Jump to content

Joe Willie was a better long ball thrower than Mahomes or Rodgers


Recommended Posts

37 minutes ago, johnnysd said:

If you have never seen Namath play and looked just at his stats you would think he was overrated. But if you saw him play he is one of the most gifted passers of the ball ever. He had a bigger arm than Josh Allen

That’s a bit of a stretch. Allen has a freaking cannon.

I saw Joe going back to his last season at Bama, and he was gifted for sure, but in truth there were as many moments when he made you want to pull the hair out of your head as there were when you wanted to cheer him. 
We love to romanticize our heros, (he’s the guy who made me a Jets fan) but he also threw a ton of dumb interceptions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

44 minutes ago, hmhertz said:

His most memorable moment in those four seasons came on September 24, 1972, when he and his boyhood idol Johnny Unitas combined for 872 passing yards in Baltimore. Namath threw for 496 yards and six touchdowns and Unitas 376 yards and three in a 44–34 New York victory over the Colts, its first against Baltimore since Super Bowl III. The game is considered by many NFL experts to be the finest display of passing in a single game in league history

I remember the game. It was so much fun to watch them both air it out that day. Johnny U was at the end of the road, but he woke up the echoes that day. 
It was like watching a great heavyweight fight with both going toe to toe. At the end Joe simply outlasted him, and the Jets won the game.

@T0mShane is right though, those two secondaries were out to lunch the entire day. Everything Joe and Johnny threw up there connected with a WR who was wide open.

  • Upvote 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Green Ghost said:

I remember the game. It was so much fun to watch them both air it out that day. Johnny U was at the end of the road, but he woke up the echoes that day. 
It was like watching a great heavyweight fight with both going toe to toe. At the end Joe simply outlasted him, and the Jets won the game.

@T0mShane is right though, those two secondaries were out to lunch the entire day. Everything Joe and Johnny threw up there connected with a WR who was wide open.

That game used to be on YouTube not sure if it is still there. You are older than me but I do remember his play pretty well, and I do think he had a bigger arm than Allen, but they are both monsters. I was really a Namath fan first and then a Jets fan.

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, hmhertz said:

His most memorable moment in those four seasons came on September 24, 1972, when he and his boyhood idol Johnny Unitas combined for 872 passing yards in Baltimore. Namath threw for 496 yards and six touchdowns and Unitas 376 yards and three in a 44–34 New York victory over the Colts, its first against Baltimore since Super Bowl III. The game is considered by many NFL experts to be the finest display of passing in a single game in league history

If Joe Namath played in today’s NFL, he would own the league. I saw him play, nobody threw like Broadway Joe.

  • Upvote 1
  • Post of the Week 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

47 minutes ago, Green Ghost said:

That’s a bit of a stretch. Allen has a freaking cannon.

I saw Joe going back to his last season at Bama, and he was gifted for sure, but in truth there were as many moments when he made you want to pull the hair out of your head as there were when you wanted to cheer him. 
We love to romanticize our heros, (he’s the guy who made me a Jets fan) but he also threw a ton of dumb interceptions.

Yeah, but Allen didn't bang Ann Margret

  • Post of the Week 1
  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It’s funny, but the play against the Bengals when Mahomes got pushed a few feet off of bounds would have been a “play on” when Joe played. The QB’s today don’t know how easy they have it. In his dsy, if they were reviewing the roughing the QB penalty it would have been to eliminate it altogether.?

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, hmhertz said:

His most memorable moment in those four seasons came on September 24, 1972, when he and his boyhood idol Johnny Unitas combined for 872 passing yards in Baltimore. Namath threw for 496 yards and six touchdowns and Unitas 376 yards and three in a 44–34 New York victory over the Colts, its first against Baltimore since Super Bowl III. The game is considered by many NFL experts to be the finest display of passing in a single game in league history

I saw that game. I was there. Look at the film. I'm the one waving.  One of the all-time top 10 games ever.

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, Green Ghost said:

Another one that immediately comes to mind is the Chargers-Miami playoff game, sometimes referred to as the Kellen Winslow game.

I also saw that game. I was there. Look at the film. I'm the one waving.  One of the all-time top 10 games ever. Lets not forget this one:

1974 Playoffs .....Raiders VS. Dolphins when Stabler was tripped up and in the red zone and flipped the ball in the air and was miraculously caught by Clarence Davis. for the win!  

In a 1974 AFC Division Playoff game at the Oakland Coliseum, the two-time defending Super Bowl champion Miami Dolphins held a 26-21 lead over the Raiders in the final minute when the Raiders reached the Miami eight-yard-line. However, it appeared that Stabler was about to be sacked by Dolphins defensive end Vern Den Herder before throwing a desperation pass toward Davis in the left corner of the end zone. With those famously bad hands, Davis was surrounded by three Dolphins but somehow fought them all off to catch the pass for a touchdown with 25 seconds left in the game and the Raiders pulled off a 28-26 upset. “Clarence Davis couldn’t catch a cold, but he makes the big catch to win it in the last 30 seconds,” flustered defensive tackle Manny Fernandez of the Dolphins said. “It was probably the only catch he ever made in his career.” Well not exactly, but it certainly was Davis’ most famous reception. Sportswriter Dave Newhouse of the Oakland Tribune wrote that Davis made the catch in a “sea of hands,” and the name stuck, just like the ball to Davis’ hands.

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, johnnysd said:

If you have never seen Namath play and looked just at his stats you would think he was overrated. But if you saw him play he is one of the most gifted passers of the ball ever. He had a bigger arm than Josh Allen

If you had doubts on Namath talent, look up what Lombardi and Walsh

said about him

  • Upvote 2
  • Post of the Week 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Green Ghost said:

I remember the game. It was so much fun to watch them both air it out that day. Johnny U was at the end of the road, but he woke up the echoes that day. 
It was like watching a great heavyweight fight with both going toe to toe. At the end Joe simply outlasted him, and the Jets won the game.

@T0mShane is right though, those two secondaries were out to lunch the entire day. Everything Joe and Johnny threw up there connected with a WR who was wide open.

Joe's six TDs averaged 33 yards

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, hmhertz said:

His most memorable moment in those four seasons came on September 24, 1972, when he and his boyhood idol Johnny Unitas combined for 872 passing yards in Baltimore. Namath threw for 496 yards and six touchdowns and Unitas 376 yards and three in a 44–34 New York victory over the Colts, its first against Baltimore since Super Bowl III. The game is considered by many NFL experts to be the finest display of passing in a single game in league history

I watched that game. Imagine, the jets had a deep threat te. Caster had a field day.

as for who had the best long ball, it’s Namath. Namath was just as much a magician with the ball as Mahomes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I laugh because so many of us out here did not see Namath and don’t realize how truly talented he was and when he played poorly he is this, see the difference..

NYT…..

https://www.nytimes.com/1978/01/26/archives/the-most-honest-quarterback-sports-of-the-times.html

Earlier in that 1968 season, five interceptions by the Denver Broncos deprived the Jets of an expected victory.

“I ain't sayin’ nothin',” he announced later at his locker, “except that I stink.”

With those few words, Joe Namath had dissected a 21 to 13 loss better than the game‐films would. Win or lose Joe Namath never hid behind that copout phrase that almost all coaches and many players use: “I won't know until I see the films.” Joe Namath always knew.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...