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Brugler November Top 50


derp
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Really early look at where some class strengths might be.

It’s paywalled but I don’t think individual prospects matter as much as how strong positions look at this point, especially when considering what might make sense to do in the first.

11 edge (1, 4, 12, 24, 25, 30, 31, 34, 38, 41, 47)

6 OT (5, 7, 11, 20, 36, 50)

6 CB (6, 13, 15, 28, 32, 42)

6 WR (17, 18, 26, 37, 39, 48)

5 QB (3, 10, 23, 44, 46)

4 DT (2, 9, 40, 45)

4 RB (8, 21, 35, 43)

3 TE (16, 22, 33)

2 LB (14, 49)

2 S (19, 29)

1 iOL (27)

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8 minutes ago, derp said:

Really early look at where some class strengths might be.

It’s paywalled but I don’t think individual prospects matter as much as how strong positions look at this point, especially when considering what might make sense to do in the first.

11 edge (1, 4, 12, 24, 25, 30, 31, 34, 38, 41, 47)

6 OT (5, 7, 11, 20, 36, 50)

6 CB (6, 13, 15, 28, 32, 42)

6 WR (17, 18, 26, 37, 39, 48)

5 QB (3, 10, 23, 44, 46)

4 DT (2, 9, 40, 45)

4 RB (8, 21, 35, 43)

3 TE (16, 22, 33)

2 LB (14, 49)

2 S (19, 29)

1 iOL (27)

Hope this edge class tests better than the last one. Was a lot of hype last year for some overall mediocre numbers. But will be nice to be in a position to go BPA as there will be less positions of dire need, although we probably do keep investing in OL in some fashion.

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@derp paywall? I think it's free now if you sign up for the free NY Times account. 

 

2023 NFL Draft midseason rankings: The top 50 prospects in college football

Dane Brugler

Nov 2, 2022

121

In the first update to my top 50 since August, there has been plenty of movement among the top 2023 NFL Draft prospects.

The biggest riser who didn’t appear on the preseason list? Penn State left tackle Olu Fashanu, who has been remarkable in his first season as a starter and announced himself as one of the best players in the country. The offensive tackle position, in general, is showing much more potential than was expected in the summer. Three OTs cracked the updated list, but that’s still well behind the position most well-represented in the top 50: edge rusher (11).

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There are 14 new names in this top 50, including a pair of Tennessee offensive playmakers. These rankings will continue to evolve during the next few months as evaluators finish the tape-study portion of the draft process.

(Note: Asterisk represents draft-eligible underclassmen.)

1. Will Anderson Jr., edge, Alabama*

After a truly elite season in 2021, Will Anderson Jr., hasn’t quite been on that same level this season but hasn’t been far off, either. Despite opposing teams game planning against him, he ranks top seven in the FBS in pressures (37) and leads the SEC in tackles for loss (12.0).

Although his missed tackles (especially in the backfield) are bothersome, Anderson has the lower-body twitch, flexible body type and crafty hands to be an impactful NFL defender, both at stopping the run and rushing the passer.

2. Jalen Carter, DT, Georgia*

After playing sparingly over the first month due to a knee injury, Jalen Carter returned Saturday against Florida and played 20-plus snaps for the first time since Georgia’s opener. In doing so, he looked like the same disruptive force we’ve come to expect. Carter has special block-destruction skills due to his explosiveness and body control. He will be one of the first players drafted, if his medicals are clean.

3. Bryce Young, QB, Alabama*

“If Bryce Young were bigger, he would be the clear top quarterback” is something we’ll hear a lot over the next six months. While he is an outlier due his size, Young (listed at a generous 6-foot-0, 194 pounds) is well above average in several critical factors at the position. He processes very quickly and has uncanny vision to understand everything going on around him and deliver accurate throws.

Not everyone will be able to overlook his diminutive size, but I’ll bet on his special instincts.

4. Myles Murphy, edge, Clemson*

For similar reasons to why Travon Walker went No. 1 last year, Myles Murphy is going to be a high draft pick in April. At 6-5 and 275 pounds, he pounces out of his stance with long arms and outstanding speed for his size. There are several future NFL starters on that Clemson defensive line, yet it is Murphy who leads the team in tackles for loss (9.0) and sacks (5 1/2).

