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From PFT: 

FOX tries out fake crowd noise for Bundesliga soccer

Posted by Mike Florio on May 26, 2020, 1:01 PM EDT

FOX has taken a big step closer to using fake crowd noise for fan-free football.

Currently airing on FS1 is a Bundesliga soccer match between Borussia Dortmund and Bayern Munich. The stadium is empty, but the broadcast include traditional soccer sounds, from the persistent dull rumble to scattered chants.

The game is scoreless, so there’s not yet been a chance to hear how FOX will handle the reaction to a goal.

It all sounds natural, until the camera angle inevitably shows the thousands of empty seats in the venue.

FOX and other networks reportedly are considering fake crowd noise for NFL broadcasts this season, if games don’t include fans in the stands. 

_______________________________________________

I think fake noise would be more distracting than not. I think they'd be wiser to take advantage of the lack of crowds and listen in on what players and coaches are saying. A lot of fans might find themselves gaining some more insight into the game. 

But the bold above is what I'd really question. How do they fake crowd reactions to big hits, missed catches, turnovers, TDs, etc.? Do they put the game on a delay? Or would the crowd sounds just not match the action on the field? Either way, I think it's dumb.

I also prefer my sitcoms without a laugh track. Perhaps an apt metaphor for a Jet fan. 

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3 hours ago, AFJF said:

If you're the league and trying to play games and keep things as genuine as possible, do you consider pumping crowd noise in to stadiums to create some of the elements teams would actually face on game day?

I can't imagine a game in complete silence and offense/defense being able to perfectly hear everything opposing players/coaches are saying.

They should do it like the Korean Baseball broadcasts.  Pumped in crowd buzz.  Just the sound of people in the stands.  No fake cheers for plays, just that underlying buzz that makes it sound like humans in the building 

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2 hours ago, IndianaJet said:

After looking at some of the pictures of various scenes around the country this weekend, I'm now convinced stadiums will see normal sized crowds if they allow fans in.  People just don't seem to care.

I suspect the NFL will allow fans in the stands, with very little social distancing with a request to wear a mask.

They apparently did it in 1918....they'll do it in 2020.

georgia_tech_1918_football.jpg?itok=5gth

Yes they did it in 1918.....and 675,000 people died

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If someone doesn't introduce "virtual tickets" as a means to add revenue with Virtual Reality its a major missed opportunity in my opinion.  VR has been experimenting with live sports and entertainment for a couple years now (especially with basketball/baseball and with the accessibility of higher quality headsets like the Oculus Quest and Valve Index for PC and better cameras/resolutions for 360 degree capture.  It just makes sense to pilot virtual tickets where you pick a seat in the stadium and watch the game as if you were actually there.  They could charge different prices on the quality of the seat as well as sell the same seats to different people as no one is physically occupying the space.  Add in actual social communications between avatars in different "instances" of the game and you have actual proximity stadium noise in VR.  

just a little VR rant I've been thinking about recently lol

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39 minutes ago, kevinc855 said:

Yes they did it in 1918.....and 675,000 people died

Oh...I'm not saying it is the right thing to do....I'm just saying it's gonna happen.

You won't catch me at a game for a very long time.

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6 hours ago, AFJF said:

If you're the league and trying to play games and keep things as genuine as possible, do you consider pumping crowd noise in to stadiums to create some of the elements teams would actually face on game day?

I can't imagine a game in complete silence and offense/defense being able to perfectly hear everything opposing players/coaches are saying.

It's how UFC events have been going down and it's actually pretty cool. Hearing what all the coaches are yelling out and hearing every single little step, I dunno, it's a new way of enjoying sports and I have to say I have been a fan.

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4 minutes ago, JETSfaninNE said:

If someone doesn't introduce "virtual tickets" as a means to add revenue with Virtual Reality its a major missed opportunity in my opinion.  VR has been experimenting with live sports and entertainment for a couple years now (especially with basketball/baseball and with the accessibility of higher quality headsets like the Oculus Quest and Valve Index for PC and better cameras/resolutions for 360 degree capture.  It just makes sense to pilot virtual tickets where you pick a seat in the stadium and watch the game as if you were actually there.  They could charge different prices on the quality of the seat as well as sell the same seats to different people as no one is physically occupying the space.  Add in actual social communications between avatars in different "instances" of the game and you have actual proximity stadium noise in VR.  

just a little VR rant I've been thinking about recently lol

Not a bad idea in theory. It could be a good compromise between people going to the game and staying at home safely to watch on T.V., and would offer an increase in revenue for the NFL if fan attendance is limited, although there are a few wrinkles I see.

