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2 minutes ago, neckdemon said:

the truth is that you couldn't come up with a much better plan to destroy a qb's career if that was actually your goal. the jets gave darnold zero chance to succeed. put him behind a terrible oline, with a very poor group of offensive skill players, and then let an imbecile coach the team

I don't disagree, but I think an interesting question is, how much of that do you put on the current regime? I feel like Mac, along with Christopher Johnson's decision to let him run another FA period and draft before firing him are what really did him. By the time Douglas got here it was probably already too late. He tried to fix the OL last offseason but missed on Conklin. He's done a better job this year but again, it starts to feel like the damage is already done. Even if they keep him for another year, which I'm not entirely opposed to, it's hard to see him turning into the long term answer.

The Jets failed him, but most of the culprits are already out the door. If Douglas wants to wash his hands of the situation and start over I don't think you can blame him too much.

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Comparing a 30-yard throw to a 60-yard throw? Look, no one argues that Darnold can uncork some really nice throws sometimes. His problem is that he can't perform like that consistently after thre

That was a great throw! No one is saying Sam can’t make all the throws.... it’s the timing and decision making and lost confidence and of course 

Just now, BroadwayRay said:

So the "minimum 70 dropbacks under pressure" that was cited in the post above -- you think PFF made that up? I guess you did, because most of the arguments in favor of Darnold come purely from people's imagination.

Video?

Cause this Sam play has a 300+lb dude trying to rip his head off in like 1.5 seconds.

And if you're being honest, that wasn't rare.

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55 minutes ago, Sonny Werblin said:

I'm not sure Wilson is that guy. Frankly, of all the QBs taken in the past 5 years Darnold and Wilson seem the most similar. Athletic guys that can make throws of any base.

Put Darnold in shorts and let him throw without a pass rush or DBs and he'll wow you with all of his throws too. I just don't see the Jets drafting Wilson. I could be totally wrong, but I don't see why he is appreciably different than Darnold.  

It’s you’re just watching the highlights, yes, they’re good at the same kinds of things. Go beyond that and they’re not similar at all. Zach Wilson is great down the field while Darnold was bad at that coming out of college. Under pressure Darnold turned the ball over, Wilson didn’t. The difference between the two isn’t in the spectacular but in the mundane decision making and consistency of Wilson’s play both inside and outside the pocket.

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47 minutes ago, Paradis said:

He woulda looked the same behind our OLINE with Gase

Quite possibly true and for Fields and Lawrence too, but I am not going to bet our success on Darnold improving at this point

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Just now, Tranquilo said:

That the stat charts a minimum of 70 dropbacks? You don’t have to lie to make conversation here. 

Frankly I think Jacksonville is insane to be thinking about Lawrence 

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6 minutes ago, Tranquilo said:

 

Thanks!

Some good in there, some great. Some bad, some really bad. Kind of what I’d expect from a QB under pressure.

The play at 3:30 is my fave. Total money. Rolling out of the pocket, keeping the eyes down field, looks like he had a check down option to a running back shallow towards the sideline but made a bigger throw to the middle of the field. Solid.

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1 hour ago, greenwichjetfan said:

Yikes, U mad bro?

Louis Riddick is one of the top 3 NFL members in the entire media. Regardless of how you feel about the clip. He’s very tapped into the league, very smart, and can communicate his thoughts very well.

 

1 hour ago, Paradis said:

i think the choice of Sam Darnold to make his point - the team that is favored to land wilson - suggests a more specific agenda

What’s the agenda? 
 

That Wilson is overrated?
 

Fields  is better?

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13 minutes ago, Tranquilo said:

The video is six minutes long and you couldn’t go more than a couple of plays. Believe what you want. 

Sorry, thought it was just a quick video of one play.

Just watched a couple more minutes.

Still not the same pressure Sam faced.  When that did happen, he was sacked, threw incomplete, or just quick dump off to the flats.

