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A couple draft videos, Baldy on Wr's and Bect, Coleman and Allen on the draft....


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1 hour ago, Beerfish said:

 

 

Man, Williams looks FAST on that video. You hope he is that fast on the other side of this injury. 

Interesting comment on London in that vid too that I'd forgotten in that AVT played two seasons with him and youd expect would have a POV if asked too. 

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I would take a lot of guys over london, you see the other guys and they get open via nice routes or speed. 

As for Williams they didn't even show a few plays from last year where he took a shorter past and then just blazed past everyone.

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To be clear, I'm one of the few people who is NOT really on the WR at #10 train.  But, IF the Jets go WR at #10 it better be either Jameson Williams or Garrett Wilson.

Still, I think I'd rather hit WR later and target a guy like Dotson, George Pickens, or even Alec Pierce.

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8 minutes ago, Fantasy Island said:

Gardener and Williams in the first.  

That would be a tough sell at One Jets Drive.  Both JD and Saleh are ardent believers in building upfront and spending premium Draft capital on guys who play close to where the ball is snapped.  Sauce and Williams couldn't be much farther from the football at the start of the play.  I'm not arguing it either way, I'm just saying I'd be surprised if CB and WR were the first two positions taken given the guys in charge here, similar to how I don't think they'd go Safety either with someone like Hamilton at #10.

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5 minutes ago, jetstream23 said:

To be clear, I'm one of the few people who is NOT really on the WR at #10 train.  But, IF the Jets go WR at #10 it better be either Jameson Williams or Garrett Wilson.

Still, I think I'd rather hit WR later and target a guy like Dotson, George Pickens, or even Alec Pierce.

Austin ran a 4.32  40.  🔥 

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I think this is an interesting thread on the criticism of London in terms of sheer math. 

TLDR: Take away screens and contested catches, the guy was still having a historical season. That's both lost in his getting conflated with recent busts that had high contested catch %s AND (more importantly), not true of the recent guys who caught a lot of contested balls. 

 

At this point, I kinda hope we pick Wilson just so we don't have to deal with reading all the Jet fan self hate/anxiety if we were to draft London without his ever running a 40 in the process, but I have a bad feeling the guy comes into league plays like Brandon Marshall and we spend the season wishing Zack had someone with more size to throw to...

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6 hours ago, nycdan said:

I see numerous complaints that London doesn't get separation but when I watch his film, I see plenty of plays where he catches the ball without much of a contest.  He just tends to do it more by jumping up and turning his back to the DB and snatching the ball out of the air before anyone has a chance to impede him.  

Look at timestamp 0:15 for example.  This is a typical London catch down the left sideline.

image.png

He does it again many times.  Here's one from 2:05

 image.png

And another:

image.png

These are called 'contested' catches, but the DBs aren't really contesting anything.  They are just spectators with no position to impede the catch.  To me, that's separation.  Just vertical instead of horizontal.

I would say he sort of reminds me of Eric Decker, who wasn't a blazer, but made tough catches, and had one really impressive year here when he was healthy.  I've seen comps of Keenan Allen, which also wouldn't be such a bad thing to add to this team.

He had 88 receptions last season. 15th most in college football.  More than any of the other top guys except McBride who had 90.  And that was with a pretty average (at best) QB throwing to him.   

He's not a perfect prospect.  Not Calvin or Julio.  Not even saying I'd take him over Williams.  But I think he's got a good chance to be very effective in the NFL and am quite a bit higher on him than a lot of folks.  If we take him at #10 I'll be very excited to see what he can do and expect he'd be the best WR the Jets have seen in years.

He put up those numbers in eight games. That's the thing...

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7 hours ago, nycdan said:

I see numerous complaints that London doesn't get separation but when I watch his film, I see plenty of plays where he catches the ball without much of a contest.  He just tends to do it more by jumping up and turning his back to the DB and snatching the ball out of the air before anyone has a chance to impede him.  