1. How widespread is VR use really? Do enough people have these for it to be worth the NFL to invest time/money into using this technology? VR is quite expensive, as far as I've seen. At least, any that's reliable and of good quality. Not to mention, the sickness it can give some people.

2. Also, I gotta believe this would be only temporary until the stadiums are back at full-capacity. Why charge a lesser price for a seat for "virtual ticket" when you can charge full price to have a real butt sit in that seat and spend money at the concessions? Or, if they charge the same price, would enough fans opt to pay for a virtual seat when they could pay the same price to actually be there? I'm sure a few would, but only a small percentage, and even, then, the stadium is loosing out on those concession sales. The only way I'd see it working is if they charged more money for the VR experience, while factoring in average concession sales per person into the ticket. Even then, I don't see many takers, so I question the long-term financial viability for such an investment on the NFL's part.

3. Thinking about the actual implementation: they'd have to construct some sort of network to support this in a very short time (one that would, likely, as I mentioned above, only be temporary). Do-able, but probably costly, and not without a lot of bugs. What happens if the coverage goes out, or goes in and out? Do they just refund the ticket price? A lot of things could go wrong, and I don't really trust the NFL to not screw it up.

I liked the idea at first, but the more I think about it, the more I don't think it'd be viable, unless they foresee this covid nonsense to last for 2 or more seasons, with a large impact on ticket sales, then maybe it'd be worth it, or if they could find a way to offer a virtual seat without taking up any existing seats. Still, it's an interesting idea to think about. I could see, perhaps, 20+ years down the road, when VR is more widely affordable, in-use, and stable, this becoming a more common/viable thing for all sorts of entertainment.

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6 hours ago, AFJF said:

If you're the league and trying to play games and keep things as genuine as possible, do you consider pumping crowd noise in to stadiums to create some of the elements teams would actually face on game day?

I can't imagine a game in complete silence and offense/defense being able to perfectly hear everything opposing players/coaches are saying.

I read an article in which Brandon Graham, DL for the Eagles, said games without fans or a fraction of fans would be more like scrimmages.  And that in scrimmages there are some fans, however most of the noise comes from trash talking, both from players on the field and from the sidelines from both players and coaches. I know they have talked about using artificial crowd noise, but it might be pretty cool to have a game where you can hear most of the trash talking.  It would probably have to be on a cable station and not network because of the language. But it would be cool to have a version of the game televised where you actually hear the players talk smack.

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36 minutes ago, JETSfaninNE said:

If someone doesn't introduce "virtual tickets" as a means to add revenue with Virtual Reality its a major missed opportunity in my opinion.  VR has been experimenting with live sports and entertainment for a couple years now (especially with basketball/baseball and with the accessibility of higher quality headsets like the Oculus Quest and Valve Index for PC and better cameras/resolutions for 360 degree capture.  It just makes sense to pilot virtual tickets where you pick a seat in the stadium and watch the game as if you were actually there.  They could charge different prices on the quality of the seat as well as sell the same seats to different people as no one is physically occupying the space.  Add in actual social communications between avatars in different "instances" of the game and you have actual proximity stadium noise in VR.  

just a little VR rant I've been thinking about recently lol

p8gn69onlockcpkeeck1.gif

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6 hours ago, nycdan said:

Giant Zoom sessions. Put the fans up in small squares on the jumbotrons.  Pipe in the noise.

Why limit it to crowd noise? Pump in laugh tracks for busted plays, dropped passes and great juke moves.  Farts and vomiting sounds should not be ruled out.

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1 hour ago, #27TheDominator said:

Will they all have their computer generated images photoshopped into the Meadowlands parking lot? 

You seem very proud about paying more for the same thing.

If we’re paying $5,000 for season tickets we’re not allowed to use then we better be CGI’d onto faux telecast crowd shots.  That’s all I’m saying.  

SAR I

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1 hour ago, Spoot-Face said:

Not a bad idea in theory. It could be a good compromise between people going to the game and staying at home safely to watch on T.V., and would offer an increase in revenue for the NFL if fan attendance is limited, although there are a few wrinkles I see.