5. Olu Fashanu, OT, Penn State*

With only nine career starts, Olu Fashanu might not have a great body of work just yet. But he has been outstanding in those nine starts, especially considering he is just 19 years old. Against speed rushers, Fashanu moves like he is 50 pounds lighter to cut off and close space. Against power, he can get a tad upright in his pass sets but is so strong that it usually doesn’t matter. Considering how good he is right now and how much better he can get, Fashanu has earned this high ranking.

6. Kelee Ringo, CB, Georgia*

After Kelee Ringo’s standout 2021 season, including a national championship game-clinching pick six, some might argue that his play has declined in 2022 (three pass breakups, zero interceptions). However, Ringo doesn’t see many opportunities: He’s been targeted by opposing QBs just 27 times this season, which ranks 331st in the FBS.

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Ringo, who has allowed only one catch each of his last five games, is still a premier athlete with impressive speed and fluidity at 6-2 and 210 pounds.

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7. Peter Skoronski, OT, Northwestern*

Remember all the hubbub about how Rashawn Slater’s 33-inch arms were too short for him to play tackle in the NFL? Prepare for it again with another Northwestern left tackle, because Peter Skoronski’s arm length is even shorter than Slater’s (likely somewhere between 32 and 32 1/2 inches). While Skoronski could make the transition inside and be an outstanding NFL guard, I believe he has the movements and processing to survive outside. I hope he gets that opportunity.

8. Bijan Robinson, RB, Texas*

Do I think Bijan Robinson will be drafted top 10? Probably not. Even so, it’s an easy argument to make that he is one of the 10 best prospects in the 2023 draft class. Robinson has a unique combination of power and elusiveness, and he catches the ball like a wide receiver. A lot of the things we said about Ezekiel Elliott’s talent coming out of Ohio State will be repeated about the Texas running back.

9. Bryan Bresee, DT, Clemson*

After his Freshman All-America season, Bryan Bresee missed most of 2021 with an ACL injury. During a challenging 2022 season, he’s had to play through other nagging injuries and the tragic loss of his 15-year-old sister, Ella, who died of cancer in mid-September.

Even though the production won’t pop off the page, Bresee’s disruptive talent is evident every time he takes the field.

10. C.J. Stroud, QB, Ohio State*

Quarterbacks in today’s NFL can’t just be passers. They also have to be creators. When everything is on time and stays structured, C.J. Stroud has impressive pacing and accuracy to carve up defenses (his fourth-quarter toss to Emeka Egbuka last Saturday was gorgeous).

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However, my concerns with Stroud entering the season have been highlighted the last two weeks against Iowa and Penn State. The stats have looked nice, but he has been inconsistent negotiating pressure and doesn’t look nearly as comfortable outside of structure.

11. Paris Johnson Jr., OT, Ohio State*

After starting at right guard last season, Paris Johnson Jr., has moved to his more natural left tackle position in 2022 and thrived. He keeps his feet underneath him with terrific body control to adjust to pass rushers and protect the pocket. Through eight games this season, Johnson has allowed zero sacks and committed zero penalties.

12. Tyree Wilson, edge, Texas Tech

At 6-6, 270 with 35 5/8-inch arms, Tyree Wilson is big, long and strong. He is more powerful than crafty, flashing violence in his reach/hands and improved secondary moves. With his long-striding acceleration, it is easy to underestimate his closing speed in the pocket or when chasing outside. He ranks No. 2 in college football with 41 quarterback pressures.

13. Christian Gonzalez, CB, Oregon*

The Pac-12 leader in passes defended with eight, Christian Gonzalez is long, athletic and can run, which is a great foundation for a man-coverage corner in the NFL. There are areas of his game that require further maturing, but he does a great job keeping receivers within arm’s length and covering up airspace.

14. Trenton Simpson, LB, Clemson*

While not on the same level as Micah Parsons as a prospect, Trenton Simpson is in a similar mold as a do-everything weapon because of his impressive physical traits. He has sideline-to-sideline range as an off-ball linebacker with burst to close. The Clemson defense also will line him up against slot receivers or unleash him from different angles as a blitzer.

