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GreekJet

Sam Darnold looking good in camp

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Yeah.
Doesn't make much sense though.
No one ever said if Allen threw 10 more times, he would reach Darnold's %.
I said the difference in completion percentage, is 10 completions.
Which it is.
And apparently that makes me a Bills fan (just don't tell my father-in-law).
Actually you math is wrong Greencow. Taking a look at 2019, Darnold's completion percentage was more than 3.1٪ higher than Allen's. Even using Allens less than average 461 throws (and multiply by. 031) that works out to almost 14.5 extra completions over a season - not 10. Using an average QB that throws 34 times a game as a baseline, that would work out to almost 17 extra completions a year.

If you look at both seasons, Darnold's completion percentage is over 3.5% better than Allen's. That works out to be over 16 more completions a year assuming 461 throws. Using a normal amount of throws per game, that would work out to over 19 extra completions. Sorry to break the news to you.

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Greencow, sorry but your not being intellectually honest. Darnolds completion percentage was over 61.9% not 61% . That extra .9% over 461 passes works out to over four extra completions. Using any calculator that has all the buttons: 285 (ie. 14 extra completions than Allen actually had) / 461 = 61.822%. That is less than Darnold's real completion percentage of over 61.9%.

 

Therefore, Allen would have to complete more than 14 extra completions over the last season than he actually had match Darnold's completion percentage.

 

The same result would also be seen if you used an abacus or a slide rule. No offense, but maybe you should pick up your mic or enroll in Mathnasium.

 

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Lol. You’re breaking it down into the tenths of a percent. 

Ok. If you want the extra 0.9%, then you can have it.
I think most people would find it trivial, but sure - throw in the extra 4 passes. It doesn’t really change the point.
If we want to label Allen as trash, then we must also accept that Sam is not far behind, as the difference is only 14 completions.
Less than 1 per game.


You were the one that was so adamant on the 10 completion (first 10 checkdowns) difference between Allan and Darnold per year. You must have mentioned it over 10 times in this thread and derided anyone you didn't agree with you.

A more accurate number over their two year careers is more than 19 extra completions adjusted for a full 16 game season. In the grand scheme of things, .9% might not be significant, but a 3.5% completion peecentage difference (over their careers) is not insignificant.

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9 hours ago, GreenCow said:

I understand. You’re breaking it down into the tenths of a percent, whereas I simply went to the whole number.

If you want the extra 0.9%, then you can have it.

I think most people would find it trivial but you can throw in the extra 4 passes. It doesn’t really change the point.

Here’s the point:

If we want to label Allen as trash, then we must also accept that Sam is not far behind, as the difference is only 14 completions.

Less than 1 per game.

Sam is less than 1 completion per game away from a “trash” inaccurate QB.

I’m not sure why you would attempt to use career stats when the rookie season is a clear outlier. Imagine projecting Peyton Manning’s career INT’s based on his awful rookie season. He would have shattered records.

If you still don’t understand what I’m saying, that’s ok. We can agree to disagree.

 

 

If I believed that you were being honest and inadvertently forgot the ".9" I wouldn't have called you out.  However, it's pretty easy to look at any stat lines for Darnold and Allen and subtract 61.9% - 58.8% and see the difference is 3.1% (at least you would see it's more than 3%).  We are not talking calculus here.  When trying to compare two QB's I don't think that many people would start picking numbers to add to completions then divide by attempts (like you did) to see how many extra completions it would take to get to a certain percentage.  You could do it of course, but it would be trial and error and take you longer.  (Sorry to get all "mathy" here).

I have added their rookie years because as far a I know they count in the career stats assessment.  Every site I look at to compare stats they show both seasons.  It's not like 2018 didn't happen.  Why do you discount 2018?  Do you know that the 2018 is an outlier?  I am happy to count both the 2019 season and their career stats - which is how I responded.  

PS: I understand totally what you're saying.

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