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DR. BENNET OMALU TUA SHOULD QUIT FOOTBALL FOREVER


Barry McCockinner
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2 hours ago, Butterfield said:

Apparently he did not understand his role, and became angry and defiant during the investigation.   

Hmmmmmm IMO I am calling it a cover up???

You ask me how do I know?  I answer what's the doctor's name who was essentially negligent who was then fired?

The fact that they fired him, then leak he was "defiant" when questioned, but they don't give you his name tells you all you need to know concerning the "firing" of this doctor...

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Seems like a good kid . I hope he gets some good treatment and advice and has a long career …some people were advising Sydney Crosby to retire 10 years ago due to multiple concussions as well. This could go either way . Nobody knows . 

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5 hours ago, RoadFan said:

This is grossly unfair and bordering on ignorant.

I don’t recall Dr. Omalu making a statement to a specific player publicly before, ever?  He has had many opportunities to draw attention to himself and has not done so.

If anyone is qualified to offer an opinion, it is him.  He has looked under the microscope and seen what this does to their brains…

He's the guy telling you that smoking causes lung cancer when no one, least of the all the tobacco companies, wanted to believe it.

With that said, many people do equally or more dangerous and long-term damaging jobs for alot less money.  Or just for fun, as hobbies,

With freedom comes the freedom to risk your future health for money or for fun.  It's the players choice, not ours.

Personally tho, I'm glad I mostly played Baseball.

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26 minutes ago, Jolot said:

Seems like a good kid . I hope he gets some good treatment and advice and has a long career …some people were advising Sydney Crosby to retire 10 years ago due to multiple concussions as well. This could go either way . Nobody knows . 

Thats hockey.  Totally different.

 

;]

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1 hour ago, greenwave81 said:

IMO as a physician?

Tua should take, at a minimum, the rest of this season off and then re-assess how he's doing next year.  You are correct, stacking concussions is not good.

But while what we all saw from Tua after the hit, the decorticate posturing and all after being concussed was disturbing (especially if you've never seen it before), no one can say for certain that that physiological response to trauma is necessarily indicative or predictive of long term brain dysfunction.

Risk is an inherent factor in life....from motorcycle riders to MMA fighters/boxers to NFL/NHL athletes.  It should be Tua's decision.

Why should it be Tua's decision if the damage is provoked on a field with other players? 

I've played semi-pro sports for around 12 years and throughout those seasons I've always had a battery of exams done at the beginning of the year in order to be deemed fit for the practice of sport. If I wasn't fit, I would simply not be allowed to play.

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1 hour ago, greenwave81 said:

IMO as a physician?

Tua should take, at a minimum, the rest of this season off and then re-assess how he's doing next year.  You are correct, stacking concussions is not good.

But while what we all saw from Tua after the hit, the decorticate posturing and all after being concussed was disturbing (especially if you've never seen it before), no one can say for certain that that physiological response to trauma is necessarily indicative or predictive of long term brain dysfunction.

Risk is an inherent factor in life....from motorcycle riders to MMA fighters/boxers to NFL/NHL athletes.  It should be Tua's decision.

Fighters have to clear a whole lot to get a license. And commissions step in quite often to stop cutting, training, or even a fight altogether. At some point we recognize that the athlete is compromised and can’t make the decision for themselves. That’s why corners get to throw in towels. Head injury-prone sports are a different ballgame than, for instance, the adrenaline junkie stuff where the guy is cognizant and able to make informed decisions.

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2 hours ago, greenwave81 said:

I will argue nothing in your post....other than to say that 'Nobody is going to make him quit football' may be incorrect.

The Dolphins are on the hook here...but if I'm an NFL owner going forward, with opinions like this MD's being proffered etc., there is NO WAY I would ever sign Tua after this present deal.

Whether the $30 million guaranteed is enough for him to live on as a 24 yo is not anyone's decision other than his.  But in this present environment, I doubt Tua's getting another deal in the NFL anyway...so maybe he should hang it up.

Well, to be fair: If you can't live on $30 million at 24, then you MIGHT have some other issues.

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I would think that the neuropathologist who discovered CTE and watched how Tua's fingers curled up like they did after getting hit MIGHT be able to make an opinion that MIGHT be worth heeding?  But what do I know.

The curling of the fingers is commonly referred to in medical terminology as “posturing “ which is a definitive sign of severe neurological trauma.
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12 hours ago, SuicidalSince98 said:

No it’s not, his body his choice 

There may be serious liability for the NFL if he plays and gets carted off the field with a brain injury or worse brain dead and his family has to pull the plug.  The league has spent billions in suppressing research on brain injuries and settling with former players who in return sign non disclosures.   The league may make the choice for him in the interest of protecting the league.  

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12 hours ago, FTL Jet Fan said:

Amazing how these athletes get the kind of attention, money, recognition, and thousands of our Vets who have dealt with way worse head injuries than Tua’s (not saying Tua’s wasnt bad) get less money and are usually just forgotten about and left to deal with life after service not knowing why they are the way they are. 22 a day, TBI’s down the road can turn you sideways psychologically. Sorry for the rant. 