Look at timestamp 0:15 for example.  This is a typical London catch down the left sideline.

image.png

He does it again many times.  Here's one from 2:05

 image.png

And another:

image.png

These are called 'contested' catches, but the DBs aren't really contesting anything.  They are just spectators with no position to impede the catch.  To me, that's separation.  Just vertical instead of horizontal.

I would say he sort of reminds me of Eric Decker, who wasn't a blazer, but made tough catches, and had one really impressive year here when he was healthy.  I've seen comps of Keenan Allen, which also wouldn't be such a bad thing to add to this team.

He had 88 receptions last season. 15th most in college football.  More than any of the other top guys except McBride who had 90.  And that was with a pretty average (at best) QB throwing to him.   

He's not a perfect prospect.  Not Calvin or Julio.  Not even saying I'd take him over Williams.  But I think he's got a good chance to be very effective in the NFL and am quite a bit higher on him than a lot of folks.  If we take him at #10 I'll be very excited to see what he can do and expect he'd be the best WR the Jets have seen in years.

4. DRAKE LONDON, Southern Cal (6-4, 213, no 40, 1): Third-year junior, three-year starter. “He’s so unique compared to these other guys,” one scout said. “He’s a problem because he’s a mismatch kind of player. If he doesn’t go Top 10 it’ll be very soon after.” Finished with 160 receptions in 27 games (23 starts) for 2,153 (13.5) and 15 TDs. “He’s a backboard,” the scout continued. “His catch radius is phenomenal. He can really go up and reel the ball in. He’s excellent on back-shoulder fades and posts, things he can use his body position. When he’s covered, he’s still open because of the radius and the length (33-inch arms) and his ability to play basketball in the red zone. Very forgiving target. He’s most similar to Mike Evans. I don’t know if he’s quite as fast as Evans but I’m not sure it really matters because he can do all the same things.” Was an outstanding basketball player at Moorpark, Calif., and even played two games for the USC basketball team after his freshman football campaign. “Intangibles aren’t awesome,” a second scout said. “It’s diva football character kind of deal. Coming off the injury. There have been some hits but there have been quite a few misses for the USC receiving corps.” Suffered an ankle injury after eight games in 2021 season and sat out the remainder of the season. Worked out for scouts April 15 in LA but didn’t run the 40. His speed was estimated by two scouts between 4.58 and 4.60. “His first three steps are explosive enough, but once he gets past five yards the lack of speed, you can see that,” a third scout said. “Everybody’s starting to sh*t on him because he didn’t run a 40. But he’s not getting out of the top 20.” Wonderlic of 19. “He can get off the jam but he can’t really get down the field,” a fourth scout said. “He can make acrobatic, over-the-top catches. He just has really unique skills, which he has to have because he’s not that fast.”

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If London was a TE, I'd love him.  No thanks though in the top 10.  He's not fast and doesnt create separation.  Even plays where he does "get open" down field, like the double move Baldy shared vs. ND.  That wasnt a good move at all, he doesnt have near the route running as the OSU guys.  In fact, it was actually pathetic double move, it was just some of the worst Defense I've ever seen.  It kind of reminds of watching Zach Wilson last year, you see these flashy plays that pop but when you watch it more closely, it actually doesnt translate because the defenders we so terribly out of position, anyone could make the play.  I've also noticed for as many underthrown balls that had to go up and get, he also creates contested balls by leaving his feet when it's not necessary.  The fact that he's a slug makes it worse.  Hard pass on London.  Hard pass.

 

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8 hours ago, jetstream23 said:

To be clear, I'm one of the few people who is NOT really on the WR at #10 train.  But, IF the Jets go WR at #10 it better be either Jameson Williams or Garrett Wilson.

Still, I think I'd rather hit WR later and target a guy like Dotson, George Pickens, or even Alec Pierce.

Pickens’ tiny hands would slide him way down my board. He’s 6’3” with 8 3/4” hands? Pretty far from the ideal for a big receiver in the northeast. 
 