1. How widespread is VR use really? Do enough people have these for it to be worth the NFL to invest time/money into using this technology? VR is quite expensive, as far as I've seen. At least, any that's reliable and of good quality. Not to mention, the sickness it can give some people.

2. Also, I gotta believe this would be only temporary until the stadiums are back at full-capacity. Why charge a lesser price for a seat for "virtual ticket" when you can charge full price to have a real butt sit in that seat and spend money at the concessions? Or, if they charge the same price, would enough fans opt to pay for a virtual seat when they could pay the same price to actually be there? I'm sure a few would, but only a small percentage, and even, then, the stadium is loosing out on those concession sales. The only way I'd see it working is if they charged more money for the VR experience, while factoring in average concession sales per person into the ticket. Even then, I don't see many takers, so I question the long-term financial viability for such an investment on the NFL's part.

3. Thinking about the actual implementation: they'd have to construct some sort of network to support this in a very short time (one that would, likely, as I mentioned above, only be temporary). Do-able, but probably costly, and not without a lot of bugs. What happens if the coverage goes out, or goes in and out? Do they just refund the ticket price? A lot of things could go wrong, and I don't really trust the NFL to not screw it up.

I liked the idea at first, but the more I think about it, the more I don't think it'd be viable, unless they foresee this covid nonsense to last for 2 or more seasons, with a large impact on ticket sales, then maybe it'd be worth it, or if they could find a way to offer a virtual seat without taking up any existing seats. Still, it's an interesting idea to think about. I could see, perhaps, 20+ years down the road, when VR is more widely affordable, in-use, and stable, this becoming a more common/viable thing for all sorts of entertainment.

Thanks for the well thought out criticism of the idea.  I love VR technology so I'm an advocate of it and a little biased towards pushing adoption.  To provide a few more details

1. US population is probably around 15-25% capable. (maybe around 50 million)  Most of this content would be a seated experience which helps big time with the motion sickness.  Technology has gotten so smooth with VR that motion sickness is now present in a very small minority of people.  The latest tech for VR is 299.99, the Oculus Quest (requires no PC, phone or added hardware accessories, just put the headset on and off you go)

2.  If they were to do this now, I would expect no price for admission and limited views around the stadium, like 1 end zone seat on each side and maybe 50 yd line or field level 50 yd line on each side.  As a VR advocate I'd like to see NFL do this just to help drive adoption rate of VR through the roof.  This pandemic has already caused Oculus Quests to be severely limited as many people stuck at home look for some type of escape.

3. Check out what the NBA has done with VR/AR technology: https://www.nba.com/xr and here is bit more background on the inner workings and the added benefit of producing VR content that goes behind the scenes .  The producers of the NBA content do admit themselves that just trying to mimic a courtside seat is still difficult with todays tech. 

Quote

Originally, Marsilio thought that replicating a fan's courtside experience was where NBA VR was headed. Turns out that putting a camera down at a courtside seat wasn't going to cut it.

“In order to really feel courtside, you need technology that doesn’t exist today," Marsilio said. "What we found was incorporating things we’ve learned from other media, like television, and taking what’s great about immersive media and combining them, gives you the best possible experience in immersive media today."

For a VR broadcast, it's positioning eight cameras around the court and moving between them like a regular TV broadcast.

"And you have dedicated commentators," like Ready and Hamilton, Marsilio said, "who know where the VR camera is."

I'm hoping they at least put out a pilot test for a few games and if nothing else hope I've piqued some JetNation posters about the potential of VR!

Edited by JETSfaninNE
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12 minutes ago, JETSfaninNE said:

Thanks for the well thought out criticism of the idea.  I love VR technology so I'm an advocate of it and a little biased towards pushing adoption.  To provide a few more details

1. US population is probably around 15-25% capable. (maybe around 50 million)  Most of this content would be a seated experience which helps big time with the motion sickness.  Technology has gotten so smooth with VR that motion sickness is now present in a very small minority of people.  The latest tech for VR is 299.99, the Oculus Quest (requires no PC, phone or added hardware accessories, just put the headset on and off you go)

2.  If they were to do this now, I would expect no price for admission and limited views around the stadium, like 1 end zone seat on each side and maybe 50 yd line or field level 50 yd line on each side.  As a VR advocate I'd like to see NFL do this just to help drive adoption rate of VR through the roof.  This pandemic has already caused Oculus Quests to be severely limited as many people stuck at home look for some type of escape.

