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Jets Interviewed Eric Bieniemy Today


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Way down on my list...

You guys aren’t happy with anything. It’s the first interview..relax.

I would say that typing "the black guy" is poorer optics.

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19 minutes ago, Embrace the Suck said:

Why is that?

Because that’s why they interviewed him. He’s not my 1st choice but he’s on the list. Unlike Gase, players love him, play hard for him & have said he’s not a pushover & Andy lets him get in these guys faces. 
Jokes is guys try to avoid him when they screw up. I think Andy puts more on his plate than what you see or think you see. 

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2 hours ago, InstantClassic said:

you know this guys is way better than bowles and gase. So Im not sure how anyone even if down on  your wish list would be mad at the hire. I for 1 would love him or any decent coach prespect. Coming from Andy and his school of coaching, is not a bad thing.

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8 minutes ago, Jetster said:

Because that’s why they interviewed him. He’s not my 1st choice but he’s on the list. Unlike Gase, players love him, play hard for him & have said he’s not a pushover & Andy lets him get in these guys faces. 
Jokes is guys try to avoid him when they screw up. I think Andy puts more on his plate than what you see or think you see. 

Meh, it's easy when you're winning every game and coasting to another super bowl. 

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I would really be interested what these interviews are like.  I would like someone former GM or such to write up what they are like.  Perhaps I should just google it so I do not get reprimanded for not googling it?



Please let us know what you find out


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8 minutes ago, doitny said:

looking at all this talk on Bieniemy  i think its more than fair to question how much of KCs great offense is on him.

Andy Reid is one of the greatest coaches of all time.

1. Andy Reid is an offensive guy. its fair to say he has a big input on the plays and QB development. he was a QB coach for 2 years in GB. no he didnt develop Farve but maybe he learned something cause....

2. Andy Reid has never had a bad QB.

Donovan McNabb 1999-2009

Michael Vick- 2010-2012 .... he wasn't drafted but Reid got 2 decent years from him.

Alex Smith 2013-2017..... its fair to say he didnt have too good of teams in SF, but he came to a 2-14 KC team and won 11 games and goes to a pro bowl.  btw Bieniemy was RB coach during this time.

Pat Mahomes 2018- 

is this a coincidence ? or does Andy Reid know QBs.

and if you look at Andy Reids coaching tree it is quite impressive. except none are OCs

John Harbaugh- ST

Doug Pederson- QB coach

Ron Rivera - LB coach

Sean McDermott- DC

Matt Nagy  - Offensive quality control

now there are 2 OCs..

Brad Childress- 39-35

and who can forget the legendary

Pat Shurmur - 9-23 with Browns, 9-23 with Giants..

even Todd Bowles spent a year with Reid.

and Andy Reid calls ALL the plays. 

funny as i write this im listening to the Michael Kay show and Michael and Don are saying the same thing. there not so sure on Bieniemy.

Buyer beware

 

 

 

This is ******* brilliant. Post more often. 

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2 hours ago, Bleedin Green said:

I'm unsure about Bieniemy, but I find it pretty hysterical the unforgiving indictment of him that comes with the questions about how much share of the credit he deserves for 3 years of a dominant offense, while no such questions exist for everyone's newest favorite one-hit-wonder Daboll, who had an awful resume prior to this season, but is somehow given sole credit for Josh Allen dramatically improving during the very same offseason where they weren't even allowed to see each other, and Allen instead hired himself a private QB coach (Palmer).

This arguement is so absurd, its funny. But let me knock it Down. 

 

First off, Even Tom Brady and Peyton Manning had off season throwing coaches,  you know that,  right?

 

Daboll has coached both sides of the ball. EB was a running back coach.

 

Daboll has designed offenses and called games  EB had done neither. 

 

Prior to Mahomes, EB hasn't even been tasked with handling a QB, and all of the credit with Mahomes goes to Reid. Hell, the last 2 years, Mahomes is coached by Kafka, not Bienemy.  

 

Eric Bieniemy has interviewed multiple times, for multiple teams over tye last several years, and during that span, Anthony Lynn, Todd Bowles and Brian Flores were all hired as HCs, so let's nip that one in the bud. 