A lot of that pressure came after 3 seconds and was a result of him holding the ball.

Try to think what would have happened with him consistently being under real pressure in under 2.5 seconds.  Like Sam has, more than any other QB in the last 3 years.

This is a perfect example of how stats fail.

Sam under pressure:  a dude on top of him in 2 seconds.  No time to survey the field.  No time for WRs (lol if you can call em that) with no time to run routes.  In 2019 snaps flying everywhere...

Wilson under pressure:  chill back there for 3+ seconds waiting...  wait as long as possible for WR to get separation, see pressure and throw last moment.

Wilson's scenario I suppose qualifies as pressure for stats, but is it comparable?

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9 minutes ago, BroadwayRay said:

According to @Paradisthis tape doesn't exist. It must be doctored.

Do some reading beyond puff pieces. 
 

 

“But it’s the teams he did it against and the narrow sample in which he looked like a first-round pick that gives pause. Only six of BYU’s 12 opponents last season finished inside the top-67 SP+ defenses -- Houston (No. 67), Western Kentucky (37), Boise State (45), Coastal Carolina (63), San Diego State (7) and UCF (66) -- and only three of them finished in the top-half of the FBS.

Wilson tore up Boise, SDSU and UCF. His three worst games of the season -- his only three with PFF game grades below 83.0 -- were against Houston, WKU and Coastal. By contrast, comparing him to the guy he’s nominally competing for QB2 designation with... of Justin Fields’ eight 2020 games, seven were against top-38 SP+ defenses, and five of the eight were against top-15 SP+ defense (Ohio State played the No. 2 SP+ SOS). 

Wilson should have torn that schedule up, in other words. Especially considering the system Wilson played in last year, an extremely quarterback-friendly attack that runs wide zone and throws play-action off it. Play-action passes in this offense seek to cut down on user errors by simplifying the quarterback's reads, while taking advantage of throwing lanes created by manipulating the post-snap movements of defenders. PFF’s Seth Galina noted that Wilson averaged only 7.7 YPA on a mere 12 play-action passes off wide zone in 2019, whereas Wilson averaged 12.4 YPA on 88 such plays in 2020. 

And while Galina documented the NFL’s fixation with wide-zone and conceded Wilson could be seen as a perfect fit for modern offenses because of it, I agreed with his conclusion: “I worry that every time we've seen a quarterback from the wide-zone system have a great year, he naturally comes back down to earth. If the scheme made Wilson a hit in college, could he have already maxed out? …  just have this nagging feeling that the scheme really changed our perception of him rather than him changing and becoming a better quarterback.”

And as The Draft Network’s Benjamin Solakfurther noted, the specific way in which Wilson feasted off wide-zone play-action concepts in 2020 is unlikely to even be possible in the NFL (moving past even the question of rote sustainability). Off play-action, Wilson always wanted to go deep, be it your traditional 9-ball, a speed out, or a deep comeback. And that usually worked.

But as Solak pointed out, the NFL uses wide-zone play-action to attack the middle of the field, taking advantage of the space the initial post-snap false steps by linebackers and safeties has created. You wouldn’t throw to the deep corners -- not just Wilson’s specialty but his stated preference -- off this concept in the NFL because the outside corners are the only two defenders on the field whose assignments aren’t affected by the eye candy. If you wanted to throw a 9-ball, you wouldn’t do it on a play that offered Wilson’s back to the defense and allowed for the possibility of free rushers.

Wilson preferred the one-on-one deep shots because he knew he always had the protection and believes in his arm to a maniacal degree. But he often eschewed freebie throws over the middle of the field or up a seam because he was sitting dead-red, from the moment the play was called, on flinging it up for grabs deep.

Of Wilson’s throws of 20+ yards last year, 39 were attempted on the outside and only 17 were over the middle. In the 10-19 range, 55 of his passes were towards the sidelines, 45 over the middle. When you think of wide-zone play-action in the NFL, you think of Baker Mayfield or Jared Goffboot-legging and layering the ball into open pockets of space over the middle.