3. Check out what the NBA has done with VR/AR technology: https://www.nba.com/xr and here is bit more background on the inner workings and the added benefit of producing VR content that goes behind the scenes .  The producers of the NBA content do admit themselves that just trying to mimic a courtside seat is still difficult with todays tech. 

I'm hoping they at least put out a pilot test for a few games and if nothing else hope I've piqued some JetNation posters about the potential of VR!

Wow, I had no idea the NBA was even experimenting with VR. Perhaps the NFL is closer to being able to implement it themselves than I'm giving them credit for. I'm totally all for them testing this out in a limited capacity, even with just a few seat views, as you suggest, just to dip their toes in it. After all, I do believe we'll get there eventually.

And the idea to be able to move between cameras all around the arena, rather than being confined to a seat is really intriguing. That would solve my argument of taking away revenue by subtracting actual butts in seats. As long as the network was strong enough, they could have as many additional VR "attendees" as they wanted floating around between multiple camera views. Imagine a view right along the goal line as the play is coming your way!

Thanks for sharing the info, man. I'd love to be wrong and see this sort of thing implemented sooner than later. You're right to bring this up, because this just might be the time to start experimenting, and with the NBA already doing so, it's not as far-fetched as I initially thought.

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9 hours ago, nycdan said:

Giant Zoom sessions. Put the fans up in small squares on the jumbotrons.  Pipe in the noise.

 This exactly! Straight from everybody's living room cheering on the team... ain't nothing wrong with that at all! I've actually been contemplating this for a few weeks.

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How do they fake crowd reactions to big hits, missed catches, turnovers, TDs, etc.? Do they put the game on a delay? Or would the crowd sounds just not match the action on the field? Either way, I think it's dumb.
I also prefer my sitcoms without a laugh track. Perhaps an apt metaphor for a Jet fan. 


I think the emphasis of big plays would need to come from the commentators who would probably be prepped to come across as more enthusiastic!

There is only one man for the job that can pull in the ratings for great commentary....GET HIM SIGNED!giphy.gif?cid=349c9dd7177b8dcc6b8b49e7630f0d48ac4c40304db13cb5&rid=giphy.gif
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9 hours ago, RutgersJetFan said:

It's how UFC events have been going down and it's actually pretty cool. Hearing what all the coaches are yelling out and hearing every single little step, I dunno, it's a new way of enjoying sports and I have to say I have been a fan.

I thought about that and I think it would definitely be cool for us to be able to hear a lot of what they're saying, but I can't see coaches being alright with it.  

 

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13 hours ago, slats said:

From PFT: 

FOX tries out fake crowd noise for Bundesliga soccer

Posted by Mike Florio on May 26, 2020, 1:01 PM EDT

FOX has taken a big step closer to using fake crowd noise for fan-free football.

Currently airing on FS1 is a Bundesliga soccer match between Borussia Dortmund and Bayern Munich. The stadium is empty, but the broadcast include traditional soccer sounds, from the persistent dull rumble to scattered chants.

The game is scoreless, so there’s not yet been a chance to hear how FOX will handle the reaction to a goal.

It all sounds natural, until the camera angle inevitably shows the thousands of empty seats in the venue.

FOX and other networks reportedly are considering fake crowd noise for NFL broadcasts this season, if games don’t include fans in the stands. 

_______________________________________________

I think fake noise would be more distracting than not. I think they'd be wiser to take advantage of the lack of crowds and listen in on what players and coaches are saying. A lot of fans might find themselves gaining some more insight into the game. 

But the bold above is what I'd really question. How do they fake crowd reactions to big hits, missed catches, turnovers, TDs, etc.? Do they put the game on a delay? Or would the crowd sounds just not match the action on the field? Either way, I think it's dumb.

I also prefer my sitcoms without a laugh track. Perhaps an apt metaphor for a Jet fan. 

Japanese overdubs like iron chef 

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16 hours ago, SAR I said:

In the stadium, no, there shouldn't be any faked crowd noise.  This could lead to a stadium sound guy influencing the outcome, can't have that.

On TV however, we need a) crowd noise, b) on field reporters, and c) CGI crowd effects.  It's not hard to make a game look like it's being played in a full stadium, so the networks should do just that.

SAR I

100 percent agree. It will be interesting to see how it impacts the sport. It certainly will be easier to execute on offense for the road team in tough environments like Buffalo, KC, Seattle, etc. 

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