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Stephen Ross offered Brian Flores $100,000 for each game he lost/ Flores also suing Giants for racism


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27 minutes ago, Warfish said:

 

No one applies.  That's kinda the difference here.

That was a joke or rather, a turn of a phrase. 

But clearly SCOTUS appointments have increasingly become more and more politically polarizing. 

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Just now, DetroitRed said:

Blacks achieve more wealth in America than any other place on the face of the planet, and it’s not even close.  Some of us take advantage of that.  Others don’t 

And still not even close to white people wealth 

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2 minutes ago, Peace Frog said:

That was a joke or rather, a turn of a phrase. 

But clearly SCOTUS appointments have increasingly become more and more politically polarizing. 

Well yeah no sh*t they have. Before it was just white men. We accepted it. 

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Just now, BallinPB said:

I don't subscribe to the NY Times and cant read that article.  How does it refute what I said though.  You think a rich black kid isn't miles ahead of a poor/middle class white kid in being successful?  

The research is about how black kids from rich families don’t have the same success as white kids from rich families: 

“Black boys raised in America, even in the wealthiest families and living in some of the most well-to-do neighborhoods, still earn less in adulthood than white boys with similar backgrounds, according to a sweeping new study that traced the lives of millions of children.

White boys who grow up rich are likely to remain that way. Black boys raised at the top, however, are more likely to become poor than to stay wealthy in their own adult households.”

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13 minutes ago, The Crusher said:

Just so everybody remembers this is Jetnation and we still don't allow politics, racism, hate speech and religion? Yeah, those. I do appreciate everyone staying relatively civil and not getting too out of hand but just try and keep in mind of the rules. Thanks. I only read this page so please don't mistake me for someone that knows what's happening here. Thanks.

Sure.  Now.

lol

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Just now, oatmeal said:

Holy hell, this is going to get ugly.

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13 minutes ago, BallinPB said:

Equitable in the opportunity.  I think 100% here are on board with that.  

I think more recently wokeness started with the Me Two movement esp with all of the revelations of sexual harassment in the workplace etc. And then like with anything that challenges politics and ethics there were and are overuses of it. If you said one stupid thing online ten years ago you could get in trouble for it, even lose a job, etc. Wokeness is also about language and feelings spanning over the generation gap. Like with all younger generations they speak in a different language and have their own ideals. My parents didn't get what I was saying or where I was coming from. I have kids in their 20s and 30s. My 25 year old daughter sometimes gives me language tests because I don’t know those terms. I’m ok with it you always have hope that the new generation will improve things and boy is there a lot to improve on. 

 

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Just now, Tranquilo said:

The research is about how black kids from rich families don’t have the same success as white kids from rich families: 

“Black boys raised in America, even in the wealthiest families and living in some of the most well-to-do neighborhoods, still earn less in adulthood than white boys with similar backgrounds, according to a sweeping new study that traced the lives of millions of children.

White boys who grow up rich are likely to remain that way. Black boys raised at the top, however, are more likely to become poor than to stay wealthy in their own adult households.”

So the question is.  Why is that?  Have to dig a little deeper to understand why that is.  Any social scientist would be looking at the data in this group and dissecting it to understand exactly what that problem is.  I would need to look at some actual research papers and not a New York Times article to make any conclusions about that.  But I can say that you may be making a point about that.  

It doesn't refute the fact that black kids from rich families will have more success than poor or middle class kids from white families so in fact it's more about wealth than race even though race may play a role.    

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1 minute ago, munchmemory said:

After these revelations, anyone really doubt that at least some NFL games are fixed?  I've been on my soapbox about this for decades.

Oh I thought that was so you could reach the top shelf in the fridge. Good to know. 

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20 minutes ago, Matt39 said:

I’ve always found it interesting that the most redlined and segregated places are in the wealthy progressive enclaves of the northeast.

Same. I live in Texas and can say it’s less segregated than the northeast. There were some legit stuff done in Texas though. My paster mentioned how municipalities would create highways to separate black and white communities. And then tax dollars would go towards developing white neighborhoods. 

But I agree with your comment in today’s world though. Could be politics. Could also be wealth. States like California and NY have a lot of wealth. So people have more resources to put up these barriers. 

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Just now, Tranquilo said:


lololol. Is Thomas Sowell the only black economist you know? He’s the go to for conservatives. Any other black economists you wanna share?