 

Until Eric shows he can even do the basic requirements without being under Uncle Andy, and with the most talented QB possibly ever, let's take a step back. 

 

Notice I didn't even have to get into EBs....checkered past or the possibility that he either comes off as stupid or crazy in interviews.....

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5 minutes ago, ljr said:

 

 


Please let us know what you find out


Sent from my iPhone using JetNation.com mobile app

 

 

This was posted before, and a pretty good read.  Prety much what you'd expect I think

 

 

What’s Going On In That Coaching Interview? Inside the Firing-and-Hiring Process

You’d better come prepared—with a full list of your proposed staff, and detailed ideas about the roster and how you’d use it—when you enter the interview room looking for an NFL head coaching job. Here’s an outline of the firing-and-hiring process.
ANDREW BRANDT
UPDATED:
JAN 14, 2020
ORIGINAL:
JAN 8, 2019
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

The end of the NFL regular season brings a flurry of activity in the business of football. The player sections of the team facilities “go dark” after the season, only to fully re-open in April when the offseason workout programs begin. Teams are now signing players to “future” contracts, a term used for contracts set to begin in the 2019 league year, which does not begin until March.

More notable has been the exit ramp for NFL head coaches, with eight of the 32 head coaches this season being told the team was “moving in a different direction.” Coaches are the immediate casualties of team lack of success, told to move forward in their lives away from their now-former teams. And in a couple of months, scores of players will face the same fate from their teams.

Let’s look at this harsh time of year in the business of football.

Stark Finality

Twenty of the 32 NFL teams ventured into the offseason before the calendar hit 2019, and four more—the Bears, Ravens, Seahawks and Texans—exited on Monday. Players pack up their lockers, load up cardboard boxes and trash bags and disperse to their offseason locations. I vividly remember feelings of loneliness every year on that day; the locker room—so vibrant for six the past months—turns instantly into a space you could drive a car through without hitting anyone. And the CBA now mandates that players stay away from the facility until mid-April, a compulsory three-month vacation with no contact with anyone in football operations.

I always felt like a counselor at summer camp saying goodbye to the campers and heading back into a lonely bunk. In Green Bay, players would all go to warmer climes as I would inevitably get this question every year from a player walking out: “Andrew, do you have to stay here in the offseason?” I replied that I did; it was, after all, my job. But it always took a week or two to get used to being in such a quiet facility after the season.

In-depth analysis, unrivaled access. Get SPORTS ILLUSTRATED's best stories every weekday. Sign up now.

 

VRENTAS: In the Room at a Coaching Interview

From a management perspective, everything is future focused once the regular season is over, even for teams in the playoffs. Scouting staffs soon gather in war rooms to assemble and architect “the Board” before heading to the combine in late February. General managers and cap analysts project roster deletions and free-agency additions. And here is the cold reality on the player side: There are probably 10 to 20 players per team leaving those locker rooms who will never to return to them again. They may not know it now, but they will get that phone call at some point before the team gathers again in April.

A Coach’s Life

One in four of this season’s head coaches were “relieved of their duties” during or after the NFL season, and the trend does not seem more forgiving. Two years ago, seven new head coaches were hired; only the Eagles’ Doug Pederson still has his job. That is as stark a statistic as there is. The lack of patience with coaching performance—the Cardinals fired coach Steve Wilks after one season—seems at an all-time high. My sense is that there are two compelling factors behind this owner impatience.

First, with NFL franchise values all at or exceeding $2 billion, owners can justify jettisoning a coaching staff that will cost them, say, $15 million to 20 million in leftover contract expenses. With the head coach being the face of the franchise, owners will spend, and spend some more, to get it right. There is no better example of this than Browns owner Jimmy Haslam, who goes through coaching staffs like a hot knife through butter. The Browns are the clear league leader in payroll for fired coaches and executives.

 
 

The other reason for the quick trigger by NFL owners is, to my view, a sense of envy and competitiveness. Owners see teams improve quickly with systematic restraints on player costs—salary cap, free-agency restrictions, revenue sharing, inverse order draft, etc.—and wonder, Why not us? Owners also see quick turnarounds with teams such as the Rams and Bears and want the “next” Sean McVay or Matt Nagy, damn the consequences of firing the coach.

