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DeAndre Hopkins Released


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5 hours ago, MichaelScott said:

Okay, my mistake. When they talk about 2 year deals for guys at that age, I usually just assume it gets structured as a one year guaranteed with kind of a 2nd year option. I didn't think he was getting fully guaranteed or anything close. If his contract is anything guaranteed past the 1st year, I would tend to agree with you. 

That being said (as you said, two different subjects), I am growing more concerned every day by the lack of moves on the O to build around the QB position. Last year I think our defense showed superbowl caliber. I don't think the O is remotely close to that and if we don't get some playmakers, even one's on the wrong side of 30, that offense is going to hold us back from making this Rodgers trade worth while. But like you said, two different things. 

They do have a lot riding on Garrett Wilson for sure. Lazard is a # 2 guy not more than that. If they could bring in a Hopkins type on a one year deal then hell go for it. The projection of two for 38mm scares me if that is a real 2nd year. Odell blew up the old WR market. Might have to pass on this one.

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32 minutes ago, Maxman said:

 

The two teams that are favorites to sign him have less cap space than we do and little to no ability to restructure, yet @Larz says we don't have the cap space. So, its not possible, I guess.. lol cap space is something we can make a lot of. Just you watch.

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2 hours ago, Jdeet said:

The two teams that are favorites to sign him have less cap space than we do and little to no ability to restructure, yet @Larz says we don't have the cap space. So, its not possible, I guess.. lol cap space is something we can make a lot of. Just you watch.

This isn't about cap space. It is about giving out bad contracts and the Jets are only doing that once (Rodgers). 

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4 hours ago, Maxman said:

This isn't about cap space. It is about giving out bad contracts and the Jets are only doing that once (Rodgers). 

Yeah, but at this point are you pot committed and have to take a swing. Wilson, Hopkins, Lazard, hardman is scary

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7 hours ago, Maxman said:

They do have a lot riding on Garrett Wilson for sure. Lazard is a # 2 guy not more than that. If they could bring in a Hopkins type on a one year deal then hell go for it. The projection of two for 38mm scares me if that is a real 2nd year. Odell blew up the old WR market. Might have to pass on this one.

I think they have way too much riding on Garrett Wilson. It's fine for him to be the centerpiece of your offense. He was so good in his first year with horrible QBs throwing him the ball. With a QB like Rodgers, I think his ceiling is possibly a top 5 WR in the league. But, it would certainly help if he wasn't the only WR needing the D's attention. You're also putting everything on the hope of him staying healthy. If he gets banged up for a chunk of games, relying on Corey Davis, Mims, and Cobb is insanity. Also, counting on Hall to be 100% 1 year removed from that injury is negligent, imo. 

And then there is the oline...😪🙄😬

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1 hour ago, MichaelScott said:

I think they have way too much riding on Garrett Wilson. It's fine for him to be the centerpiece of your offense. He was so good in his first year with horrible QBs throwing him the ball. With a QB like Rodgers, I think his ceiling is possibly a top 5 WR in the league. But, it would certainly help if he wasn't the only WR needing the D's attention. You're also putting everything on the hope of him staying healthy. If he gets banged up for a chunk of games, relying on Corey Davis, Mims, and Cobb is insanity. Also, counting on Hall to be 100% 1 year removed from that injury is negligent, imo. 

And then there is the oline...😪🙄😬

Which is why it was asinine for Joe D to pass on JSN.

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11 hours ago, Jdeet said:

The two teams that are favorites to sign him have less cap space than we do and little to no ability to restructure, yet @Larz says we don't have the cap space. So, it’s not possible, I guess.. lol cap space is something we can make a lot of. Just you watch.

Not the favorite, “people say “

Not we

80 has a great memory of what people post and @‘s them 
 

hmmm

 

call your “sources “ 80, and get the scoop.   No wishy washy guesses.  Plant the flag. Tell us what’s happening. I mean a guy with “sources “ doesn’t need to “just you watch “, right ?

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3 hours ago, Joe W. Namath said:

Which is why it was asinine for Joe D to pass on JSN.

We shall see in about three years time. It takes D linemen that long to break through. JD goes with his board, not as much with need. 

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10 hours ago, Maxman said:

This isn't about cap space. It is about giving out bad contracts and the Jets are only doing that once (Rodgers). 

I am pretty sure we are in the position to give him the best contract out of the three teams - Bills, Chiefs, Jets. I don’t think the contract will be as bad as you think. Unless you simply don’t want to sign him at all. Then any contract is bad, I guess. 

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1 hour ago, Larz said:

Not the favorite, “people say “

Not we

80 has a great memory of what people post and @‘s them 
 

hmmm

 

call your “sources “ 80, and get the scoop.   No wishy washy guesses.  Plant the flag. Tell us what’s happening. I mean a guy with “sources “ doesn’t need to “just you watch “, right ?

Huh?

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40 minutes ago, playtowinthegame said:

Hopkins will sign with the Chiefs. Book it. 

No way.  They already have Kelce.  They have enough to win with now, It would be a waste to have a second premier weapon.  I mean how many more wins would they have with him?