I’m intrigued by London, though, especially being that he’s still only 20 years old. A lot of room for growth there. 

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Not my first choice, but think he could be a good fit with Zach and his off-script plays and could see him drawing a lot of PI flags. Just throw it up and let him make contact. Boom, flag, first down Jets.

But if we draft him and we're not throwing jump balls to him in the endzone and sticking to end arounds to Berrios, then idk wtf we're doing.

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More overall on the WR/TE class:

 

At a time when NFL teams might be overvaluing and overpaying veteran wide receivers, the rookie class this year is receiving little more than polite applause.

Oh, there’s no shortage of interesting prospects with some fast 40 times and a blizzard of stats, but those clubs hoping to draft a bona fide No. 1 receiver might not find him.

“I see guys that are going to be good No. 2’s,” an executive in personnel for an AFC team said this month, indicating there were no No. 1’s on his board.

This draft is the most mysterious in years when it comes to pinpointing how the top will play out. On Saturday, an executive with a team owning a top-10 selection said, “This isn’t going to be a normal draft. Everybody’s panicking.”

The bottom-feeding teams atop the draft are uneasy because most personnel people read the draft in much the same way. In effect, there is no elite, can’t-miss player to pick first.

In the last month, I’ve polled 17 personnel men asking them for their choice as the best player in the draft. Given the blue-chip void, one would think the increasingly valuable wide receiver position might swoop in and lead off the draft for the first time since Keyshawn Johnson went to the Jets in 1996.

Five players from three different positions garnered votes as the draft’s supreme player. Tellingly, wide receiver was a position that got shut out.

“There’s an abundance of guys but I don’t see a Ja’Marr Chase, somebody like that,” another AFC scout said. “There’s no Calvin Johnson’s, no Julio Jones’, nobody like that.”

When Johnson (6-5, 239, 4.35) came out in 2007, my poll at the time of 18 personnel men was unanimous that the Georgia Tech wideout was the best player in the draft. Jones (6-2 ½, 220, 4.39), the sixth selection in 2011, is the other prototypical outside receiver from the past 15 years.

“He’s one of the easiest picks of all time,” Chargers GM A.J. Smith said of Johnson, the Hall of Famer for the Lions, 15 years ago.

What’s the holdup this year? Six of the top eight players are uncomfortably undersized, at least when it comes to evaluators making the connection between size and durability.

“You’d certainly like bigger than (Chris) Olave, Jameson Williams, Garrett Wilson, (Jahan) Dotson,” another AFC exec said. “They’re smaller guys. You get a bigger guy with (Drake) London, but you give up the speed. You hope the separation quickness is good enough, which I think it is. (Treylon) Burks is not a real polished receiver but he can do a lot of different things with the ball. If you’re going to be a smaller guy these guys at least have the speed and the separation quickness you need at a really high level.”

The aforementioned six players finished as the leading vote-getters in a poll of 16 personnel people. Each was asked to rank the receivers on a 1-2-3-4-5 basis. A first-place vote was worth 5 points, a second counted 4 and so on.

Scouts were every bit as uncertain about the order of wide receivers as they were concerning the top of the draft.

Wilson, of Ohio State, led with a point total of 57 that included four first-place votes. Williams, of Alabama by way of Ohio State, was next with 56 (five firsts). Right behind were Olave, another Buckeye, with 47 (three firsts) and Southern California’s London with 46 (three firsts).

“You could start talking about any of them (from) like 15 down,” said an AFC scout. “There really aren’t a lot of legitimate No. 1 wideouts (in the league). Not a lot of Davante Adams. But Williams, Olave and Wilson are legitimate win-with starters. I don’t see Olave or Wilson in a league with Davante Adams or a Calvin Johnson or Julio Jones or Ja’Marr Chase.”

Rounding out the vote were Burks, of Arkansas, with 18 points (one first), Penn State’s Dotson with eight, Western Michigan’s Skyy Moore with four and two players, Alabama’s John Metchie and Baylor’s Tyquan Thornton, each with two.

