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RIP Marty Schottenheimer


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Ex-Giants coach Marty Schottenheimer’s long goodbye almost over after 7-year fight with Alzheimer’s

Updated 2:42 PM; Today 2:16 PM 
Marty Schottenheimer

Former NFL head coach Marty Schottenheimer was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in 2014.ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

Former NFL head coach Marty Schottenheimer is starting to slip away.

His family released a statement Wednesday through ESPN reporter Chris Mortensen:

Diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in 2014, former NFL head coach Marty Schottenheimer was moved to a hospice facility near his home in Charlotte, NC, on Saturday, January 30, where he is listed in stable condition following complications from his disease. The Schottenheimer family asks that you respect their privacy at this time.

“As a family, we are surrounding him with love,” said Pat Schottenheimer, his wife, and speaking on behalf of their children, Kristin and Brian, “and are soaking up the prayers and support from all those he impacted through his incredible life. In the way he taught us all we are putting one foot in front of the other ... one play at a time.”

 

The 77-year-old Schottenheimer, best known for his time as head coach of the Cleveland Browns (1984-88), Kansas City Chiefs (1989-98), Washington Redskins (2001) and San Diego Chargers (2002-06), won 200 games in his 21 seasons in the NFL. He ranks eighth all-time in coaching wins. All of the men ahead of him are in or are destined for the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

1. Don Shula - 328 wins

 

2. George Halas - 318 wins

 

3. Bill Belichick - 280 wins

 

4. Tom Landry - 250 wins

 

5. Curly Lambeau - 226 wins

 

6. Andy Reid - 221 wins

 

7. Paul Brown - 213 wins

 

Schottenheimer’s first job in the NFL came with the New York Giants, as linebackers coach in 1975 and 1976. He was promoted to defensive coordinator in 1977.

 

Before entering the coaching ranks, Schottenheimer spent six seasons in the AFL, playing linebacker for the Buffalo Bills(1965-68) and Boston Patriots (1969-70).

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1 minute ago, Obrien2Toon said:

I think he somehow became the most under rated coach in history 

One of the all time great HCs in NFL history. 60% win rate over a 20 year career. His influence is still felt today in his coaching tree. Sorry to hear about his struggles with Alzheimers and the best to Brian and the rest of his family.

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God bless Marty, a good coach...he is finally free of the clutches of Alzheimers.

Brian Schottenheimer was quoted years ago in an interview as saying that he didn't see that much of his father growing up. Marty was always coaching. Hopefully today with technology the current head coaches are staying more connected with their kids.

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2 hours ago, playtowinthegame said:

 

Notice Bill Cowher was his assistant in the last part of the video. . He was a great coach. A little too conservative at the end of games or he might have got a championship. 

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Jeez cant the author wait for the death before reporting imminent death? Is that where we are now?

Guys been out of the spotlight and sick why not wait x amount of days and report the inevitable then

?

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20 minutes ago, HighPitch said:

Jeez cant the author wait for the death before reporting imminent death? Is that where we are now?

Guys been out of the spotlight and sick why not wait x amount of days and report the inevitable then

?

I could understand reporting on someone going into hospice care to soften the blow for when he does pass away, but it makes no sense to report on a death that didn't happen yet.

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1 hour ago, HighPitch said:

Jeez cant the author wait for the death before reporting imminent death? Is that where we are now?

Guys been out of the spotlight and sick why not wait x amount of days and report the inevitable then

?

 

47 minutes ago, TheNuuFaaolaExperience said:

I could understand reporting on someone going into hospice care to soften the blow for when he does pass away, but it makes no sense to report on a death that didn't happen yet.

It's pathetic. No respect for his family's privacy. Just a time-filling sob story for the media

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4 hours ago, Jets Voice of Reason said:

My wife's grandfather passed away from the disease and it was one of the most traumatic experiences in her life. Luckily, there's a lot of promising research nowadays of treatments that could possibly be disease-altering and a better understanding of underlying factors that may contribute to the cause of the disease. Can't happen soon enough.

How's Dan doing these days?

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14 hours ago, Scott Dierking said:

So sad. Watched my dad succumb to it. There is no easy way around it. 

The best to Marty and his family.

Same here, lost my dad last year to this horrrible disease and feel for any family that is going through it

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Rest in Peace, Marty.

A good man and a good coach. I really liked his Browns and Chiefs teams back in the day.

Always wished he could have found his way to the Jets at some point of his head coaching career.

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