EXCERPT: Doug Pederson on His Eagles Coaching Interview

Beyond the head coach, there are many ripples to a firing. Coaching staffs are in holding patterns, coming into work every day hoping “the new guy” will want them to stay on, even knowing the chances of that are very small. Families are also on hold, not sure where the children will be going to school or whether to put homes on the market at the worst possible time of the year. I know what a lot of you are thinking: “But these coaches get paid a lot of money and know the life they signed up for.” That is true, but it doesn’t mean it is an uncertain and unsettled time for so many of them.

Compared to players, however, coaching contracts are quite secure. They are guaranteed subject to offset, meaning the owed amounts are potentially reduced by coaching income from other teams. Having said that, my experience is that coaches want to coach; they are not prone to sit around and collect checks. It is the life they have chosen.

 
ADVERTISING
 

The Interview Process

I was part of a two different interview processes in selecting a head coach for the Packers. In 2006, our finalists were Mike McCarthy and Sean Payton. McCarthy won the tiebreaker due to more familiarity with our staff and having served as quarterbacks coach of the Packers for one year, in 1999.

While different for every team, there are a couple of constants. Team personnel is a major discussion point, as coaching candidates are asked (1) thoughts on certain players and their fit with his scheme; (2) commitment to certain players (to see if that lines up with the front office’s commitment); and (3) willingness to play young players, reliance on veterans, etc.

Structure is obviously a discussion point in interviews, often depending on the leverage of the candidate. For someone in high demand, a team might be more deferential in terms of structure and control over the roster. For a first-time head coach, there is little to no leverage on his part to have any control with roster construction; that is the general manager and player personnel role.

DICKEY: The Eight Coaching Types Your Team Is Interviewing

Another important discussion point is staffing. Every coach comes (or should come) prepared with a full staff in mind, from coordinators all the way down to conditioning and strength coaches. And the team may state a strong preference or suggestion to keep a certain coach or coaches from the previous staff. When we interviewed Mike Sherman, an unknown tight ends coach from the Seattle Seahawks, for the Packers head coach position in 2001, he had a full coaching staff prepared, with complete biographies and resumes of each coordinator and position coach.

 
ADVERTISING
 

Search Firms and Agents

Over the past decade in the NFL, search firms have become an increasingly large part of the head coach selection process. Jed Hughes, formerly of Spencer Stuart and now of Korn Ferry, has become a go-to resource for NFL owners. Hughes has his “book” of candidates and is retained by teams to do background checks as well as interview, research and recommend candidates.

The value of search firms in this process can be debated but, well, I just don’t see it. NFL owners are paying these firms handsomely, with fees ranging as high as 33% of the coach’s first-year salary, to essentially identify candidates who can be identified relatively easily, and to ask questions that they themselves can—and do—figure out to ask. My best guess as to why owners continue to use this expensive tool that has shown mixed results is that owners want to “check the box.” They can answer to themselves, their fans and their owner brethren that they have taken that extra step in ensuring they have the right person. And, of course, if things don’t work out, they have cover to just blame it on the search firm!

BRANDT: No Way the Steelers Are Trading or Cutting Antonio Brown

Agents for coaches are another other group heavily involved in the coaching selection process. This is the time of year where coaches’ agents change their names to “league sources,” as they work their media contacts to get their clients’ names out in the mix of “hot” candidates. I often receive solicitations from coaches’ agents to “get his name out there” or to tweet that he is “receiving interest”’—the point being, to spark further interest. I won’t play that game. This is time of year when coaches’ agents—just like player agents in February and March—work it hard.

 
ADVERTISING

The most important games of the year are happening on the field, but the business of the NFL is in high gear off the field, and will be that way now for a while.

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1 hour ago, joewilly12 said:

here's your promotional NY Jets official rewards members bag. 