“There’s no transcendent player,” another AFC scout said. “None of these guys tested crazy.”

Burks, who at 224 is 11 pounds heavier than London, is considered a risky pick. When scouts were asked which of the top wideouts had the best chance to bust, the vote was 7 ½ for Burks, three for London and Williams, two for Olave and one-half for Dotson.

Wilson (5-11 ½, 184), Williams (6-1 ½, 180), Olave (6-0 ½, 185), Dotson (5-10 ½, 181), Moore (5-9 ½, 191) and Metchie (5-11, 189) are on the slight if not frail side. In addition, both Williams and Metchie underwent reconstructive knee surgery late in the season.

Probably the two best wide receivers in 2021 were Cooper Kupp (6-1 ½, 203, 4.60) and Adams (6-1, 214, 4.55). Two of the hottest younger players are Justin Jefferson (6-1, 202, 4.47) and Chase (6-0 ½, 201, 4.34).

“I don’t think people realize how big the good NFL receivers are,” an AFC scout said. “We have a data base right in front of us. There just aren’t a ton of successful receivers that are under 185 pounds. You have to be a really good player to play at that size.”

An NFC exec countered by using the examples of Stefon Diggs (6-0, 193, 4.43) and Odell Beckham (5-11, 196, 4.40).

“Everybody says you need a big, gigantic guy in the league,” he said. “There’s plenty of good players that are not huge guys.”

The AFC man wasn’t convinced.

“Speed guys have a place if they get to the right team and right system,” he continued. “They can be effective. But it’s a physical game. Look at the corners people are drafting. The corners are bigger and faster. When those guys get their hands on them the speed doesn’t show the same way it does in college.”

Among the top 25 in career receiving yards are five players with dimensions not far from the majority this year. The group includes Hall of Famers Isaac Bruce (5-11 ½, 173, 4.53), Marvin Harrison (6-0, 180, no 40) and Andre Reed (6-1 ½, 185, 4.55), and Reggie Wayne (5-11 ½, 194, 4.55) and Jimmy Smith (6-0 ½, 200, 4.51).

From the Johnson-Jones branch are Hall of Famers Michael Irvin (6-1 ½, 200, 4.55), Randy Moss (6-3 ½, 200, 4.42), Terrell Owens (6-3, 211, 4.55) and Jerry Rice (6-2, 195, 4.58).

Of this class of wideouts, an AFC exec said, “They’re very slight and they’re fast. What we’re looking for are three guys that can play all three spots and pinball around.”

At least the failure rate at the position has slowed. Of the 11 wideouts selected in Round 1 the past two years, just one can be relegated to the bust heap. In the 10 drafts before that (2010-’19), by conservative judgment 35% (12 of 34) of the first-rounders deserve the dreaded ‘B’ for their chests.

The tight end position enjoyed its moment in the sun for a year when Florida’s Kyle Pitts went No. 4 to the Falcons. The highest drafted tight end since the advent of the common draft in 1967 had been Houston’s Riley Odoms, who went No. 5 to the Broncos in 1972.

Only one prospect, Colorado State’s Trey McBride, can sniff the first round. If the first round should be bereft of tight ends, it would mark the sixth time that happened in the last 12 drafts.

McBride dominated the poll of 16 personnel people with 13 firsts and 73 points. Following, in order, were Greg Dulcich (41, one first), Jeremy Ruckert (38), Charlie Kolar (22), Chig Okonkwo (14), Isaiah Likely (13), Jelani Woods (13), Jake Ferguson (nine), Daniel Bellinger (five), Cade Otton (four), Jalen Wydermyer (three), Peyton Hendershot (two), Gerrit Prince (two) and Grant Calcaterra (one).

“There are a lot of middle-tier guys, a lot of good backup pros,” an NFC personnel man said. “They’re all kind of the same guy, really. They’re making them all the same this year, I guess.”

