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Defensive Scheme Adjustments


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TL:DR

This coaching staff has to be less stubborn, stop shoehorning players in your system, with all the injuries wouldn’t it make sense to find out what the remaining players strengths are if any…

And being stubborn in not changing coverage on Stefon Diggs was ridiculous,,

 

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Maybe if players showed up like QW and JFM it would be easier to see what the crap is wrong. There's also a slew of injuries, so it would be hard to know what changing up the defense would do when they returned. You have a point, though. The best teams make adjustments when something goes wrong, even something small. The worst ones are scared of changing, and thus they stay the worst.

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18 minutes ago, Hex said:

Maybe if players showed up like QW and JFM it would be easier to see what the crap is wrong. There's also a slew of injuries, so it would be hard to know what changing up the defense would do when they returned. You have a point, though. The best teams make adjustments when something goes wrong, even something small. The worst ones are scared of changing, and thus they stay the worst.

I have no idea what has happened to JFM, havent even seen his name called lately, but QW is not a problem.  QW is currently tied for 4th among DTs with 6 sacks while playing the 31st most snaps.  His sack rate of 1 sack every 63 snaps is first among DTs.

He needs to be playing a lot more then he is currently.

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Robert Saleh and Jeff Ulbrich have run out of excuses

There are no more excuses for Robert Saleh and Jeff Ulbrich when it comes to their roles in the NY Jets defense's historic struggles.

By

 Andrew Golden

 -

 11/15/2021

Robert Saleh, New York Jets, Getty Images, Jet X Graphic

The honeymoon is over for Robert Saleh and Jeff Ulbrich

The 2021 New York Jets defense is currently on pace to finish as the worst unit the team has ever seen. Its per-game averages for points allowed (32.9) and yards allowed (417.1) would be franchise records.

Since Week 4, the Jets defense has let up an average of 461.7 yards per game. Their defense sits in the bottom five across the league in both passing and rushing yards allowed while ranking last in both points and total yards allowed. The Jets are also the first team to allow 45 or more points three times in four weeks since the 1966 New York Giants.

Josh Allen’s Buffalo Bills are the latest team to enjoy dismantling the Jets, dropping 45 points and 489 yards at MetLife Stadium in Week 10.

 

 

Buffalo receiver Stefon Diggs was the driving force behind the Bills’ successful day. Diggs finished with eight receptions, one touchdown, and 162 receiving yards, which is his season-high by nearly 50 yards.

On two of Diggs’ biggest plays of the day – a 57-yard bomb near the end of the first half and a subsequent touchdown grab four plays later – Diggs wasn’t covered by the Jets’ top corner, Bryce Hall. Instead, rookie Brandin Echols was in single-coverage on Diggs’ 57-yarder, and backup Javelin Guidry was left alone on the touchdown after Echols left with an injury.

Head coach Robert Saleh and defensive coordinator Jeff Ulbrich have preached patience all year, fairly expecting plenty of ups and downs with such a young team. However, after another blowout loss at the hands of a division rival, patience has started to run thin.

When asked in his post-game press conference why Hall didn’t shadow Diggs, Saleh went back to the same old well he’s been getting water from to douse the now-weekly fires: youth and inexperience.

As Saleh explained, if Hall shadowed Diggs, he would have had to know the responsibilities for each corner position. Considering the Jets’ zone-heavy scheme, Hall would be required to know the various pass-off rules for each coverage in each spot, which is too much information for Hall to handle, according to Saleh.

While avoiding overloading Hall during his second season is sound reasoning, leaving everyone else out to dry is not.

The Jets’ rigid defensive structure, a trademark of coaches descendant from the Seattle “Legion Of Boom” tree-like Saleh and Ulbrich, has been their Achilles’ heel in 2021.

The scheme predicates itself on simplicity. In theory, it allows its players to focus on the offense and less about their responsibilities on defense. In practice, it leads to a defense that is maddeningly predictable, and easily exploitable if the talent can’t compensate. The Jets do not have the talent to compensate, and now that teams have them figured out, the defense is being taken behind the woodshed with seemingly little effort.

Gang Green has been victimized by the same concepts over and over all season long, with each coming team seemingly copying the game-plan of the team before.

Screens, trap and counter runs, and trick plays – all designed to take advantage of the defensive line’s aggression – have killed the Jets all year.

On the back end, New York has become as predictable as the sun rising every morning; Cover-3 and Cover-6 on early downs, and man coverage on third down. At this point, opposing offenses know how to beat the Jets’ defense before they even get to the stadium. If the defensive staff refuses to adjust, why should they try anything other than what’s been proven to work? As the saying goes, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

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The best scheme for this unit to run is a zone blitz. Way to many time I see Hall locked in man coverage and his reciever cracks down to the safety or LBs and he's right there trailing that receiver while the RBs clearly has the ball and attacking the edge. He's  doing so because that his man and his responsibility is pass first. Also the play can very well be play action that why he's ass shadowing the receiver.

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1 hour ago, LAD_Brooklyn said:

The best scheme for this unit to run is a zone blitz. Way to many time I see Hall locked in man coverage and his reciever cracks down to the safety or LBs and he's right there trailing that receiver while the RBs clearly has the ball and attacking the edge. He's  doing so because that his man and his responsibility is pass first. Also the play can very well be play action that why he's ass shadowing the receiver.

We ran zone blitzes against Atlanta and Ryan destroyed us in that.

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4 minutes ago, LAD_Brooklyn said:

 

I doubt we ran a zone blitz scheme vs the Falcons or any team. Regardless the talent sucks so it doesn't matter what we run. It's pick your poison.

We do not have good talent but I don't think we have all time terrible talent on defense. Quinnen,  Hall, Rankins, JFM, Maye for part of the season. May not be a great unit, but a good DC would scheme his way to a few 3 and outs and a couple of FGs during a game. 

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If the talent doesn't fit the scheme, GOOD coaches, adjust their scheme to fit players strengths.  I have not see where this has happened in any game this year...  There scheme is not working, as the article states teams are using the same blueprint to beat this team.....

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