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15. Joey Porter Jr., CB, Penn State*

A physical press-man corner, Joey Porter Jr., has the movement skills and length to jam and ride receivers down the field. His aggressive nature does make him a flag magnet in coverage, which is a legitimate concern, but he loves to mix things up against the run and the pass. His ball skills and bloodlines (his father, linebacker Joey Porter, was a member of the NFL’s All-Decade Team for the 2000s) are both positives.

16. Michael Mayer, TE, Notre Dame*

With his combination of focus and play strength through contact, Michael Mayer is one of the best contested-catch tight ends in recent memory. As one NFL scouting director put it, “This guy is made out of vibranium.” While Mayer lacks suddenness in his routes, there are no wasted movements.  Everything he does looks natural.

17. Quentin Johnston, WR, TCU*

After producing zero touchdowns over his first four games, Quentin Johnston has scored in each of TCU’s last four outings. He is an impressive athlete for 6-4 and 215 pounds, consistently showing that he can adjust to throws and make the first man miss after the catch. His route running and inconsistent physicality are areas of his game that require maturity, but he can play across the formation and win at every level of coverage.

18. Jordan Addison, WR, USC*

A twitchy athlete, Jordan Addison plays with outstanding body quickness, both as a route runner and after the catch. He is undersized, and his play strength is a concern, but he has done a nice job cutting down on his drops while thriving in the Trojans’ offense. Addison has some routes on tape where you’d swear Stefon Diggs suited up in a USC jersey for the afternoon.

19. Brian Branch, SAF, Alabama*

Playing the star position in Nick Saban’s defense, Brian Branch has the movement skills and footwork to play sticky coverage against slot receivers. He leverages well in the run game, taking proper angles and breaking down to finish in space. His versatility as a free safety or nickel defender boosts his draft grade.

20. Broderick Jones, OT, Georgia*

In his first full season as the starting left tackle, Broderick Jones has been impressively consistent in pass protection. He comes close to losing his balance more than you’d like to see, mostly due to inconsistent punch timing, but Jones moves well laterally and actively reworks his hands to counter rushers.

21. Jahmyr Gibbs, RB, Alabama*

Jahmyr Gibbs is an offensive line’s best friend as a running back. His keen understanding of football geometry allows him to press, set up blocks and hit the hole. Listed at only 200 pounds, he doesn’t have an ideal body type, but his full-speed cuts make him a nightmare for defenders in space.

Gibbs is also a dynamic pass catcher, which is why the “mini-Alvin Kamara” comparison fits.

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22. Darnell Washington, TE, Georgia*

One of the most unique draft-eligible prospects, Darnell Washington is an impressive athlete for his lean, 275-pound frame. Even though he has only one career touchdown (and none in 2022), he has large, accepting hands to catch the ball away from his body and consistently moves the chains (78.9 percent of his catches are for first downs). As a blocker, Washington looks like a sixth offensive lineman with the physical hands to latch onto and drive defenders.

23. Will Levis, QB, Kentucky

One of the more complicated players in the 2023 draft class, Kentucky quarterback Will Levis is the prototype in terms of his physical tools: size, mobility, arm strength. He is durable with a high pain tolerance and has the intelligence to handle an NFL playbook.

But the on-field results have been too inconsistent. How much upside does he offer? The answer to that question is all over the map.

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24. Nolan Smith, edge, Georgia

With 7 1/2 sacks in 22 games since the start of last season, Nolan Smith hasn’t been a volume sack producer. Within the Bulldogs’ scheme and heavy rotation, though, he doesn’t have the opportunity to consistently let loose off the edge. Smith is the vocal leader on defense, a savvy run defender and has the athletic profile that suggests there is untapped pass-rush ability.

While he is a first-round talent, the season-ending pec injury he suffered against Florida could complicate his draft projection.