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2 minutes ago, T0mShane said:

Also, further evidence we should have traded for Deshaun Watson.

then there's this

QUOTE TO NOTE

NFL executive in personnel: “I would say about one out of every five (players) we interviewed this year brought up mental health as an issue they’re having. They’re very open with it. If I was trying to get a job, I would never reveal that. Kids wear this mental health badge as a badge of honor.”

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9 hours ago, ryu79 said:

I think this is an interesting thread on the criticism of London in terms of sheer math. 

TLDR: Take away screens and contested catches, the guy was still having a historical season. That's both lost in his getting conflated with recent busts that had high contested catch %s AND (more importantly), not true of the recent guys who caught a lot of contested balls. 

 

At this point, I kinda hope we pick Wilson just so we don't have to deal with reading all the Jet fan self hate/anxiety if we were to draft London without his ever running a 40 in the process, but I have a bad feeling the guy comes into league plays like Brandon Marshall and we spend the season wishing Zack had someone with more size to throw to...

The analytics love Drake London. His production and breakout age and production share of the offense are all in line with a guaranteed minimum performance in the NFL of a plus starter. 

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24 minutes ago, Matt39 said:

More overall on the WR/TE class:

 

At a time when NFL teams might be overvaluing and overpaying veteran wide receivers, the rookie class this year is receiving little more than polite applause.

Oh, there’s no shortage of interesting prospects with some fast 40 times and a blizzard of stats, but those clubs hoping to draft a bona fide No. 1 receiver might not find him.

“I see guys that are going to be good No. 2’s,” an executive in personnel for an AFC team said this month, indicating there were no No. 1’s on his board.

This draft is the most mysterious in years when it comes to pinpointing how the top will play out. On Saturday, an executive with a team owning a top-10 selection said, “This isn’t going to be a normal draft. Everybody’s panicking.”

The bottom-feeding teams atop the draft are uneasy because most personnel people read the draft in much the same way. In effect, there is no elite, can’t-miss player to pick first.

In the last month, I’ve polled 17 personnel men asking them for their choice as the best player in the draft. Given the blue-chip void, one would think the increasingly valuable wide receiver position might swoop in and lead off the draft for the first time since Keyshawn Johnson went to the Jets in 1996.

Five players from three different positions garnered votes as the draft’s supreme player. Tellingly, wide receiver was a position that got shut out.

“There’s an abundance of guys but I don’t see a Ja’Marr Chase, somebody like that,” another AFC scout said. “There’s no Calvin Johnson’s, no Julio Jones’, nobody like that.”

When Johnson (6-5, 239, 4.35) came out in 2007, my poll at the time of 18 personnel men was unanimous that the Georgia Tech wideout was the best player in the draft. Jones (6-2 ½, 220, 4.39), the sixth selection in 2011, is the other prototypical outside receiver from the past 15 years.

“He’s one of the easiest picks of all time,” Chargers GM A.J. Smith said of Johnson, the Hall of Famer for the Lions, 15 years ago.

What’s the holdup this year? Six of the top eight players are uncomfortably undersized, at least when it comes to evaluators making the connection between size and durability.

“You’d certainly like bigger than (Chris) Olave, Jameson Williams, Garrett Wilson, (Jahan) Dotson,” another AFC exec said. “They’re smaller guys. You get a bigger guy with (Drake) London, but you give up the speed. You hope the separation quickness is good enough, which I think it is. (Treylon) Burks is not a real polished receiver but he can do a lot of different things with the ball. If you’re going to be a smaller guy these guys at least have the speed and the separation quickness you need at a really high level.”

The aforementioned six players finished as the leading vote-getters in a poll of 16 personnel people. Each was asked to rank the receivers on a 1-2-3-4-5 basis. A first-place vote was worth 5 points, a second counted 4 and so on.

Scouts were every bit as uncertain about the order of wide receivers as they were concerning the top of the draft.

Wilson, of Ohio State, led with a point total of 57 that included four first-place votes. Williams, of Alabama by way of Ohio State, was next with 56 (five firsts). Right behind were Olave, another Buckeye, with 47 (three firsts) and Southern California’s London with 46 (three firsts).

