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Tim Bogert Dead at 76


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Tim Bogert, whose playing in Vanilla Fudge influenced a generation of bassists, has died at the age of 76. An official statement has not been released, but Bogert was reportedly battling cancer. The sad news was shared by his longtime bandmate, drummer Carmine Appice, on Facebook.

“He was like a brother to me. He was my friend for over 50 years,” he wrote. “Tim was a one of a kind bass player. He inspired many, many bass players worldwide. He was as masterful at shredding as he was holding down a groove, and Tim introduced a new level of virtuosity into rock bass playing. No one played like Tim. He created bass solos that drove audiences to a frenzy every time he played one. And he played a different solo every night. He was the last of the legendary 60’s bass players.”

Bogert was born in New York City and played multiple instruments growing up. He took up electric bass after becoming interested in surf music. It was in 1965 that he cofounded a band called the Pigeons. After Appice replaced drummer Joey Brennan, they renamed themselves, Vanilla Fudge. The band’s hard-rocking, psychedelic style made them a huge success, especially with their covers of songs like “Ticket to Ride”, “Shotgun”, and – most famously – “You Keep Me Hangin’ On”.

The band was only together for three years before splitting in 1970, although they were able to release five albums in that time. Bogert and Appice teamed together to form Cactus, who also produced four albums. The rhythm section also formed a trio with guitar wizard Jeff Beck for a pair of albums.

Throughout the rest of his years, Bogert worked on many other projects but would reunite with Vanilla Fudge and Cactus several times. He retired from touring in 2010 due to complications from a motorcycle accident.

Billy Sheehan regularly mentions Bogert as one of his main influences. He paid tribute to his hero on Facebook:

“Tim was my hero, biggest influence, and inspiration. The first time I met him was at a NAMM show — he knew nothing about me, but still treated me kindly and we engaged in conversation that led to a lasting friendship. I had a very emotional conversation with him a while ago after he knew he wouldn’t survive very much longer. With grace and dignity, he demonstrated a lack of fear that only a man with a life well lived could. I stood on his shoulders as a player, and I owe him so much in so many ways. I love you, Tim. Thank you for your awesomeness, generosity, and kindness. I hope we meet again, my friend.”

Our thoughts are with the friends and family of Tim Bogert.

https://www.notreble.com/buzz/2021/01/14/in-memoriam-tim-bogert/

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2 hours ago, munchmemory said:

 

 

it has been a long time since I've heard these. Lady, after decades++  oh yeah.  Sure brings back some memories.

If only Rod Stewart joined for a while. That was the plan I read.

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9 hours ago, Dcat said:

wow  new for me.  wow

Found this one a while back by accident.  Listen to the tone on that record.  Just nuts.  Electric blues on steroids.

Glad I could turn on a fellow Cactus/BBA/Tim Bogert fan to the cut. 

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Outside of early Hendrix, Jeff Beck has always been a mile ahead/past everyone.  This BBA cut still sounds fresh today.  That's friggin' 1973.   You can hear elements Eddie VH would incorporate into his playing. What a band.

 

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On 1/16/2021 at 7:03 AM, southparkcpa said:

Not a fan of any bass with more than 4 strings but this Bogertnpiece captures his genius .....

 

 

First let me say I am sad to see him go. BBA was a great band and they were not main stream which made them even cooler but...

I teach bass guitar and even though I like Tim, I would never tell a student to listen to him or what he did. Bass playing has evolved a lot and Tim was still playing stuff guys did in the 80's in this video. It's  fine because it worked for him. Just to give you an example, This is what Victor Wooten was doing over 10 years ago

 

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25 minutes ago, More Cowbell said:

First let me say I am sad to see him go. BBA was a great band and they were not main stream which made them even cooler but...

I teach bass guitar and even though I like Tim, I would never tell a student to listen to him or what he did. Bass playing has evolved a lot and Tim was still playing stuff guys did in the 80's in this video. It's  fine because it worked for him. Just to give you an example, This is what Victor Wooten was doing over 10 years ago

 

Big fan of Wooten. I majored in music, played string bass in college, electric bass, acoustic bass etc.   Don't play anymore but very impressed with what people are doing on the bass these days.  To me, Ray Brown is my idea of a great bass player but there are hundreds of great ones.

Check out Neils Henning.. RIP.

 

 

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15 minutes ago, southparkcpa said:

Big fan of Wooten. I majored in music, played string bass in college, electric bass, acoustic bass etc.   Don't play anymore but very impressed with what people are doing on the bass these days.  To me, Ray Brown is my idea of a great bass player but there are hundreds of great ones.

Check out Neils Henning.. RIP.