Enclosed is an autograph Le'Veon Bell mini helmet, Jamal Adams jersey and an 8x10 Sam Darnold picture and did I mention the Adam Gase coffee mug and NY Jets lanyard and from the NY Jets advisory committee a fake Rolex. 

stand up lol GIF by Hollywood Suite

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I don’t give a sh*t if he can call the good plays or not. Can he manage every facet of the team, manage a game, get the most out of his players, and willing to push back against some of the BS you have to deal with with the Johnsons? He seems like a fairly strong candidate to me.

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1 hour ago, Jetster said:

Because that’s why they interviewed him. He’s not my 1st choice but he’s on the list. Unlike Gase, players love him, play hard for him & have said he’s not a pushover & Andy lets him get in these guys faces. 
Jokes is guys try to avoid him when they screw up. I think Andy puts more on his plate than what you see or think you see. 

Discipline and an ability to earn a player's respect is good for any player in my opinion. You mentioned Fields specifically.

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29 minutes ago, Jet_Engine1 said:

First off, Even Tom Brady and Peyton Manning had off season throwing coaches,  you know that,  right?

Which of those 2 were disastrous failures who only turned it around after that, with credit then being given solely to an OC they didn't even see during that period?  Your point has literally no relevancy at all.

29 minutes ago, Jet_Engine1 said:

Daboll has coached both sides of the ball. EB was a running back coach.

Daboll was a defensive assistant 20 years ago.  EB has also worked as an AHC and OC (granted, the latter in college, but still worth pointing out considering the false narrative you're going for here and with the following).

29 minutes ago, Jet_Engine1 said:

Daboll has designed offenses and called games  EB had done neither. 

Daboll was a disastrous failure at it prior to this season.  Bieniemy has done it in the past, and claims of otherwise currently are conjecture that both Bieniemy and Reid have refuted on multiple occasions.

29 minutes ago, Jet_Engine1 said:

Prior to Mahomes, EB hasn't even been tasked with handling a QB, and all of the credit with Mahomes goes to Reid. Hell, the last 2 years, Mahomes is coached by Kafka, not Bienemy.  

By that same logic, Daboll would deserve absolutely no credit for Josh Allen, which is the one positive he has on his resume over the course of 2+ decades.  But of course, it's already clear you're deliberately applying different rules for everything, strictly to fulfill your confirmation bias.

29 minutes ago, Jet_Engine1 said:

Eric Bieniemy has interviewed multiple times, for multiple teams over tye last several years, and during that span, Anthony Lynn, Todd Bowles and Brian Flores were all hired as HCs, so let's nip that one in the bud. 

What's your point?  In that time, Daboll wasn't even considered worhty of a single interview, despite the longer coaching resume.   Therefore, he was considered a worse candidate by the entire league than not only all of them, but Bieniemy as well.

29 minutes ago, Jet_Engine1 said:

Until Eric shows he can even do the basic requirements without being under Uncle Andy, and with the most talented QB possibly ever, let's take a step back. 

Actually, I clearly said I'm not 100% sold on him, but simply pointing out the contradictory logic that none of the rules are getting applied to the another guy with a worse track record, strictly because of some who are blinded by falling for the most recent one-season-wonder of a coordinator, which we all know has such a great rate of success.

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2 hours ago, Charlie Brown said:

@TNJetLove Fitzgerald, just don't think the "Living Legend" in Pat Fitzgerald would leave NorthWestern Football for the Jets!

But we would be SUPER DUPER LUCKY to ever get him!!!

Money talks brother, and all coaches want to win at the highest level.

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3 hours ago, SAR I said:

Confused.  Wasn't Steve Cohen supposed to buy you an All Star team by now?

Listen, if you're a Jets fan and don't understand after 25 years that our next head coach is going to be worse than the one who preceded him, you need to go grab a bottle of Jack and keep sipping it for the next month.