“You could start talking about any of them (from) like 15 down,” said an AFC scout. “There really aren’t a lot of legitimate No. 1 wideouts (in the league). Not a lot of Davante Adams. But Williams, Olave and Wilson are legitimate win-with starters. I don’t see Olave or Wilson in a league with Davante Adams or a Calvin Johnson or Julio Jones or Ja’Marr Chase.”

Rounding out the vote were Burks, of Arkansas, with 18 points (one first), Penn State’s Dotson with eight, Western Michigan’s Skyy Moore with four and two players, Alabama’s John Metchie and Baylor’s Tyquan Thornton, each with two.

“There’s no transcendent player,” another AFC scout said. “None of these guys tested crazy.”

Burks, who at 224 is 11 pounds heavier than London, is considered a risky pick. When scouts were asked which of the top wideouts had the best chance to bust, the vote was 7 ½ for Burks, three for London and Williams, two for Olave and one-half for Dotson.

Wilson (5-11 ½, 184), Williams (6-1 ½, 180), Olave (6-0 ½, 185), Dotson (5-10 ½, 181), Moore (5-9 ½, 191) and Metchie (5-11, 189) are on the slight if not frail side. In addition, both Williams and Metchie underwent reconstructive knee surgery late in the season.

Probably the two best wide receivers in 2021 were Cooper Kupp (6-1 ½, 203, 4.60) and Adams (6-1, 214, 4.55). Two of the hottest younger players are Justin Jefferson (6-1, 202, 4.47) and Chase (6-0 ½, 201, 4.34).

“I don’t think people realize how big the good NFL receivers are,” an AFC scout said. “We have a data base right in front of us. There just aren’t a ton of successful receivers that are under 185 pounds. You have to be a really good player to play at that size.”

An NFC exec countered by using the examples of Stefon Diggs (6-0, 193, 4.43) and Odell Beckham (5-11, 196, 4.40).

“Everybody says you need a big, gigantic guy in the league,” he said. “There’s plenty of good players that are not huge guys.”

The AFC man wasn’t convinced.

“Speed guys have a place if they get to the right team and right system,” he continued. “They can be effective. But it’s a physical game. Look at the corners people are drafting. The corners are bigger and faster. When those guys get their hands on them the speed doesn’t show the same way it does in college.”

Among the top 25 in career receiving yards are five players with dimensions not far from the majority this year. The group includes Hall of Famers Isaac Bruce (5-11 ½, 173, 4.53), Marvin Harrison (6-0, 180, no 40) and Andre Reed (6-1 ½, 185, 4.55), and Reggie Wayne (5-11 ½, 194, 4.55) and Jimmy Smith (6-0 ½, 200, 4.51).

From the Johnson-Jones branch are Hall of Famers Michael Irvin (6-1 ½, 200, 4.55), Randy Moss (6-3 ½, 200, 4.42), Terrell Owens (6-3, 211, 4.55) and Jerry Rice (6-2, 195, 4.58).

Of this class of wideouts, an AFC exec said, “They’re very slight and they’re fast. What we’re looking for are three guys that can play all three spots and pinball around.”

At least the failure rate at the position has slowed. Of the 11 wideouts selected in Round 1 the past two years, just one can be relegated to the bust heap. In the 10 drafts before that (2010-’19), by conservative judgment 35% (12 of 34) of the first-rounders deserve the dreaded ‘B’ for their chests.

The tight end position enjoyed its moment in the sun for a year when Florida’s Kyle Pitts went No. 4 to the Falcons. The highest drafted tight end since the advent of the common draft in 1967 had been Houston’s Riley Odoms, who went No. 5 to the Broncos in 1972.

Only one prospect, Colorado State’s Trey McBride, can sniff the first round. If the first round should be bereft of tight ends, it would mark the sixth time that happened in the last 12 drafts.

