masses. It took real talent to keep up and very few have it. I don't mean just playing, but listening too. It takes skills to listen. I mean, who among us heard Birds of Fire and understood it the very first time through?

So there was a revolution, called Punk. Easy stuff played by what amounted to musical idiots. Then the world ended as we knew it. Movie screens all over showed John Travolta swaying down 86th St with paint cans in his hand to Bee Gees crap and it all went back to "Put another dime in the juke box baby and dance with me" or at least the late 70's version of it. The two worst things you can do to music is make it danceable (negates any change in time signature and for that matter any complicated one) and singable (takes away counterpoint and improvisation). Even Floyd sold out with the Wall and Genesis post Gabriel? Waste of high level skills in exchange for money.

Sure there was still some high level stuff being produced but it had less and less of an audience and less and less of a place to play it.

It got worse. Rap and hip hop involves little or no technical musicality. Kids stopped playing or wanted to play. There was little to aspire to. Popular music became dance and sing bands (if you can call people just singing "bands") and badly spoken word, all quantized and autotuned to the point of banality. Then it was all about video games and "Rock Star" rather the pain and dedication it takes to learn to play. All my 20 something nieces and nephews screw up their faces and say "old people music, ugh" with no interest in hearing what came before. We were eating up stuff decades and centuries old and understood the importance of it. 

Today there are no albums to learn from, just simple chords over souless vocal single songs downloaded to phones. Show up at Sam Ash and you have the run of the place passing by the other geezer who was shoulder to shoulder to you back on 48th St in the day. You go see the guys who are left that could still bring it and no one there has not looked into Medicare Advantage programs.

Innovation, virtuosity, inspiration has all been replaced with a giant void.

The future? There will be music, but it will be made on computers by computers, It will have no soul, feeling, virtuosity or innovation. It will inspire no one except those who write code. 

No sadness here, just an observation. It got too good, too hard and took too much effort in an effortless world, Doomed to fail at the end. I'm just glad to have seen it and in a small way be part of it when it was truly important. 

When we are gone, it will all be gone forever so be nice to us while we keep it alive, not only in our hearts but surprisingly in threads in this very forum by some very knowledgeable and deeply cool posters.

 

Alexa … play "One Word" 

 

BTW, an aside, GEEZERS RULE !

season 13 GIF

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Cool story involving Zappa, Steve Vai and Eddie Van Halen.  Nice to read that all these guys were/are fans of Allan Holdsworth, who is a guitar genius.

A little birdie [named Dweezil] told me that you, Frank Zappa, and Eddie Van Halen jammed at one point. Is that true and how did that come to be?

"Yeah, well, it was kind of interesting. I went to see Allan Holdsworth at The Roxy and this was right at the peak of the Van Halen craze, and Edward [Van Halen] came out on stage because he was a big Holdsworth fan and started jamming and we were all like, 'Holy sh*t! There's Edward!'

"Somehow, I weaseled my way backstage because, at the time, I had pretty much just arrived in LA; I was working with Frank, but I wasn't known by anybody.

"I had an opportunity to talk with Edward backstage at The Roxy and I told him I worked with Frank, and he was a fan, so I told him if he ever wanted to meet Frank to let me know and I gave him my number.

"I thought, 'Edward Van Halen isn't going to call me,' and I went out the next day and came home and my roommate says, 'Edward Van Halen called and wanted to meet Frank so I gave him Frank's phone number,' and I was like, 'Oh no! You can't be giving out Frank Zappa's phone number!'

"The moment he says that - the phone rings and it's Frank, and he says, 'Hey sport...' I go, 'What's up Frank?' He says, 'Come on up, Eddie Van Halen is here.' So I hung up the phone and went over to his house – Edward was there and it was fantastic.

"Oddly enough, he lived like a mile away from Frank and while we were there, Edward ran out, ran home, and came back with the new Van Halen record - I think it was [1982's] 'Diver Down.'

"So we listened to it and, of course, at Frank's studio there are just tons of instruments, so Edward started playing and then Frank started playing and then I started playing. It wasn't a song, it was just jamming. It was a lot of fun, it went on for a while."

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/news/interviews/steve_vai_explains_why_he_left_zappas_band_recalls_how_frank_reacted_to_eddie_van_halen.html

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13 minutes ago, munchmemory said:

Cool story involving Zappa, Steve Vai and Eddie Van Halen.  Nice to read that all these guys were/are fans of Allan Holdsworth, who is a guitar genius.

A little birdie [named Dweezil] told me that you, Frank Zappa, and Eddie Van Halen jammed at one point. Is that true and how did that come to be?

"Yeah, well, it was kind of interesting. I went to see Allan Holdsworth at The Roxy and this was right at the peak of the Van Halen craze, and Edward [Van Halen] came out on stage because he was a big Holdsworth fan and started jamming and we were all like, 'Holy sh*t! There's Edward!'

"Somehow, I weaseled my way backstage because, at the time, I had pretty much just arrived in LA; I was working with Frank, but I wasn't known by anybody.

"I had an opportunity to talk with Edward backstage at The Roxy and I told him I worked with Frank, and he was a fan, so I told him if he ever wanted to meet Frank to let me know and I gave him my number.

"I thought, 'Edward Van Halen isn't going to call me,' and I went out the next day and came home and my roommate says, 'Edward Van Halen called and wanted to meet Frank so I gave him Frank's phone number,' and I was like, 'Oh no! You can't be giving out Frank Zappa's phone number!'

"The moment he says that - the phone rings and it's Frank, and he says, 'Hey sport...' I go, 'What's up Frank?' He says, 'Come on up, Eddie Van Halen is here.' So I hung up the phone and went over to his house – Edward was there and it was fantastic.

"Oddly enough, he lived like a mile away from Frank and while we were there, Edward ran out, ran home, and came back with the new Van Halen record - I think it was [1982's] 'Diver Down.'

"So we listened to it and, of course, at Frank's studio there are just tons of instruments, so Edward started playing and then Frank started playing and then I started playing. It wasn't a song, it was just jamming. It was a lot of fun, it went on for a while."

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/news/interviews/steve_vai_explains_why_he_left_zappas_band_recalls_how_frank_reacted_to_eddie_van_halen.html

Post of the Week button, not enough … add some enthusiastic applause from here !

Dweezil tells part of this story in concert. He said he was a kid and the one who answered the phone. VH came over and he was star struck. Funny because he's Frank's kid, who to him was just his Dad (at the time).

In the story, he does not mention Vai. I figure that as a Californian he is jealous of the amazing talent that comes out of Nassau County :)  

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