This is a more methodical, for lack of a better term “pro-style” offensive strategy than Wilson appears comfortable with at the moment. He trusts the power of his arm much more than the touch, so he prefers avoiding the dink-and-dunk easy completions and going for the quickest route to the end zone.

This is where BYU’s strength of schedule comes back into play. Wilson had three -- and only three -- dazzling games against top-66 defenses, Boise State (No. 45 SP+), San Diego State (7) and UCF* (66). *(Not to nitpick, but the UCF matchup in the Boca Bowl doesn't really count -- stud CB Aaron Robinson and S Richie Grant, both of whom will be picked in April, were among UCF's opt-outs in that game).

If you ran a defense against Wilson, how would you defend him? You’d take away the deep shots and force him to prove he can work the ball up the field by beating you over the middle on touch and timing throws, yeah? From there, you’d just want to ensure you can get consistent pressure on him. 

Wilson is deadly in clean pockets (97.5 PFF grade/144.2 NFL QB rating/78.2% completions/84.0% adjusted completion percentage under no pressure), but, despite his magician qualities, loses accuracy under pressure (74.3 PFF grade/98.3 NFL QB rating/48.4% completions/61.5% adjusted completion percentage).

My question is: How many of Wilson’s 2020 opponents were physically capable of generating pressure while leaving extra help deep? BYU not only played a poor schedule, but it ranked No. 8 in PFF’s pass blocking grades as a team. Wilson was generally able to hunt for explosive kill shots into the deep corners with very little downside, knowing he was always going to have time in the pocket (BYU allowed pressure on only 21.6% of dropbacks last year).

Wilson began surging up NFL Draft boards in October after an enormous first five games. In those games, he not only wasn’t sacked once, but Wilson wasn’t so much as hit or even pressured on one solitary dropback! A team with edge-rushing juice and back-half playmakers merely never arrived on the 2020 BYU schedule.

I’m not making an argument that Zach Wilsondoesn’t deserve to be a first-round pick -- he certainly showed enough arm talent last year to justify that. Where I stand on Zach Wilson is we only saw that for one season, and we only saw it against opponents quite literally incapable of stopping it. 

In the NFL, he will have to adapt. And perhaps he can. If NFL defenses want to take away his deep shots, it’ll require leaving more spaces in the middle of the field open. And we do know that Wilson excels throwing off-platform and out of the pocket, skills that helped him be decidedly above-average when opponents sent five or more rushers.”

 

https://www.nbcsports.com/edge/article/rankings/2021-nfl-draft-qb-rankings
 

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28 minutes ago, Mike135 said:

We have video of Wilson under pressure?  Where?

All I've seen are highlights of him chillin back there without any pressure.

I'm not saying it doesn't exist.  I just haven't seen any.

Just watch any of his 2019 tape. Tennessee/Washington. The results are... not as good.

To be fair though he did pull off a pretty impressive comeback against Tennessee, and his receivers dropped a ton of passes in that Washington game.

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22 minutes ago, jetstream23 said:

His Pro Day yesterday. There was some dude waving a clipboard or something near him occasionally. 

I've read about 5,000 posts on wilson and Darnold the last few months and that's the best. Brilliant 

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Way too much discussion on arm strength. Some of biggest busts in nfl history had huge arms Jeff george, ryan leaf, jarmarcus russell, etc. Sam’s decision making, defense reading, and full knowledge of the qb position, are what makes him a bottom tier qb. He had most of these issues in college, and really was a hs linebacker... His qb acumen is pathetic.

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9 minutes ago, Paradis said:

Wilson began surging up NFL Draft boards in October after an enormous first five games. In those games, he not only wasn’t sacked once, but Wilson wasn’t so much as hit or even pressured on one solitary dropback! A team with edge-rushing juice and back-half playmakers merely never arrived on the 2020 BYU schedule.