SAR I

No ones worse than Gase. You can’t get any worse than the sh*t we’ve just been served. Can’t wait for your 2-14 prediction thread for 2021, when we go 8-8 😁

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1 hour ago, flgreen said:

This was posted before, and a pretty good read.  Prety much what you'd expect I think

 

 

What’s Going On In That Coaching Interview? Inside the Firing-and-Hiring Process

You’d better come prepared—with a full list of your proposed staff, and detailed ideas about the roster and how you’d use it—when you enter the interview room looking for an NFL head coaching job. Here’s an outline of the firing-and-hiring process.
ANDREW BRANDT
UPDATED:
JAN 14, 2020
ORIGINAL:
JAN 8, 2019
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

The end of the NFL regular season brings a flurry of activity in the business of football. The player sections of the team facilities “go dark” after the season, only to fully re-open in April when the offseason workout programs begin. Teams are now signing players to “future” contracts, a term used for contracts set to begin in the 2019 league year, which does not begin until March.

More notable has been the exit ramp for NFL head coaches, with eight of the 32 head coaches this season being told the team was “moving in a different direction.” Coaches are the immediate casualties of team lack of success, told to move forward in their lives away from their now-former teams. And in a couple of months, scores of players will face the same fate from their teams.

Let’s look at this harsh time of year in the business of football.

Stark Finality

Twenty of the 32 NFL teams ventured into the offseason before the calendar hit 2019, and four more—the Bears, Ravens, Seahawks and Texans—exited on Monday. Players pack up their lockers, load up cardboard boxes and trash bags and disperse to their offseason locations. I vividly remember feelings of loneliness every year on that day; the locker room—so vibrant for six the past months—turns instantly into a space you could drive a car through without hitting anyone. And the CBA now mandates that players stay away from the facility until mid-April, a compulsory three-month vacation with no contact with anyone in football operations.

I always felt like a counselor at summer camp saying goodbye to the campers and heading back into a lonely bunk. In Green Bay, players would all go to warmer climes as I would inevitably get this question every year from a player walking out: “Andrew, do you have to stay here in the offseason?” I replied that I did; it was, after all, my job. But it always took a week or two to get used to being in such a quiet facility after the season.

In-depth analysis, unrivaled access. Get SPORTS ILLUSTRATED's best stories every weekday. Sign up now.

 

VRENTAS: In the Room at a Coaching Interview

From a management perspective, everything is future focused once the regular season is over, even for teams in the playoffs. Scouting staffs soon gather in war rooms to assemble and architect “the Board” before heading to the combine in late February. General managers and cap analysts project roster deletions and free-agency additions. And here is the cold reality on the player side: There are probably 10 to 20 players per team leaving those locker rooms who will never to return to them again. They may not know it now, but they will get that phone call at some point before the team gathers again in April.

A Coach’s Life

One in four of this season’s head coaches were “relieved of their duties” during or after the NFL season, and the trend does not seem more forgiving. Two years ago, seven new head coaches were hired; only the Eagles’ Doug Pederson still has his job. That is as stark a statistic as there is. The lack of patience with coaching performance—the Cardinals fired coach Steve Wilks after one season—seems at an all-time high. My sense is that there are two compelling factors behind this owner impatience.

First, with NFL franchise values all at or exceeding $2 billion, owners can justify jettisoning a coaching staff that will cost them, say, $15 million to 20 million in leftover contract expenses. With the head coach being the face of the franchise, owners will spend, and spend some more, to get it right. There is no better example of this than Browns owner Jimmy Haslam, who goes through coaching staffs like a hot knife through butter. The Browns are the clear league leader in payroll for fired coaches and executives.

 
 

The other reason for the quick trigger by NFL owners is, to my view, a sense of envy and competitiveness. Owners see teams improve quickly with systematic restraints on player costs—salary cap, free-agency restrictions, revenue sharing, inverse order draft, etc.—and wonder, Why not us? Owners also see quick turnarounds with teams such as the Rams and Bears and want the “next” Sean McVay or Matt Nagy, damn the consequences of firing the coach.

EXCERPT: Doug Pederson on His Eagles Coaching Interview

Beyond the head coach, there are many ripples to a firing. Coaching staffs are in holding patterns, coming into work every day hoping “the new guy” will want them to stay on, even knowing the chances of that are very small. Families are also on hold, not sure where the children will be going to school or whether to put homes on the market at the worst possible time of the year. I know what a lot of you are thinking: “But these coaches get paid a lot of money and know the life they signed up for.” That is true, but it doesn’t mean it is an uncertain and unsettled time for so many of them.