McBride dominated the poll of 16 personnel people with 13 firsts and 73 points. Following, in order, were Greg Dulcich (41, one first), Jeremy Ruckert (38), Charlie Kolar (22), Chig Okonkwo (14), Isaiah Likely (13), Jelani Woods (13), Jake Ferguson (nine), Daniel Bellinger (five), Cade Otton (four), Jalen Wydermyer (three), Peyton Hendershot (two), Gerrit Prince (two) and Grant Calcaterra (one).

“There are a lot of middle-tier guys, a lot of good backup pros,” an NFC personnel man said. “They’re all kind of the same guy, really. They’re making them all the same this year, I guess.”

https://www.nfl.com/news/2017-nfl-draft-trubisky-leads-qb-class-lacking-elite-talent-0ap3000000799332

 

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I gotta say, with all the talk of Jameson Williams' injury, I'm a bit surprised nobody is really talking about London being injured/injury prone. He's a big bodied, lean WR who will take a lot of hits at the next level and he is coming off a pretty bad injury and had another hamstring injury that set him back again. I mean, could be nothing, but really not a good time for any kind of minor injuries to be acting up. 

Just wondering what people though. 

Personally, I'm a big fan of Wilson and Olave (I like Williams but the injury does scare me), then I start to favor the second tier WRs like Pickens and Pierce.  

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54 minutes ago, Matt39 said:

The AFC man wasn’t convinced.

“Speed guys have a place if they get to the right team and right system,” he continued. “They can be effective. But it’s a physical game. Look at the corners people are drafting. The corners are bigger and faster. When those guys get their hands on them the speed doesn’t show the same way it does in college.”

Among the top 25 in career receiving yards are five players with dimensions not far from the majority this year. The group includes Hall of Famers Isaac Bruce (5-11 ½, 173, 4.53), Marvin Harrison (6-0, 180, no 40) and Andre Reed (6-1 ½, 185, 4.55), and Reggie Wayne (5-11 ½, 194, 4.55) and Jimmy Smith (6-0 ½, 200, 4.51).

From the Johnson-Jones branch are Hall of Famers Michael Irvin (6-1 ½, 200, 4.55), Randy Moss (6-3 ½, 200, 4.42), Terrell Owens (6-3, 211, 4.55) and Jerry Rice (6-2, 195, 4.58).

Of this class of wideouts, an AFC exec said, “They’re very slight and they’re fast. What we’re looking for are three guys that can play all three spots and pinball around.”

Oh hayyyyyy NY JETS guy! 

"Once Mims returned to the field, he didn’t show enough in the versatility department to seriously factor into LaFleur’s passing attack. The Jets wanted Mims to be able to play all three receiver positions in LaFleur’s system, which he was unable to do."

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44 minutes ago, Matt39 said:

then there's this

QUOTE TO NOTE

NFL executive in personnel: “I would say about one out of every five (players) we interviewed this year brought up mental health as an issue they’re having. They’re very open with it. If I was trying to get a job, I would never reveal that. Kids wear this mental health badge as a badge of honor.”

Jesus. What an a-hole. Snyder that you?? 

These kids being open and honest about their issues....whoa whoa, GO KICK ROCKS kid. CAN YOU CATCH!?

 

What article is this from btw?

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1 hour ago, Matt39 said:

then there's this

QUOTE TO NOTE

NFL executive in personnel: “I would say about one out of every five (players) we interviewed this year brought up mental health as an issue they’re having. They’re very open with it. If I was trying to get a job, I would never reveal that. Kids wear this mental health badge as a badge of honor.”

While I’m sympathetic to young people being aware of their psychological well-being, I would probably move guys like this to the bottom of the pile. I’m only drafting mentally imbalanced guys because they’re easier to manipulate and, therefore, coach.

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1 hour ago, kdels62 said:

The analytics love Drake London. His production and breakout age and production share of the offense are all in line with a guaranteed minimum performance in the NFL of a plus starter. 

You can't draft a #2 WR at 10, you just can't. 

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