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PFF said that Penei Sewell is the best tackle "EVER"!!! A generational player at the position.


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If he really is that good, then the Jets have to draft him.  He would transform the offensive line to perhaps the most dominant line in the NFL. If we get Thuney or Lindsley, having Sewell and Be

This is my dream draft if we're sticking with Sam:   -Big Ticket goes to RT and I'd let his buddy Clark play alongside him at RG.   -McGovern goes to LG to stabilize the two rooki

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33 minutes ago, bitonti said:

 

1. Penei Sewell, Oregon
6’5”, 325 pounds; JR

Right off the bat – the athletic profile for Sewell gives him Hall of Fame potential. He is a dominant blocker in that zone run game, working off combo-blocks and engulfing linebackers at the second level, often times being able to deliver a good bump on down-lineman and then still having the mobility and quickness in the lower body to get hands on the backer in very unfavorable settings. The absurd mobility for his size is displayed when he is asked to execute skip-pulls, but more consistently the ability to scoop-block defenders in the B-gap on wide zone plays, where he really pulls that outside foot to the far hip of the man. Because of which you see three-techniques and linebackers take much flatter angles than they usually would, to not get scooped/sealed and then Sewell can transition into just riding them, to create cutback opportunities. On the frontside of those plays, there are no issues in terms of getting to the outside edge of 7-techniques or even further away and seal them inside, but I have also seen Sewell set that first wide step for reach-blocks and the edge defender instantly realizing it and shooting the B-gap, but Sewell still has those long arms to grab the near pad and kind of pin the man inside, to allow the ball-carrier to get out to the edge anyway, However, he is far from just a finesse blocker, bringing plenty of umph at initial contact, often times uprooting B-gap defenders in more vertical schemes, while doing a good job of attacking the near half of edge guys on down-blocks, to establish a wall-off position and then at times driving him close to the sideline.

In the pass game, Sewell has truly special feet to match twitchy rushers and he is such an easy mover. There are certainly some refinements that need to be made to the technique in his sets – which I’ll get to in the next paragraph – but you know he can get himself into position to engage and mirror with the best of them. Sewell has that inside hand ready to take steam off anybody slanting hard into the B-gap or possibly pick them up. and even when he is late to recognize twists, he has the quick feet and hip mobility to recover anyway. If he does see it, with his man being the first to cross, he gives that guy a good shove, to make the job easier for the guard next to him. Sewell is so explosive out of his stance, that he can get to wide alignments and initiate contact on play-action with very aggressive angles and rarely ever whiff. And in the screen game, his athleticism can really shine, where he uses swim-moves to release and then puts DBs on their backs. Something that is just mind-boggling to watch for me is when he actually seals wide nine’s or split-the-difference backers (OT to slot) on swing screens, or takes out slot defenders on tunnel screens. Sewell only surrendered eight total pressures on 215 pass-pro snaps in 2018 and as a true sophomore, he finished with PFF’s highest grade among all offensive linemen at only 19 years old, with just two hits on the QB on almost 500 pass-blocking snaps.

In terms of the negatives, when Sewell is away from the point of attack is asked to just seal his man, he can get a little lazy. And he is guilty of overextending at times, when trying to put hands on targets in space. However, his bigger technical issues are in pass-pro, where he tends to shoot his first punch before his man is actually in range for engaging proper contact and he ends up kind of catching rushers, while getting way too tall. He also picks up that inside foot way too much, when he doesn’t need to at all. Overall, to me there is too much bobbing, rather than stepping and sliding and he doesn’t make great use of his length, to keep rushers at bay and force them to take wider angles. And there just weren’t a ton of true drop-backs in that Oregon offense anyway, because of how much they ran the ball and how horizontal the passing attack was.

As you can tell, other than wanting to be a little more aggressiveness when he isn’t directly at the point of attack, the problems with Sewell are all technical ones, that can be fixed with proper coaching. This guy dominated as a 19-year old and still has room to grow, in terms of learning the intricacies at the position. I have been following the draft for about a decade now and studied it in-depth for the latter half of it – this is the best OT prospect I have ever watched.