Compared to players, however, coaching contracts are quite secure. They are guaranteed subject to offset, meaning the owed amounts are potentially reduced by coaching income from other teams. Having said that, my experience is that coaches want to coach; they are not prone to sit around and collect checks. It is the life they have chosen.

 
ADVERTISING
 

The Interview Process

I was part of a two different interview processes in selecting a head coach for the Packers. In 2006, our finalists were Mike McCarthy and Sean Payton. McCarthy won the tiebreaker due to more familiarity with our staff and having served as quarterbacks coach of the Packers for one year, in 1999.

While different for every team, there are a couple of constants. Team personnel is a major discussion point, as coaching candidates are asked (1) thoughts on certain players and their fit with his scheme; (2) commitment to certain players (to see if that lines up with the front office’s commitment); and (3) willingness to play young players, reliance on veterans, etc.

Structure is obviously a discussion point in interviews, often depending on the leverage of the candidate. For someone in high demand, a team might be more deferential in terms of structure and control over the roster. For a first-time head coach, there is little to no leverage on his part to have any control with roster construction; that is the general manager and player personnel role.

DICKEY: The Eight Coaching Types Your Team Is Interviewing

Another important discussion point is staffing. Every coach comes (or should come) prepared with a full staff in mind, from coordinators all the way down to conditioning and strength coaches. And the team may state a strong preference or suggestion to keep a certain coach or coaches from the previous staff. When we interviewed Mike Sherman, an unknown tight ends coach from the Seattle Seahawks, for the Packers head coach position in 2001, he had a full coaching staff prepared, with complete biographies and resumes of each coordinator and position coach.

 
ADVERTISING
 

Search Firms and Agents

Over the past decade in the NFL, search firms have become an increasingly large part of the head coach selection process. Jed Hughes, formerly of Spencer Stuart and now of Korn Ferry, has become a go-to resource for NFL owners. Hughes has his “book” of candidates and is retained by teams to do background checks as well as interview, research and recommend candidates.

The value of search firms in this process can be debated but, well, I just don’t see it. NFL owners are paying these firms handsomely, with fees ranging as high as 33% of the coach’s first-year salary, to essentially identify candidates who can be identified relatively easily, and to ask questions that they themselves can—and do—figure out to ask. My best guess as to why owners continue to use this expensive tool that has shown mixed results is that owners want to “check the box.” They can answer to themselves, their fans and their owner brethren that they have taken that extra step in ensuring they have the right person. And, of course, if things don’t work out, they have cover to just blame it on the search firm!

BRANDT: No Way the Steelers Are Trading or Cutting Antonio Brown

Agents for coaches are another other group heavily involved in the coaching selection process. This is the time of year where coaches’ agents change their names to “league sources,” as they work their media contacts to get their clients’ names out in the mix of “hot” candidates. I often receive solicitations from coaches’ agents to “get his name out there” or to tweet that he is “receiving interest”’—the point being, to spark further interest. I won’t play that game. This is time of year when coaches’ agents—just like player agents in February and March—work it hard.

 
ADVERTISING

The most important games of the year are happening on the field, but the business of the NFL is in high gear off the field, and will be that way now for a while.

great article!!!!!

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4 hours ago, Samtorobby47 said:

What kinda weak ass wide net is this

Haha, agree. 

Although, when they hired Charlie Casserly and Wolfe to help them in their search, the names of people that they ended up interviewing we basically the same 5 guys that every team with an opening interviewed. Nobody copy-cats the way the NFL copy-cats.

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1 hour ago, doitny said:

looking at all this talk on Bieniemy  i think its more than fair to question how much of KCs great offense is on him.

Andy Reid is one of the greatest coaches of all time.

1. Andy Reid is an offensive guy. its fair to say he has a big input on the plays and QB development. he was a QB coach for 2 years in GB. no he didnt develop Farve but maybe he learned something cause....

2. Andy Reid has never had a bad QB.

Donovan McNabb 1999-2009

Michael Vick- 2010-2012 .... he wasn't drafted but Reid got 2 decent years from him.