25. Lukas Van Ness, edge, Iowa*

An exciting up-and-coming prospect, Lukas Van Ness has impressive talent and is still figuring out just how good he can be. He rushes like a grizzly bear, using his initial quickness, body flexibility and powerful hands/reach to defeat blocks both inside and outside. Van Ness also shows up on special teams, as seen on the pair of blocked punts he had against Iowa State.

26. Jaxon Smith-Njigba, WR, Ohio State*

Sidelined by a hamstring injury most of this season, Jaxon Smith-Njigba hasn’t been able to build on a standout sophomore season that saw him lead the Buckeyes in catches. While he is average from a size/speed perspective, Smith-Njigba is a polished route runner with strong tracking skills and instincts after the catch. He will be a slot weapon in the NFL for a long time.

27. O’Cyrus Torrence, OG, Florida

At 6-5 and 347 pounds, O’Cyrus Torrence is a massive man with huge, vice grip hands to bounce defenders around the field. He is guilty of leaning in pass protection, but his athleticism at that size is impressive. With his play strength, Torrence strikes with authority at contact and quickly gains control.

28. Cam Smith, CB, South Carolina*

Like his former teammate Jaycee Horn, Cam Smith will get himself in trouble with the way he hangs on receivers, but his length and aggressive nature are positives to his game. He also has the light feet to shadow routes from press.

29. Antonio Johnson, SAF, Texas A&M*

Listed at 6-3 and 195 pounds, Antonio Johnson is physically impressive with the lower-body agility to break down and make open-field stops or react to route runners. He has missed the last two games due to injury, and his absence from the Aggies’ defense has been glaring.

 

30. Zach Harrison, edge, Ohio State

Based on freaky measurables alone, Zach Harrison might get into the first round. At 6-6 and 266 pounds, he has 35 3/4-inch arms, 10 1/4-inch hands and will run (at worst) a 4.5 in the 40-yard dash. On top of all that, Harrison is also playing the most impactful football of his career, which is a welcome sight for evaluators.

31. BJ Ojulari, edge, LSU*

While Anderson has better backfield numbers, no one in the SEC has a better pass-rush win rate than BJ Ojulari, who has missed a few games this season due to injury. He is a tick undersized, and that shows up in the run game, but he has outstanding speed and dip as a rusher with noticeable burst to close quickly on the quarterback.

32. Clark Phillips III, CB, Utah*

Listed at 5-10 and 185 pounds, Clark Phillips III’s lack of ideal size will be an issue for some teams. But the talent is NFL-ready. An above-average athlete, he moves with fluid change of direction and closing speed to regain phase and challenge throws. Phillips trusts his skills and film study, which often leads to production. He’s tied for the FBS-lead with five interceptions and two pick sixes.

33. Tucker Kraft, TE, South Dakota State*

Sidelined by an ankle injury on the season’s opening drive, Tucker Kraft is back in action and has a touchdown catch in each of the last two games. An intriguing combination of athleticism, size and strength, he might reside at a “small school,” but Kraft plays big. He has the receiving talent to be drafted higher than Dallas Goedert, another South Dakota State alum, who was a top-50 pick in the 2018 NFL Draft.

34. Jared Verse, edge, Florida State*

Although an injury slowed him down after a hot start, Jared Verse has still been an explosive force when on the field. Despite missing time, he leads the ACC in tackles for loss (11.0) and leads the Seminoles in sacks (4 1/2). The FCS-level transfer is tough to contain due to his athleticism, active hands and power through his frame.

35. Devon Achane, RB, Texas A&M*

Not much has gone right for the Texas A&M offense in 2022, but Devon Achane absolutely has been a bright spot. His speed and vision make him a nightmare for defenses, and his maturation in the passing game has been a promising development. While his lean body type makes him an outlier for the RB position, Achane has averaged 21.9 offensive touches per game this season as a featured back.

36. Dawand Jones, OT, Ohio State

The second Ohio State offensive tackle to make the top 50, Dawand Jones is a massive human at 6-8 1/2 and 360 pounds with 36 1/8-inch arms and an 89 1/8-inch wingspan. On his junior-year tape, he struggled with his balance and posture against wide rushers. As a senior, though, Jones has made substantial strides with his control and strike timing mid-slide to counter speed and protect the pocket.