 

If we don’t take Sewell at 2 draft Pitts and trade 23 and 33 to move up and draft Slater

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52 minutes ago, bitonti said:

 

1. Penei Sewell, Oregon
6’5”, 325 pounds; JR

Right off the bat – the athletic profile for Sewell gives him Hall of Fame potential. He is a dominant blocker in that zone run game, working off combo-blocks and engulfing linebackers at the second level, often times being able to deliver a good bump on down-lineman and then still having the mobility and quickness in the lower body to get hands on the backer in very unfavorable settings. The absurd mobility for his size is displayed when he is asked to execute skip-pulls, but more consistently the ability to scoop-block defenders in the B-gap on wide zone plays, where he really pulls that outside foot to the far hip of the man. Because of which you see three-techniques and linebackers take much flatter angles than they usually would, to not get scooped/sealed and then Sewell can transition into just riding them, to create cutback opportunities. On the frontside of those plays, there are no issues in terms of getting to the outside edge of 7-techniques or even further away and seal them inside, but I have also seen Sewell set that first wide step for reach-blocks and the edge defender instantly realizing it and shooting the B-gap, but Sewell still has those long arms to grab the near pad and kind of pin the man inside, to allow the ball-carrier to get out to the edge anyway, However, he is far from just a finesse blocker, bringing plenty of umph at initial contact, often times uprooting B-gap defenders in more vertical schemes, while doing a good job of attacking the near half of edge guys on down-blocks, to establish a wall-off position and then at times driving him close to the sideline.

In the pass game, Sewell has truly special feet to match twitchy rushers and he is such an easy mover. There are certainly some refinements that need to be made to the technique in his sets – which I’ll get to in the next paragraph – but you know he can get himself into position to engage and mirror with the best of them. Sewell has that inside hand ready to take steam off anybody slanting hard into the B-gap or possibly pick them up. and even when he is late to recognize twists, he has the quick feet and hip mobility to recover anyway. If he does see it, with his man being the first to cross, he gives that guy a good shove, to make the job easier for the guard next to him. Sewell is so explosive out of his stance, that he can get to wide alignments and initiate contact on play-action with very aggressive angles and rarely ever whiff. And in the screen game, his athleticism can really shine, where he uses swim-moves to release and then puts DBs on their backs. Something that is just mind-boggling to watch for me is when he actually seals wide nine’s or split-the-difference backers (OT to slot) on swing screens, or takes out slot defenders on tunnel screens. Sewell only surrendered eight total pressures on 215 pass-pro snaps in 2018 and as a true sophomore, he finished with PFF’s highest grade among all offensive linemen at only 19 years old, with just two hits on the QB on almost 500 pass-blocking snaps.

In terms of the negatives, when Sewell is away from the point of attack is asked to just seal his man, he can get a little lazy. And he is guilty of overextending at times, when trying to put hands on targets in space. However, his bigger technical issues are in pass-pro, where he tends to shoot his first punch before his man is actually in range for engaging proper contact and he ends up kind of catching rushers, while getting way too tall. He also picks up that inside foot way too much, when he doesn’t need to at all. Overall, to me there is too much bobbing, rather than stepping and sliding and he doesn’t make great use of his length, to keep rushers at bay and force them to take wider angles. And there just weren’t a ton of true drop-backs in that Oregon offense anyway, because of how much they ran the ball and how horizontal the passing attack was.

As you can tell, other than wanting to be a little more aggressiveness when he isn’t directly at the point of attack, the problems with Sewell are all technical ones, that can be fixed with proper coaching. This guy dominated as a 19-year old and still has room to grow, in terms of learning the intricacies at the position. I have been following the draft for about a decade now and studied it in-depth for the latter half of it – this is the best OT prospect I have ever watched.

 

nice write-up.  He will be a blessing for whichever team drafts him.  I doubt it will be the Jets, but you never know

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1 minute ago, Dcat said:

nice write-up.  He will be a blessing for whichever team drafts him.  I doubt it will be the Jets, but you never know

This franchise

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58 minutes ago, bitonti said:

 

1. Penei Sewell, Oregon
6’5”, 325 pounds; JR

Right off the bat – the athletic profile for Sewell gives him Hall of Fame potential. He is a dominant blocker in that zone run game, working off combo-blocks and engulfing linebackers at the second level, often times being able to deliver a good bump on down-lineman and then still having the mobility and quickness in the lower body to get hands on the backer in very unfavorable settings. The absurd mobility for his size is displayed when he is asked to execute skip-pulls, but more consistently the ability to scoop-block defenders in the B-gap on wide zone plays, where he really pulls that outside foot to the far hip of the man. Because of which you see three-techniques and linebackers take much flatter angles than they usually would, to not get scooped/sealed and then Sewell can transition into just riding them, to create cutback opportunities. On the frontside of those plays, there are no issues in terms of getting to the outside edge of 7-techniques or even further away and seal them inside, but I have also seen Sewell set that first wide step for reach-blocks and the edge defender instantly realizing it and shooting the B-gap, but Sewell still has those long arms to grab the near pad and kind of pin the man inside, to allow the ball-carrier to get out to the edge anyway, However, he is far from just a finesse blocker, bringing plenty of umph at initial contact, often times uprooting B-gap defenders in more vertical schemes, while doing a good job of attacking the near half of edge guys on down-blocks, to establish a wall-off position and then at times driving him close to the sideline.