 

 

Oh man, I love Niels. I wore out the Chops album of him and Joe Pass. Niels is one of those amazing  players where you can just listen to a song and you know he is the guy playing the bass. Niels was also a pioneer. I think he was the first guy to play an upright  with 3 finger plucking technique.  Ray Brown, Eddie Gomez, and Stanley Clark were also guys I loved to listen to on upright. Stanley  actually started out on upright and picked up the electric later. It's  why he sounds like he is slapping when he is plucking. Marcus Miller said Stanley  was the rudest electric player because he was alway so loud but he could get away with it. 

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18 minutes ago, More Cowbell said:

Oh man, I love Niels. I wore out the Chops album of him and Joe Pass. Niels is one of those amazing  players where you can just listen to a song and you know he is the guy playing the bass. Niels was also a pioneer. I think he was the first guy to play an upright  with 3 finger plucking technique.  Ray Brown, Eddie Gomez, and Stanley Clark were also guys I loved to listen to on upright. Stanley  actually started out on upright and picked up the electric later. It's  why he sounds like he is slapping when he is plucking. Marcus Miller said Stanley  was the rudest electric player because he was alway so loud but he could get away with it. 

WOW!!!   You listened to "Chops"?? My favorite album for years. I demanded to play "Have you met Miss Jones" After I heard Neils play the lead melody.  We were a 2 piece and a 3 piece depending on the gig.  Another album from back in the day was George Shearing at the Carlyle Hotel. Bryan Torff, back then, blew me away. Not as impressed now BUT he is quite accomplished.  Went to NYC and saw Buster Williams 2 years ago.  I went through my Stanley period but really , for me, I had a 10 year hiatus from listening to the electric bass.  Hang around jazz long enough and they convince you it is not a real instrument. :)  

 

 

 

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56 minutes ago, southparkcpa said:

WOW!!!   You listened to "Chops"?? My favorite album for years. I demanded to play "Have you met Miss Jones" After I heard Neils play the lead melody.  We were a 2 piece and a 3 piece depending on the gig.  Another album from back in the day was George Shearing at the Carlyle Hotel. Bryan Torff, back then, blew me away. Not as impressed now BUT he is quite accomplished.  Went to NYC and saw Buster Williams 2 years ago.  I went through my Stanley period but really , for me, I had a 10 year hiatus from listening to the electric bass.  Hang around jazz long enough and they convince you it is not a real instrument. :)  

 

 

 

Check this out. I love you can find these old concerts on You Tube. 

 

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1 hour ago, southparkcpa said:

WOW!!!   You listened to "Chops"?? My favorite album for years. I demanded to play "Have you met Miss Jones" After I heard Neils play the lead melody.  We were a 2 piece and a 3 piece depending on the gig.  Another album from back in the day was George Shearing at the Carlyle Hotel. Bryan Torff, back then, blew me away. Not as impressed now BUT he is quite accomplished.  Went to NYC and saw Buster Williams 2 years ago.  I went through my Stanley period but really , for me, I had a 10 year hiatus from listening to the electric bass.  Hang around jazz long enough and they convince you it is not a real instrument. :)  

 

 

 

I never heard this guy before. Similar style to Niels but Niel's is a lot smoother. 

He doesn't  get a good tone on harmonics like Neils does. 

Yeah,  I have heard that from Jazz players, your not a bass player if you play electric. I think Jaco would have had something to say about that. 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 1/14/2021 at 7:37 PM, munchmemory said:

Tim Bogert, whose playing in Vanilla Fudge influenced a generation of bassists, has died at the age of 76. An official statement has not been released, but Bogert was reportedly battling cancer. The sad news was shared by his longtime bandmate, drummer Carmine Appice, on Facebook.

“He was like a brother to me. He was my friend for over 50 years,” he wrote. “Tim was a one of a kind bass player. He inspired many, many bass players worldwide. He was as masterful at shredding as he was holding down a groove, and Tim introduced a new level of virtuosity into rock bass playing. No one played like Tim. He created bass solos that drove audiences to a frenzy every time he played one. And he played a different solo every night. He was the last of the legendary 60’s bass players.”

Bogert was born in New York City and played multiple instruments growing up. He took up electric bass after becoming interested in surf music. It was in 1965 that he cofounded a band called the Pigeons. After Appice replaced drummer Joey Brennan, they renamed themselves, Vanilla Fudge. The band’s hard-rocking, psychedelic style made them a huge success, especially with their covers of songs like “Ticket to Ride”, “Shotgun”, and – most famously – “You Keep Me Hangin’ On”.

The band was only together for three years before splitting in 1970, although they were able to release five albums in that time. 

This album changed my life. I was 11 and my sister, 10 years older, came home with Vanilla Fudge and Zeppelin 2nd album.  I’ve never been the same since. 

D9B4ED2B-78B5-4E75-964C-D499142D92F6.jpeg

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