Jones, still just 21 years old, is one of the most unique players in this draft and continues to rise.

37. Jalin Hyatt, WR, Tennessee*

A prospect who has emerged as a big-play weapon, Jalin Hyatt leads the FBS with 14 receiving touchdowns (11 of those scores have come over the last four games). He is raw in areas, especially as an underneath receiver, but his elite vertical speed and trust in his hands are two elements worth betting on for his long-term projection.

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38. Andre Carter II, edge, Army

Andre Carter II has missed some time this season, and his production has declined as he learns to handle extra attention from blockers. However, he has agile athleticism, long arms (33 3/4 inches) and plays with outstanding effort. It’s an intriguing mix of foundational skills for a developmental pass rusher.

While I don’t grade him as a first-rounder, Carter has a strong case to go top 50, which would make him Army’s highest-drafted player since 1947.

39. Kayshon Boutte, WR, LSU*

Kayshon Boutte was the most difficult player to rank in this top 50. His pliable body movements and acceleration make him dangerous as a route runner and after the catch. However, he might be relegated to the slot in the NFL, and the drops he has are bothersome.

Once in the NFL, Boutte could become as a productive starter or sink on the depth chart. Neither would be surprising.

40. Siaki Ika, DT, Baylor*

At 6-4 and 354 pounds, Siaki Ika is a boulder: tough to move at the point-of-attack, but can get rolling when he plays downhill. With only 14 tackles and one tackle for loss in seven games this season, Ika’s stat sheet isn’t impressive, but his nimble quickness and natural power are NFL-quality.

41. Will McDonald IV, edge, Iowa State

At 6-4 and 230 pounds with 34 5/8-inch arms, Will McDonald IV is an incredibly impressive athlete with NFL-level flexibility and speed off the edge. While he has strong career backfield production, his tape leaves you wanting more. It is fair to wonder if he will evolve from being a toolsy athlete into more of a complete player.

42. Emmanuel Forbes, CB, Mississippi State*

Emmanuel Forbes is an interesting prospect with clear strengths and weaknesses. The good? He is an impressive athlete with decent length and superior ball skills (five interceptions, tied for the FBS lead). The bad? He tends to freelance in coverage and has play-strength concerns. He looks like he is sub-170 pounds and there are missed tackles on each of his game tapes.

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43. Zach Evans, RB, Ole Miss*

Despite battling a few injuries this season, Zach Evans has been productive when on the field, averaging 6.3 yards per carry. He has already scored a career-high seven touchdowns and 23.1 percent of his carries this season have gone for 10-plus yards, which ranks top three in the FBS.

44. Tanner McKee, QB, Stanford*

A tough evaluation because of a lackluster supporting cast, Tanner McKee’s touch, vision and accuracy remain among the best in this class. While he isn’t a rush threat and won’t create many second-chance plays, he is efficient in his drops/slides or when moving the pocket on sprintouts. On some plays, he looks like Matt Ryan; on others, like Mike Glennon. The truth likely falls somewhere in between those two quarterbacks.

45. Mazi Smith, DT, Michigan*

Mazi Smith is a powerful defender at contact and hard to move, even for double-teams. He doesn’t get to show it consistently, but he also brings juice as a pass rusher. An underrated part of his game is his ability to stay on the field in any situation (he’s averaging 42.6 defensive snaps per game).

46. Hendon Hooker, QB, Tennessee

In 19 starts since he took over at Tennessee last season, Hendon Hooker has accounted for 59 total touchdowns compared to just three interceptions. He is the clear Heisman front-runner but also a complicated NFL evaluation because he’s playing in a quarterback-friendly offense with half-field reads and a deep wide receiver depth chart. There is some Geno Smith to his game, which has become a positive considering the way Smith has played in 2022.

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47. Isaiah Foskey, edge, Notre Dame*

An active player off the edge, Isaiah Foskey leads the Irish in tackles for loss (9.0) and sacks (7.0) and also has a pair of blocked punts this season. He tends to be overly reliant on his long-arm techniques and must improve his block-destruction skills, if he’s going to crack the first round. There are also questions about his best NFL position, but his high-energy play style is an appealing part of his game.