In the pass game, Sewell has truly special feet to match twitchy rushers and he is such an easy mover. There are certainly some refinements that need to be made to the technique in his sets – which I’ll get to in the next paragraph – but you know he can get himself into position to engage and mirror with the best of them. Sewell has that inside hand ready to take steam off anybody slanting hard into the B-gap or possibly pick them up. and even when he is late to recognize twists, he has the quick feet and hip mobility to recover anyway. If he does see it, with his man being the first to cross, he gives that guy a good shove, to make the job easier for the guard next to him. Sewell is so explosive out of his stance, that he can get to wide alignments and initiate contact on play-action with very aggressive angles and rarely ever whiff. And in the screen game, his athleticism can really shine, where he uses swim-moves to release and then puts DBs on their backs. Something that is just mind-boggling to watch for me is when he actually seals wide nine’s or split-the-difference backers (OT to slot) on swing screens, or takes out slot defenders on tunnel screens. Sewell only surrendered eight total pressures on 215 pass-pro snaps in 2018 and as a true sophomore, he finished with PFF’s highest grade among all offensive linemen at only 19 years old, with just two hits on the QB on almost 500 pass-blocking snaps.

In terms of the negatives, when Sewell is away from the point of attack is asked to just seal his man, he can get a little lazy. And he is guilty of overextending at times, when trying to put hands on targets in space. However, his bigger technical issues are in pass-pro, where he tends to shoot his first punch before his man is actually in range for engaging proper contact and he ends up kind of catching rushers, while getting way too tall. He also picks up that inside foot way too much, when he doesn’t need to at all. Overall, to me there is too much bobbing, rather than stepping and sliding and he doesn’t make great use of his length, to keep rushers at bay and force them to take wider angles. And there just weren’t a ton of true drop-backs in that Oregon offense anyway, because of how much they ran the ball and how horizontal the passing attack was.

As you can tell, other than wanting to be a little more aggressiveness when he isn’t directly at the point of attack, the problems with Sewell are all technical ones, that can be fixed with proper coaching. This guy dominated as a 19-year old and still has room to grow, in terms of learning the intricacies at the position. I have been following the draft for about a decade now and studied it in-depth for the latter half of it – this is the best OT prospect I have ever watched.

 

Ill wait for the pro day before judgement , i mean he hasnt played this year .

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On 2/27/2021 at 4:07 PM, Alka said:

If he really is that good, then the Jets have to draft him.  He would transform the offensive line to perhaps the most dominant line in the NFL.

If we get Thuney or Lindsley, having Sewell and Becton as bookends, then Darnold can just sit back in the pocket.  Our running backs don't need to be great, just good.  Get a wide receiver at #23, and a running back at #34, and we're set.

The Jets will have the identity they have been looking for finally for the next decade.  

It's that time of the year to dream, and that is my dream!

 

Ever! Spare me. His agent is really earning his money.

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24 minutes ago, Scotty Wooty Doo Doo said:

Ill wait for the pro day before judgement , i mean he hasnt played this year .

Because he had nothing to prove 

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On 2/27/2021 at 1:07 PM, Alka said:

If he really is that good, then the Jets have to draft him.  He would transform the offensive line to perhaps the most dominant line in the NFL.

If we get Thuney or Lindsley, having Sewell and Becton as bookends, then Darnold can just sit back in the pocket.  Our running backs don't need to be great, just good.  Get a wide receiver at #23, and a running back at #34, and we're set.

The Jets will have the identity they have been looking for finally for the next decade.  

It's that time of the year to dream, and that is my dream!

 

Ever? how can that be true, so he is so good in college, so much better than everyone else ever? How would you even rationalize that?

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13 minutes ago, BornJetsFan1983 said:

Ever? how can that be true, so he is so good in college, so much better than everyone else ever? How would you even rationalize that?

I didn't say it; PFF said it.  The PFF said that this is the best college linebacker "ever".

The PFF analyzes every single play and grades the players on them.  

If the Jets had a choice of picking Becton or Sewell in last years draft, the Jets would have taken Sewell.  So would every other team that picked an offensive tackle before him.

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31 minutes ago, Alka said:

I didn't say it; PFF said it.  The PFF said that this is the best college linebacker "ever".

The PFF analyzes every single play and grades the players on them.  