Alex Smith 2013-2017..... its fair to say he didnt have too good of teams in SF, but he came to a 2-14 KC team and won 11 games and goes to a pro bowl.  btw Bieniemy was RB coach during this time.

Pat Mahomes 2018- 

is this a coincidence ? or does Andy Reid know QBs.

and if you look at Andy Reids coaching tree it is quite impressive. except none are OCs

John Harbaugh- ST

Doug Pederson- QB coach

Ron Rivera - LB coach

Sean McDermott- DC

Matt Nagy  - Offensive quality control

now there are 2 OCs..

Brad Childress- 39-35

and who can forget the legendary

Pat Shurmur - 9-23 with Browns, 9-23 with Giants..

even Todd Bowles spent a year with Reid.

and Andy Reid calls ALL the plays. 

funny as i write this im listening to the Michael Kay show and Michael and Don are saying the same thing. there not so sure on Bieniemy.

Buyer beware

 

 

 

 

Yeah, hate to break it to you, but both Pederson and Nagy were Chiefs OCs.

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1 hour ago, BurnleyJet said:

No ones worse than Gase. You can’t get any worse than the sh*t we’ve just been served. Can’t wait for your 2-14 prediction thread for 2021, when we go 8-8 😁

Oh, there are coaches worse than Gase.  Let's hope we don't get one.

My point has nothing to do with him.  My point is that the Jets are unfortunately positioned to get the worst coaching candidate in this year's pool because of the situation we find ourselves in which is worse than it was in 2019 when Sam Darnold looked like a bonafide franchise quarterback.

There is a reason why no one is excited about the interview process and the list of names we've been made privy to has brought out indifference.  In case you haven't noticed, since Parcells each head coach we've gotten has been worse than the one before.  The reason is because we never do a HC search from a position of strength.  We always blow the timing.

SAR I

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1 hour ago, Integrity28 said:

Haha, agree. 

Although, when they hired Charlie Casserly and Wolfe to help them in their search, the names of people that they ended up interviewing we basically the same 5 guys that every team with an opening interviewed. Nobody copy-cats the way the NFL copy-cats.

Teams copy cat because they fear criticism. The other owners didn’t like the Panthers giving  Rhule all that money. Media panned the Judge hire...

Jets should certainly think outside the box but the fans really don’t want that. 

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1 minute ago, Matt39 said:

Teams copy cat because they fear criticism. The other owners didn’t like the Panthers giving  Rhule all that money. Media panned the Judge hire...

Jets should certainly think outside the box but the fans really don’t want that

I agree in principle, but thinking has not bee the Jets strong suit. 

They really can't afford to mess this hire up, so I personally think they need a proven winner with HC experience. 

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1 minute ago, slimjasi said:

I agree in principle, but thinking has not bee the Jets strong suit. 

They really can't afford to mess this hire up, so I personally think they need a proven winner with HC experience. 

A proven winner with experience is outside the box for the Jets.

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Just now, Matt39 said:

A proven winner with experience is outside the box for the Jets.

I mean, they have tried to get Matt Campbell before and Woody was supposedly wanted Harbaugh before he went to Michigan. 

Either of those guys are no-brainers to me. 

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5 minutes ago, slimjasi said:

I mean, they have tried to get Matt Campbell before and Woody was supposedly wanted Harbaugh before he went to Michigan. 

Either of those guys are no-brainers to me. 

Tried and floated those names out for PR to appease the fans arent the same thing.

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Just now, Matt39 said:

Tried and floated those names out for PR to appease the fans arent the same thing.

I'm not sure which candidate you are referring to - but it's been reported numerous times that Campbell turned them down. 

I don't think that was a PR thing. 

Harbaugh I'm less sure of. 

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5 hours ago, rangerous said:

just like some of the comments about fields playing on a loaded offense, bieniemeny is also the coordinator on a loaded team.  hard to see where he makes a whole lot of difference.

A loaded team that he doesn’t even call the plays for... I really don’t understand the hype he gets. He’s completely unproven like I said in the other Bieniemy thread. 

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