48. Rashee Rice, WR, SMU

My top-ranked senior wide receiver in my preseason rankings, Rashee Rice has lived up to that high billing. He’s leading the FBS with 982 receiving yards through eight games. With his body control and hand-eye coordination, he is a ball winner who also brings value after the catch.

49. Drew Sanders, LB, Arkansas*

An Alabama transfer, Drew Sanders is an impressive size/speed athlete. The Razorbacks have used him as both a mike linebacker and pass rusher, and he leads the SEC with 6 1/2 sacks. Sanders needs to improve his take-on skills and cut down on the wasted steps, but he is a young player with a ton of talent.

50. Cody Mauch, OT/G, North Dakota State

North Dakota State has had a good run of producing draft picks along the offensive line, but Cody Mauch has the talent to be the best of the group. A former walk-on tight end, Mauch has impressive athletic traits with the glass-eating personality that NFL coaches covet up front. Regardless if he stays at tackle or moves inside to guard, Mauch has NFL starting potential.

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Thanks for sharing. 
 

I haven’t started looking into these guys yet, but I’m keeping tabs on the DTs and LBs. 
 

it seems like there is a huge gap with the DTS there are 2 in the top 10 then nothing until the 40s. 
 

ideally I think having a cheap rookie contract guy next to Q will really help keep the D successful while not too expensive 

Simpson and Sanders seem interesting as a fit for the D. The project LBs have been unsuccessful thus far 

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I struggle to keep all of the different forums' formal or informal policies for posting subscription stuff, forgot it was cool here. Thank for posting @maury77

 I don't think there's a clear big need/value fit if the Jets are in the mid first but the needs aren't as obvious as past years. Based on this list I could rationalize almost anything except outside corner, running back, and interior OL in the first and interior OL is just a function of the class. Process may give a little window into how they want to build this thing, where they think they are at some spots, and how dug in they are at others.

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1 hour ago, derp said:

I struggle to keep all of the different forums' formal or informal policies for posting subscription stuff, forgot it was cool here. Thank for posting @maury77

 I don't think there's a clear big need/value fit if the Jets are in the mid first but the needs aren't as obvious as past years. Based on this list I could rationalize almost anything except outside corner, running back, and interior OL in the first and interior OL is just a function of the class. Process may give a little window into how they want to build this thing, where they think they are at some spots, and how dug in they are at others.

But I don’t pay for the content, it’s free. You just have a limit to the number of free articles you can see in a given month.

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26 minutes ago, maury77 said:

But I don’t pay for the content, it’s free. You just have a limit to the number of free articles you can see in a given month.

I got you haha, I think on this forum stuff you actually do pay for is still okay to post - Athletic used to be something folks had to pay for. Not worth a lengthy exchange, was my mistake in every possible way. I appreciate you posting!

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I've seen him listed as a top 10-15 pick. But if he's (Jared Verse, edge, Florida State) is available with our 1st, then we'll have to go BPA and selected him. 

I thought Paris Johnson Jr., OT, Ohio State being ranked 11th was sort of high compared to the rest of the evaluators but that's a guy I would definitely target in the 20s. 

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I think he’s a little too big and in college he definitely isn’t asked to play the style he’d be asked to play here but I wonder a little about Mazi Smith. Maybe just because I can picture Saleh talking about him in an interview. But top of the freaks list heading into the season, evidently a leader and strong culture guy, and a second round guy now. Think the fit is unfortunately a little off but he’s an interesting guy at a position of need, and I think may go in the right area of the draft to take a toolsy iDL with good intangibles.

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On 11/9/2022 at 10:41 AM, maury77 said:

I think Becton's career might be over, but I think MItchell might pan out as a starting RT. 

Not to overstate it but the scouting report made clear that he was a prospect for either side.  He just needed a year in a pro strength program.  Mitchell is quite valuable imo. 

As for Becton, it sure does not look good for the big fella.  But I know that he takes the job by force if he comes into camp healthy and in shape.  The seven games of film he put up exceed anything we have had.  Even old man Brown's play - which has been stellar - does not compare to Becton's movement skills in the second level.  

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