We treat our vets horribly, not sure that justifies treating others poorly but I get what you are saying.

 

I hope Tua is alright, if he is getting advice to retire right now he is going to get a massive settlement and money will never be an issue. His health should be #1 priority. The NFL royally F*cked this up and they are panicking. 

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8 hours ago, CanadaSteve said:

Well, to be fair: If you can't live on $30 million at 24, then you MIGHT have some other issues.

He plays in a no-tax state, not a no-tax country. He doesn’t have $30MM.

Players have walked away from the game with less banked, on their own terms, out of concern over permanent brain damage. e.g. Borland and another 49ers teammate in the same year. Borland had a great rookie season in 2014 & then retired after the 2015 draft with barely $1MM in NFL earnings, while 100% healthy. Few make that decision, let alone that early.

Tua’s a lot closer to a much bigger payday & was well on his way to that at the end of this season the way things were going for him early on. Now? Would the Dolphins or any team give him nearly as much up front instead of the same per-year avg via heavier guarantees, that he only misses if he retires early?

I wouldn’t know what’s the best advice for him. Easy to say he should walk away now, but in truth either decision could come with a lifetime of regret. If I were him I’d at least sit out a bit longer. That was hard to watch on screen.

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16 hours ago, FTL Jet Fan said:

Amazing how these athletes get the kind of attention, money, recognition, and thousands of our Vets who have dealt with way worse head injuries than Tua’s (not saying Tua’s wasnt bad) get less money and are usually just forgotten about and left to deal with life after service not knowing why they are the way they are. 22 a day, TBI’s down the road can turn you sideways psychologically. Sorry for the rant. 

The NFL is a business subject to liability.   US soldiers are protected by the US government based on the priorities of the representatives of US voters and tax payers.   The VA which is funded by the US government has an annual budget of 340 billion.  Not to mention the huge amounts of money raised by non-profits for soldiers who suffer injuries.  Nobody is stopping you from giving to one of those charities.  I make a donation to the Fisher House every year.  That's one of many great charities that help vets and their families.

You may feel Vets aren't being taken care of properly but that's not a function of the danger of the job and liability of the employer.  The government is largely exempt from liability when soldiers are hurt in the field.  Congress can and has voted to appropriate funds to essentially act as if they were liable but it's not rewarded based on legal liability.  Even in the case of Agent Orange, the government was exempt from liability even though they contracted for the chemicals and dropped it on our soldiers.  The companies who produced Agent Orange for the government were sued, they settled, never admitted liability but did provided funds that went into a  trust to help those damaged.

You can't really compare a government, exempt from liability, putting soldiers at risk and a business that's spent huge amounts of money in denial of the actual danger to their employees putting their emplyees at risk.  The company is potentially liable.  The government isn't and the government has used another mechanism to compensate the injured.   In this case the VA which is being funded by Congress.

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1 hour ago, Biggs said:

The NFL is a business subject to liability.   US soldiers are protected by the US government based on the priorities of the representatives of US voters and tax payers.   The VA which is funded by the US government has an annual budget of 340 billion.  Not to mention the huge amounts of money raised by non-profits for soldiers who suffer injuries.  Nobody is stopping you from giving to one of those charities.  I make a donation to the Fisher House every year.  That's one of many great charities that help vets and their families.

You may feel Vets aren't being taken care of properly but that's not a function of the danger of the job and liability of the employer.  The government is largely exempt from liability when soldiers are hurt in the field.  Congress can and has voted to appropriate funds to essentially act as if they were liable but it's not rewarded based on legal liability.  Even in the case of Agent Orange, the government was exempt from liability even though they contracted for the chemicals and dropped it on our soldiers.  The companies who produced Agent Orange for the government were sued, they settled, never admitted liability but did provided funds that went into a  trust to help those damaged.

You can't really compare a government, exempt from liability, putting soldiers at risk and a business that's spent huge amounts of money in denial of the actual danger to their employees putting their emplyees at risk.  The company is potentially liable.  The government isn't and the government has used another mechanism to compensate the injured.   In this case the VA which is being funded by Congress.

Very well thought out and factual post, thank you for the response. The issue I have as I have worked for the VA,  served, and worked with Vets who have had brain injuries as I suffered the same. Factually you are a 100% correct when it comes to Government and big business. I wasn’t speaking on that issue, it’s the humanity side of it as there is a major disconnect for one group compared to the other.  Definitely don’t want to get into a political discussion as that’s not what this is about. Appreciate the response. The Fisher house is vital for Vets and especially low income families, thank you for your donations to those in need. 

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YouTube won’t let me post the video, but it’s obvious he got himself a concussion on the hit against Buffalo. He fell straight back, and his head snapped to the turf. He gets up, stumbles down, and then stutters up again before the trainers run out. There’s no way he ever should’ve returned to that game or suited up four days later. The Bengals hit was vicious, with the defender slamming his shoulder/head to the ground violently. 
 