There is a great black conservative economist Glenn Loury.  Hes older now in his 70's but still hosts a regular show on youtube.  Writes articles and is highly published for his work.  I suggest taking a listen to him as he discusses these subjects in detail and has great insight.  

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4 minutes ago, BallinPB said:

So the question is.  Why is that?  Have to dig a little deeper to understand why that is.  Any social scientist would be looking at the data in this group and dissecting it to understand exactly what that problem is.  I would need to look at some actual research papers and not a New York Times article to make any conclusions about that.  But I can say that you may be making a point about that.  

It doesn't refute the fact that black kids from rich families will have more success than poor or middle class kids from white families so in fact it's more about wealth than race even though race may play a role.    

Of course they discuss why this happens, it’s an entire article. And of course your first instinct is to doubt it:

http://www.equality-of-opportunity.org/assets/documents/race_summary.pdf

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I’m actually enjoying the NFL going down over it’s wokeness. They put these woke messages all over uniforms and stadiums, and allow the most vile messages which include race and misogyny to be part of their SB halftime. They let the woke mob steer the ship, so now they learn it will inevitably crash when you allow this

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16 minutes ago, JTJet said:

Being rich and having a bunch or real estate does not necessarily make you a powerful world moving person. 

It necessarily does. We just had a real estate developer from New York be the most powerful man in the world while having a significantly lower net worth. 

16 minutes ago, JTJet said:

Governments are not making decisions based around Stephen Ross. 

Not a good argument about Stephen Ross not being a powerful person. 

17 minutes ago, JTJet said:

Governments make decisions off the Bezos, Gates, and Musks of the world. Those men are powerful. 

Using examples of more powerful people doesn't make another powerful person not powerful. The argument isn't over who is the most powerful. Stephen Ross is a powerful person whether you want to admit it or not. Not being as powerful as Jeff Bezos means that he is not as powerful as Jeff Bezos. 

I like how you moved the goalpost from powerful to world power.

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1 minute ago, BallinPB said:

There is a great black conservative economist Glenn Loury.  Hes older now in his 70's but still hosts a regular show on youtube.  Writes articles and is highly published for his work.  I suggest taking a listen to him as he discusses these subjects in detail and has great insight.  

Most black economists aren’t conservatives. Why do you take the word of the few who are? 

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2 minutes ago, BallinPB said:

There is a great black conservative economist Glenn Loury.  Hes older now in his 70's but still hosts a regular show on youtube.  Writes articles and is highly published for his work.  I suggest taking a listen to him as he discusses these subjects in detail and has great insight.  

The late Walter Williams is my favorite.  

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10 minutes ago, Matt39 said:

Thoughts on school choice?

Actually if you look at the history of school choice and vouchers it started as a reaction by some southern states against Brown vs the Board of Education and integration of schools. They tried to use it as a way to get around the US Supreme Court. But it’s up again in a case next term and good chance they will win with this court. 

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6 minutes ago, GreenFish said:

Same. I live in Texas and can say it’s less segregated than the northeast. There were some legit stuff done in Texas though. My paster mentioned how municipalities would create highways to separate black and white communities. And then tax dollars would go towards developing white neighborhoods. 

But I agree with your comment in today’s world though. Could be politics. Could also be wealth. States like California and NY have a lot of wealth. So people have more resources to put up these barriers. 

Yeah totally. I’ve moved a few times and have been in the south for a bit now and whenever I go back to the northeast it’s a bit eye opening to how segregated things still are. Plenty of yard signs, not much actual diversity. It’s odd. Redlining is still way more pronounced. Smaller school districts zoned oddly.

The school system is the first place to start to incorporate actual change. The town youre born in shouldn’t determine your school. I think that’s pretty obvious if you’re looking to tackle inequalities. I mean the SALT deduction was the most absurd thing going if we really want to get granular.

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Just now, Tranquilo said:

Of course they discuss why this happens, it’s an entire article. And of course your first instinct is to doubt it:

http://www.equality-of-opportunity.org/assets/documents/race_summary.pdf

Do you have a problem or something?  I said you may have a point on that and race may play a factor in it yet you keep with your passive aggressive comments.  I didn't say I doubt I said i would need to look more into research papers on the subject.  Am I supposed to just take you on your word?   

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