 

The above quote from that guy's analysis is simply false. Watch clips from the Houston game in the video contained in this thread and there are multiple hits, pressures and at least one sack of Wilson. 

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Do some reading beyond puff pieces. 
 
 

“But it’s the teams he did it against and the narrow sample in which he looked like a first-round pick that gives pause. Only six of BYU’s 12 opponents last season finished inside the top-67 SP+ defenses -- Houston (No. 67), Western Kentucky (37), Boise State (45), Coastal Carolina (63), San Diego State (7) and UCF (66) -- and only three of them finished in the top-half of the FBS.

Wilson tore up Boise, SDSU and UCF. His three worst games of the season -- his only three with PFF game grades below 83.0 -- were against Houston, WKU and Coastal. By contrast, comparing him to the guy he’s nominally competing for QB2 designation with... of Justin Fields’ eight 2020 games, seven were against top-38 SP+ defenses, and five of the eight were against top-15 SP+ defense (Ohio State played the No. 2 SP+ SOS). 

Wilson should have torn that schedule up, in other words. Especially considering the system Wilson played in last year, an extremely quarterback-friendly attack that runs wide zone and throws play-action off it. Play-action passes in this offense seek to cut down on user errors by simplifying the quarterback's reads, while taking advantage of throwing lanes created by manipulating the post-snap movements of defenders. PFF’s Seth Galina noted that Wilson averaged only 7.7 YPA on a mere 12 play-action passes off wide zone in 2019, whereas Wilson averaged 12.4 YPA on 88 such plays in 2020. 

And while Galina documented the NFL’s fixation with wide-zone and conceded Wilson could be seen as a perfect fit for modern offenses because of it, I agreed with his conclusion: “I worry that every time we've seen a quarterback from the wide-zone system have a great year, he naturally comes back down to earth. If the scheme made Wilson a hit in college, could he have already maxed out? …  just have this nagging feeling that the scheme really changed our perception of him rather than him changing and becoming a better quarterback.”

And as The Draft Network’s Benjamin Solakfurther noted, the specific way in which Wilson feasted off wide-zone play-action concepts in 2020 is unlikely to even be possible in the NFL (moving past even the question of rote sustainability). Off play-action, Wilson always wanted to go deep, be it your traditional 9-ball, a speed out, or a deep comeback. And that usually worked.

But as Solak pointed out, the NFL uses wide-zone play-action to attack the middle of the field, taking advantage of the space the initial post-snap false steps by linebackers and safeties has created. You wouldn’t throw to the deep corners -- not just Wilson’s specialty but his stated preference -- off this concept in the NFL because the outside corners are the only two defenders on the field whose assignments aren’t affected by the eye candy. If you wanted to throw a 9-ball, you wouldn’t do it on a play that offered Wilson’s back to the defense and allowed for the possibility of free rushers.

Wilson preferred the one-on-one deep shots because he knew he always had the protection and believes in his arm to a maniacal degree. But he often eschewed freebie throws over the middle of the field or up a seam because he was sitting dead-red, from the moment the play was called, on flinging it up for grabs deep.

Of Wilson’s throws of 20+ yards last year, 39 were attempted on the outside and only 17 were over the middle. In the 10-19 range, 55 of his passes were towards the sidelines, 45 over the middle. When you think of wide-zone play-action in the NFL, you think of Baker Mayfield or Jared Goffboot-legging and layering the ball into open pockets of space over the middle.

This is a more methodical, for lack of a better term “pro-style” offensive strategy than Wilson appears comfortable with at the moment. He trusts the power of his arm much more than the touch, so he prefers avoiding the dink-and-dunk easy completions and going for the quickest route to the end zone.