If the Jets had a choice of picking Becton or Sewell in last years draft, the Jets would have taken Sewell.  So would every other team that picked an offensive tackle before him.

right I get what you are saying, that they said it, but just the smell test I can't imagine how that could be true with any degree of certianty you know what i mean? SO this guy is so good no one every could get past him, he has never been beat, he is like twice as strong and quick as everyone else? I ma just curios on the reasons...It seems so hard for me to accept he is the best ever. I mean I am all in on picking him at 2, i really am good with that. As much as I want more picks...I would be 100 percent taking him or another top lineman candidate. I think Becton is something else and think he will be best of this clasee at the position - his sie is incredible.

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7 hours ago, bitonti said:

 

1. Penei Sewell, Oregon
6’5”, 325 pounds; JR

Right off the bat – the athletic profile for Sewell gives him Hall of Fame potential. He is a dominant blocker in that zone run game, working off combo-blocks and engulfing linebackers at the second level, often times being able to deliver a good bump on down-lineman and then still having the mobility and quickness in the lower body to get hands on the backer in very unfavorable settings. The absurd mobility for his size is displayed when he is asked to execute skip-pulls, but more consistently the ability to scoop-block defenders in the B-gap on wide zone plays, where he really pulls that outside foot to the far hip of the man. Because of which you see three-techniques and linebackers take much flatter angles than they usually would, to not get scooped/sealed and then Sewell can transition into just riding them, to create cutback opportunities. On the frontside of those plays, there are no issues in terms of getting to the outside edge of 7-techniques or even further away and seal them inside, but I have also seen Sewell set that first wide step for reach-blocks and the edge defender instantly realizing it and shooting the B-gap, but Sewell still has those long arms to grab the near pad and kind of pin the man inside, to allow the ball-carrier to get out to the edge anyway, However, he is far from just a finesse blocker, bringing plenty of umph at initial contact, often times uprooting B-gap defenders in more vertical schemes, while doing a good job of attacking the near half of edge guys on down-blocks, to establish a wall-off position and then at times driving him close to the sideline.

In the pass game, Sewell has truly special feet to match twitchy rushers and he is such an easy mover. There are certainly some refinements that need to be made to the technique in his sets – which I’ll get to in the next paragraph – but you know he can get himself into position to engage and mirror with the best of them. Sewell has that inside hand ready to take steam off anybody slanting hard into the B-gap or possibly pick them up. and even when he is late to recognize twists, he has the quick feet and hip mobility to recover anyway. If he does see it, with his man being the first to cross, he gives that guy a good shove, to make the job easier for the guard next to him. Sewell is so explosive out of his stance, that he can get to wide alignments and initiate contact on play-action with very aggressive angles and rarely ever whiff. And in the screen game, his athleticism can really shine, where he uses swim-moves to release and then puts DBs on their backs. Something that is just mind-boggling to watch for me is when he actually seals wide nine’s or split-the-difference backers (OT to slot) on swing screens, or takes out slot defenders on tunnel screens. Sewell only surrendered eight total pressures on 215 pass-pro snaps in 2018 and as a true sophomore, he finished with PFF’s highest grade among all offensive linemen at only 19 years old, with just two hits on the QB on almost 500 pass-blocking snaps.

In terms of the negatives, when Sewell is away from the point of attack is asked to just seal his man, he can get a little lazy. And he is guilty of overextending at times, when trying to put hands on targets in space. However, his bigger technical issues are in pass-pro, where he tends to shoot his first punch before his man is actually in range for engaging proper contact and he ends up kind of catching rushers, while getting way too tall. He also picks up that inside foot way too much, when he doesn’t need to at all. Overall, to me there is too much bobbing, rather than stepping and sliding and he doesn’t make great use of his length, to keep rushers at bay and force them to take wider angles. And there just weren’t a ton of true drop-backs in that Oregon offense anyway, because of how much they ran the ball and how horizontal the passing attack was.

As you can tell, other than wanting to be a little more aggressiveness when he isn’t directly at the point of attack, the problems with Sewell are all technical ones, that can be fixed with proper coaching. This guy dominated as a 19-year old and still has room to grow, in terms of learning the intricacies at the position. I have been following the draft for about a decade now and studied it in-depth for the latter half of it – this is the best OT prospect I have ever watched.

 

I keep hearign about generational talent everyyear but this dude is really being billed as it. I say if half the crap I read about him is true if we take him 2 overall - a position of need - that we call that a win for sure. 

I am really on the trade back band wagon because we can get other people to do what he does in the 2nd and third round, but damn I wouldnt mind taking him. As long as we take an edge and WR too later in the first.