Stacking head injuries like that is frightening. The league should’ve protected him. And if the league was going to fail in that regard, the team should’ve. If I was in Tua’s camp, I’d be asking for the evidence the league doctor was looking at when he let him back into the game. 

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3 hours ago, Sperm Edwards said:

He plays in a no-tax state, not a no-tax country. He doesn’t have $30MM.

 

Apples/Oranges.  Lets say he lost 50 percent to taxes.  I am PRETTY sure one can live off of $15 million.  I feel for the guy and the head injuries.  I don't feel for the guy who can't make 6-7 zeros work for a lifetime, when the vast majority of the planet lives on less than 5 zeros for a lifetime. 

The fact of the matter, Tua will have a tough decision to make.  And it probably would be best if he sat out quite possibly the rest of this season.  But, as it has been pointed out, his decision.  

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2 minutes ago, FTL Jet Fan said:

Very well thought out and factual post, thank you for the response. The issue I have as I have worked for the VA,  served, and worked with Vets who have had brain injuries as I suffered the same. Factually you are a 100% correct when it comes to Government and big business. I wasn’t speaking on that issue, it’s the humanity side of it as there is a major disconnect for one group compared to the other.  Definitely don’t want to get into a political discussion as that’s not what this is about. Appreciate the response. The Fisher house is vital for Vets and especially low income families, thank you for you donations to those in need. 

Appreciate your service and wish you all the best!

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13 hours ago, Charlie Brown said:

Hmmmmmm IMO I am calling it a cover up???

You ask me how do I know?  I answer what's the doctor's name who was essentially negligent who was then fired?

The fact that they fired him, then leak he was "defiant" when questioned, but they don't give you his name tells you all you need to know concerning the "firing" of this doctor...

You're discounting the possibility that  Dr. who was in charge of the concussion protocol was suffering from "sun down syndrome".

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19 hours ago, SuicidalSince98 said:

No it’s not, his body his choice 

Yeah, and Omalu isn't kidnapping him and locking him up to prevent him from playing. He's pleading with him. Cuz, you know, free speech. 

Tua can do whatever he wants, it doesn't make Omalu wrong about telling him he needs to stop. He's allowed to have an opinion and he's allowed to express it publicly. 

I have no idea if he's right or wrong. I'm not a neurologist. But HE is. 

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I think there a player concussed should not be allowed for four weeks.

A second concussion he should be out for the year. three or four cerebral incidents

the player should be forced to retire with a nice settlement. Rosters are

too small, players come back to soon resulting in further injuries

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After taking a lot of time off and spending many hours a day in a dark silent room, Sidney Crosby was able to shake his repeated concussions because he gave his brain the time and rest it needed to heal. If I'm Tua I take a page from Crosby's book and shut it down for the season. Then return next year after my brain has fully healed and with a Great Kazoo helmet.

That said, I do not know if Tua's situation is different because it involved damaged to the brain stem rather than the brain itself.

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53 minutes ago, PepPep said:

Yeah, and Omalu isn't kidnapping him and locking him up to prevent him from playing. He's pleading with him. Cuz, you know, free speech. 

Tua can do whatever he wants, it doesn't make Omalu wrong about telling him he needs to stop. He's allowed to have an opinion and he's allowed to express it publicly. 

I have no idea if he's right or wrong. I'm not a neurologist. But HE is. 

Technically, he ins not aa Neurologist. He is a Pathologist and Neuropathologist and his career has been dedicated to conducting death inquiries. He does not see or treat living patients. 

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3 hours ago, CanadaSteve said:

Apples/Oranges.  Lets say he lost 50 percent to taxes.  I am PRETTY sure one can live off of $15 million.  I feel for the guy and the head injuries.  I don't feel for the guy who can't make 6-7 zeros work for a lifetime, when the vast majority of the planet lives on less than 5 zeros for a lifetime. 

The fact of the matter, Tua will have a tough decision to make.  And it probably would be best if he sat out quite possibly the rest of this season.  But, as it has been pointed out, his decision.  

I didn't say he couldn't, or that I feel badly for him having that level nest egg at a young age. I don't know where all that came from, but you're putting a lot of words in my mouth. 

The point was, and is, just simply that it isn't $30MM. Take his agent cut off the top, then taxes.

Making $30MM isn't equal to having $30MM. From what I hear it's not like that up in Le Canadia either. ;) 

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10 hours ago, Biggs said:

There may be serious liability for the NFL if he plays and gets carted off the field with a brain injury or worse brain dead and his family has to pull the plug.  The league has spent billions in suppressing research on brain injuries and settling with former players who in return sign non disclosures.   The league may make the choice for him in the interest of protecting the league.  

all true, but Dr whoeverthe**** on twitter is not the NFL telling him to quit and when have they did anything that was best in the long run...look no further than the mentally stable 200mm QB in Cleveland.

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