This is where BYU’s strength of schedule comes back into play. Wilson had three -- and only three -- dazzling games against top-66 defenses, Boise State (No. 45 SP+), San Diego State (7) and UCF* (66). *(Not to nitpick, but the UCF matchup in the Boca Bowl doesn't really count -- stud CB Aaron Robinson and S Richie Grant, both of whom will be picked in April, were among UCF's opt-outs in that game).

If you ran a defense against Wilson, how would you defend him? You’d take away the deep shots and force him to prove he can work the ball up the field by beating you over the middle on touch and timing throws, yeah? From there, you’d just want to ensure you can get consistent pressure on him. 

Wilson is deadly in clean pockets (97.5 PFF grade/144.2 NFL QB rating/78.2% completions/84.0% adjusted completion percentage under no pressure), but, despite his magician qualities, loses accuracy under pressure (74.3 PFF grade/98.3 NFL QB rating/48.4% completions/61.5% adjusted completion percentage).

My question is: How many of Wilson’s 2020 opponents were physically capable of generating pressure while leaving extra help deep? BYU not only played a poor schedule, but it ranked No. 8 in PFF’s pass blocking grades as a team. Wilson was generally able to hunt for explosive kill shots into the deep corners with very little downside, knowing he was always going to have time in the pocket (BYU allowed pressure on only 21.6% of dropbacks last year).

Wilson began surging up NFL Draft boards in October after an enormous first five games. In those games, he not only wasn’t sacked once, but Wilson wasn’t so much as hit or even pressured on one solitary dropback! A team with edge-rushing juice and back-half playmakers merely never arrived on the 2020 BYU schedule.

I’m not making an argument that Zach Wilsondoesn’t deserve to be a first-round pick -- he certainly showed enough arm talent last year to justify that. Where I stand on Zach Wilson is we only saw that for one season, and we only saw it against opponents quite literally incapable of stopping it. 

In the NFL, he will have to adapt. And perhaps he can. If NFL defenses want to take away his deep shots, it’ll require leaving more spaces in the middle of the field open. And we do know that Wilson excels throwing off-platform and out of the pocket, skills that helped him be decidedly above-average when opponents sent five or more rushers.”

 

https://www.nbcsports.com/edge/article/rankings/2021-nfl-draft-qb-rankings
 

I am all on board with Wilson ... but even I have to agree with this post. Where i stand .... to me he has shown enough arm talent to convince me he is worth the risk... and is a good choice to be the second off the board.

I am also mature enough to realize that there are other talents to be had in the 1st round ... Fields/Lance/Jones ... any one of those guys could end up being better than Wilson or even Lawrence ... I know what style of play I like and that would be Fields or Jones. I simply dont love the Run first QB mold.

Sent from my SM-G950U1 using JetNation.com mobile app

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29 minutes ago, BroadwayRay said:

I think him and a lot of other TV guys who prop up Darnold are carrying Jimmy Sexton's water. Sexton is no doubt a key source for a lot of media people.

super troopers yes GIF by Fox Searchlight

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3 minutes ago, BroadwayRay said:

The above quote from that guy's analysis is simply false. Watch clips from the Houston game in the video contained in this thread and there are multiple hits, pressures and at least one sack of Wilson. 

Lol false? He’s the lead CFB analyst for NBC’s roto brand. You wanna talk about egos, holy Christ. I served you a 5 course meal on the guy and this what you come back at me with?

Let’s call it a day 

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7 minutes ago, Paradis said:

Do some reading beyond puff pieces. 
 

 

“But it’s the teams he did it against and the narrow sample in which he looked like a first-round pick that gives pause. Only six of BYU’s 12 opponents last season finished inside the top-67 SP+ defenses -- Houston (No. 67), Western Kentucky (37), Boise State (45), Coastal Carolina (63), San Diego State (7) and UCF (66) -- and only three of them finished in the top-half of the FBS.