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I hope we take Sewell,  and draft a guard later in the draft. Games are won at the line of scrimmage. Lets give the QB more time.

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If we don't get a huge trade down package I'd love Sewell at #2 OA. The Jets are rebuilding a disaster of a roster thanks to Idzak and Macc and it's going to take more than one year.

I hope JD sticks with his build the foundation through the OL and DL philosophy.

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On 2/27/2021 at 4:26 PM, Jimmy 2 Times said:

This is my dream draft if we're sticking with Sam:

 

603892050_ScreenShot2021-02-27at3_21_21PM.png.e1d2340a8f6f8f232f5983f5fa8e8503.png

-Big Ticket goes to RT and I'd let his buddy Clark play alongside him at RG.  

-McGovern goes to LG to stabilize the two rookies and to help with protection calls.

-Marshall can play on the outside opposite Mims with Crowder in the slot.

-Carter is a feature back that can do it all.  Very nice rotation with Johnson and Perine.

-Throw some cash at a pass rusher and let's win the east.  

Max, is it possible to add a vomit emote to the upgraded website?

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6 hours ago, Big_Slick said:

If we don't get a huge trade down package I'd love Sewell at #2 OA. The Jets are rebuilding a disaster of a roster thanks to Idzak and Macc and it's going to take more than one year.

I hope JD sticks with his build the foundation through the OL and DL philosophy.

Nah yo we fixed the OL with one good draft pick in 15 years

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3. Oregon, Fri., April 2

Who to watch: Oregon's Penei Sewell and Northwestern's Rashawn Slater are battling to be the first offensive tackle taken in this class. Sewell (6-6, 325) is a big, physical tackle with quick feet and elite athleticism who often imposed his will on defenders. He opted out of the 2020 season, but his 2019 highlights put him in elite status.

 

Once this pro day happens...Sewell will reestablish his position as the Alpha of this draft class...Years ago the Jets actually made a wise decision selecting D'Brick over Vernon Davis.  We made the mistake of trading  a pick that would have landed Orlando Pace instead of James Farrior.  Don't over think this..Draft Sewell, Get a guard in the second round or the Center from Alabama. You want to take a chance on a QB, get Trask later..Build that O Line.

 

 

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51 minutes ago, NYDreamer said:

3. Oregon, Fri., April 2

Who to watch: Oregon's Penei Sewell and Northwestern's Rashawn Slater are battling to be the first offensive tackle taken in this class. Sewell (6-6, 325) is a big, physical tackle with quick feet and elite athleticism who often imposed his will on defenders. He opted out of the 2020 season, but his 2019 highlights put him in elite status.

 

Once this pro day happens...Sewell will reestablish his position as the Alpha of this draft class...Years ago the Jets actually made a wise decision selecting D'Brick over Vernon Davis.  We made the mistake of trading  a pick that would have landed Orlando Pace instead of James Farrior.  Don't over think this..Draft Sewell, Get a guard in the second round or the Center from Alabama. You want to take a chance on a QB, get Trask later..Build that O Line.

Who wrote this dog water trash?  Draft Trask later?  What the f*ck?

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37 minutes ago, Mogglez said:

Who wrote this dog water trash?  Draft Trask later?  What the f*ck?

And the “The center from Alabama” 

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55 minutes ago, Philc1 said:

Is it ok to fap to tape of Sewell blocking edge rushers with one hand?

Not much tape out there. Missed a ton of time in 2018 with injury and then sat the year out in 2020

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On 2/27/2021 at 4:07 PM, Alka said:

If he really is that good, then the Jets have to draft him.  He would transform the offensive line to perhaps the most dominant line in the NFL.

If we get Thuney or Lindsley, having Sewell and Becton as bookends, then Darnold can just sit back in the pocket.  Our running backs don't need to be great, just good.  Get a wide receiver at #23, and a running back at #34, and we're set.

The Jets will have the identity they have been looking for finally for the next decade.  

It's that time of the year to dream, and that is my dream!

 

As much as I agree with winning starts in the trenches, the OL can only take you so far. The Jets know that better than any team. The Jets in 2009 and 10 had a truly dominant OL and yet those teams were 9-7 and 11-5. In both years NEVER good enough to win it all. Those teams were ultimately not good enough because the QB was very deficient in his play.

Ultimately I want a truly dominant OL. That's a very entertaining product for me as a Jets fan. But the league will always be a QB driven league.

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9 hours ago, Irish Jet said:

Honestly the Bengals really are that much of a catastrophe that they may pass on the perfect player for their team. If they go Chase or Pitts then Burrow is going to die. 

Jonah might be decent in the 2 or 3 games he plays in next season 

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