Wilson tore up Boise, SDSU and UCF. His three worst games of the season -- his only three with PFF game grades below 83.0 -- were against Houston, WKU and Coastal. By contrast, comparing him to the guy he’s nominally competing for QB2 designation with... of Justin Fields’ eight 2020 games, seven were against top-38 SP+ defenses, and five of the eight were against top-15 SP+ defense (Ohio State played the No. 2 SP+ SOS). 

Wilson should have torn that schedule up, in other words. Especially considering the system Wilson played in last year, an extremely quarterback-friendly attack that runs wide zone and throws play-action off it. Play-action passes in this offense seek to cut down on user errors by simplifying the quarterback's reads, while taking advantage of throwing lanes created by manipulating the post-snap movements of defenders. PFF’s Seth Galina noted that Wilson averaged only 7.7 YPA on a mere 12 play-action passes off wide zone in 2019, whereas Wilson averaged 12.4 YPA on 88 such plays in 2020. 

And while Galina documented the NFL’s fixation with wide-zone and conceded Wilson could be seen as a perfect fit for modern offenses because of it, I agreed with his conclusion: “I worry that every time we've seen a quarterback from the wide-zone system have a great year, he naturally comes back down to earth. If the scheme made Wilson a hit in college, could he have already maxed out? …  just have this nagging feeling that the scheme really changed our perception of him rather than him changing and becoming a better quarterback.”

And as The Draft Network’s Benjamin Solakfurther noted, the specific way in which Wilson feasted off wide-zone play-action concepts in 2020 is unlikely to even be possible in the NFL (moving past even the question of rote sustainability). Off play-action, Wilson always wanted to go deep, be it your traditional 9-ball, a speed out, or a deep comeback. And that usually worked.

But as Solak pointed out, the NFL uses wide-zone play-action to attack the middle of the field, taking advantage of the space the initial post-snap false steps by linebackers and safeties has created. You wouldn’t throw to the deep corners -- not just Wilson’s specialty but his stated preference -- off this concept in the NFL because the outside corners are the only two defenders on the field whose assignments aren’t affected by the eye candy. If you wanted to throw a 9-ball, you wouldn’t do it on a play that offered Wilson’s back to the defense and allowed for the possibility of free rushers.

Wilson preferred the one-on-one deep shots because he knew he always had the protection and believes in his arm to a maniacal degree. But he often eschewed freebie throws over the middle of the field or up a seam because he was sitting dead-red, from the moment the play was called, on flinging it up for grabs deep.

Of Wilson’s throws of 20+ yards last year, 39 were attempted on the outside and only 17 were over the middle. In the 10-19 range, 55 of his passes were towards the sidelines, 45 over the middle. When you think of wide-zone play-action in the NFL, you think of Baker Mayfield or Jared Goffboot-legging and layering the ball into open pockets of space over the middle.

This is a more methodical, for lack of a better term “pro-style” offensive strategy than Wilson appears comfortable with at the moment. He trusts the power of his arm much more than the touch, so he prefers avoiding the dink-and-dunk easy completions and going for the quickest route to the end zone.

This is where BYU’s strength of schedule comes back into play. Wilson had three -- and only three -- dazzling games against top-66 defenses, Boise State (No. 45 SP+), San Diego State (7) and UCF* (66). *(Not to nitpick, but the UCF matchup in the Boca Bowl doesn't really count -- stud CB Aaron Robinson and S Richie Grant, both of whom will be picked in April, were among UCF's opt-outs in that game).

If you ran a defense against Wilson, how would you defend him? You’d take away the deep shots and force him to prove he can work the ball up the field by beating you over the middle on touch and timing throws, yeah? From there, you’d just want to ensure you can get consistent pressure on him. 

Wilson is deadly in clean pockets (97.5 PFF grade/144.2 NFL QB rating/78.2% completions/84.0% adjusted completion percentage under no pressure), but, despite his magician qualities, loses accuracy under pressure (74.3 PFF grade/98.3 NFL QB rating/48.4% completions/61.5% adjusted completion percentage).

My question is: How many of Wilson’s 2020 opponents were physically capable of generating pressure while leaving extra help deep? BYU not only played a poor schedule, but it ranked No. 8 in PFF’s pass blocking grades as a team. Wilson was generally able to hunt for explosive kill shots into the deep corners with very little downside, knowing he was always going to have time in the pocket (BYU allowed pressure on only 21.6% of dropbacks last year).

Wilson began surging up NFL Draft boards in October after an enormous first five games. In those games, he not only wasn’t sacked once, but Wilson wasn’t so much as hit or even pressured on one solitary dropback! A team with edge-rushing juice and back-half playmakers merely never arrived on the 2020 BYU schedule.

I’m not making an argument that Zach Wilsondoesn’t deserve to be a first-round pick -- he certainly showed enough arm talent last year to justify that. Where I stand on Zach Wilson is we only saw that for one season, and we only saw it against opponents quite literally incapable of stopping it. 

In the NFL, he will have to adapt. And perhaps he can. If NFL defenses want to take away his deep shots, it’ll require leaving more spaces in the middle of the field open. And we do know that Wilson excels throwing off-platform and out of the pocket, skills that helped him be decidedly above-average when opponents sent five or more rushers.”

 

https://www.nbcsports.com/edge/article/rankings/2021-nfl-draft-qb-rankings
 

This is exactly what I’ve been trying to say about Wilson for the last few months.   When we see a major leap in production from one year to the next, we need to look at what was the reason behind it.  Going to a more simplified offense and playing MUCH weaker competition definitely played a part.  Even the most fanatical Wilson zealots have to concede that.  Had Wilson put up a similar year to 2019, are we talking about him in same stratosphere?   
 

He had 11 TDS and 9INTs in 2019, 4 of the TDS were against UMass, take those out and he was 7 TDS and 9 INTs.  Are we running around giggling and masturbating over pro day highlights of the 2019 Wilson?   

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5 minutes ago, Paradis said:

Lol false? He’s the lead CFB analyst for NBC’s roto brand. You wanna talk about egos, holy Christ. I served you a 5 course meal on the guy and this what you come back at me with?

Let’s call it a day 

Lol. It's a fact. He said there were no pressures or sacks in BYU's first five games, which includes the Houston game. The tape clearly shows that's not true. You'd see that if you bothered to take a look, but as usual, you prefer hyperbole and making sh*t up. I don't expect much more from you, honestly.

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37 minutes ago, Beerfish said:

Totally valid point by Riddick.  Those fancy schmancy across the body going the wrong way throws are cool but that is not what impresses me by the Wilson workout it was his short to medium on target short throws.  Quick release, great velocity, on target.

Oh and another thing.  Our fing oline just blows.  If Douglas thinks the jokers we have on the interior are any good at all he is not the answer.

I watched Sam's and Zack's Pro Days back to back and the difference in velocity on the short to medium is striking .Not exactly sure how people can see his skills, listen to his interviews on the BYU network and watch how he handles games and not think he is going to be a terrific NFL QB. In my mind he is a WAY better prospect than Sam was.

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1 hour ago, Paradis said:

 

Louis Riddick apparently only watches Darnold highlight reels. Still have yet to get an answer from him or any Darnold apologist about why Flacco played much better with the same supporting cast. Still waiting.....

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Wilson sucks cause he played against lesser competition.

Mac Jones sucks cause his players were too good.

Do I have this about right?

So which is the better determination of a QB?  The fact that he plays vs poorer talent but has poorer talent on his team?

Or that he goes up against better talent but has a lot better talent on his team?

These are the narratives that get tossed around here and many other places a lot.

I don't think either of them is as relevant as people think.

Josh Allen played for Wyoming.

Mahommes played in a conference where defense was a laughable word.

Does the guy have a good arm.

Does the guy have pocket presence (super underrated trait)

Does the guy process well and go through reads.

Does the guy have an accurate arm.

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