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27 minutes ago, FidelioJet said:

No way.  They already have Kelce.  They have enough to win with now, It would be a waste to have a second premier weapon.  I mean how many more wins would they have with him?

It would give KC a plethora of weapons with a multitude of ways to attack their opp on a weekly basis during the marathon that is the NFL season.

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On 5/26/2023 at 1:21 PM, T0mShane said:

Aaron Rodgers says some dumb sh*t about Covid and the entirety of sports media mocks his every utterance and prays he fails on the Jets. 
 

DeAndre Hopkins, who was effectively thrown out of Clemson and unceremoniously tossed off of two different NFL team in quick succession, gets cut and its “ooh let’s go live and debate whether the Chiefs or the Bills should sign him this afternoon.”

He said the truth about COVID and was proven right. He misled the media (not his teammates or the organization) about being "immunized". 

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5 minutes ago, VUJetsfan said:

He said the truth about COVID and was proven right. He misled the media (not his teammates or the organization) about being "immunized". 

Love it when the hotboys wait a few days to recover the password for their alts. 

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Inside DeAndre Hopkins’s Release, and Why He Had No Value to Teams

The former Cardinals and Texans receiver’s options might include taking less from either the Chiefs or Bills to continue his NFL career.

The DeAndre Hopkins situation is, first and foremost, a lesson in NFL economics. In the end, Arizona couldn’t get anything for the star receiver it made a blockbuster trade for three years ago—and that most certainly isn’t an indication that he can’t play anymore nor that he might not have value to another team.

It’s that he didn’t have value … at $19.45 million.

The Cardinals were never going to pay him that. Neither were the other 31 teams. So that left Arizona to put Hopkins on the trading block at the start of the offseason, and wait. And wait. And wait. The Cardinals gave other teams permission to talk to him and his representation (he technically doesn’t have an agent, but financial adviser Saint Omni speaks for him in negotiations). They kept taking cash off their asking price, and were even willing to buy a draft pick as part of it.

All that led to Friday’s release of Hopkins, putting the 11th-year receiver, who turns 31 in a week, on the market. My guess would be that the market bears something around half of what he would’ve made on his now terminated deal in 2023, with some incentives to get him closer to being whole. But at this juncture of the offseason, even getting there could be a challenge. Here’s a little more on what’s behind Hopkins, and potentially ahead for him, too.

• The Cardinals were giving any teams who wanted to talk to Hopkins permission to do so. Two teams that got such permission, the Chiefs and Bills, spoke to Hopkins and Omni, and those two were the only two that engaged Arizona in trade talks. So the interest in giving up a pick or two to get Hopkins was pretty tepid.

• Arizona’s initial asking price was a second-round pick and another asset, but by the end, it was willing to part with him for a lot less than that. And my sense is it’d have considered picking up a chunk of his salary (obviously the higher the pick, the more it might give) to get, say, a top-100 pick. But, again, there simply wasn’t interest in paying Hopkins top dollar and giving up a Day 2 draft pick for him.

• Hopkins’s camp tried to push Arizona to pick up more money, but there was nothing really compelling them to do so without a premium pick attached to the deal. This wasn’t like the Brandin Cooks or Allen Robinson trades, where the Texans and Rams, respectively, were dealing with guaranteed money, and picking some up meant getting to not pay the rest.

• Kansas City made progress toward a deal, but things went a little sideways when Odell Beckham Jr. got $15 million in base pay from Baltimore, making Hopkins feel like he should land at least that much, given that Beckham didn’t play last year. The Chiefs wound up giving free-agent left tackle Donovan Smith a deal structured similarly to the offer they made Hopkins, which will make it more difficult for Kansas City to circle back.

• The Bills, similarly, were willing to do a pay-for-play sort of deal loaded with incentives. My feeling is that it leaves them in the same place the Chiefs are with Hopkins—the only way it happens is if his price comes down.

And if you add all that up, I think we get one of two conclusions. Either Hopkins finds someone to pay up and takes the bag. Or, he takes less to chase a ring with Kansas City or Buffalo, with the idea that putting together a full, healthy 2023 could burnish his legacy and perhaps set up one last payday next March.

That said, there’s a healthy divide on exactly what Hopkins has left. I asked one veteran team executive what’s still there, and he answered, via text, “Not much. He can’t run anymore.” Another answer was pretty different—“He’s still a good player. Good route runner, big, physical target that can play a ball in the air. He’s still a threat.” And a third played both sides of it.“Still great hands, he is not going to separate, not much of a deep threat, but very strong, and makes contested catches as well as anyone in the NFL,” the AFC exec said. “Does not love to practice—I can’t imagine that’ll get any better. And when things don’t go well, you’re always gonna be leery, All right, what kind of drama are we gonna get from this guy? When things are great, he’s great. When things go south, his true colors show a little bit.

“But he always shows up on game day. He’s gonna have to go to a team that knows what they’re getting. You cannot expect a perfect-attendance type of worker.”

That’s why, to me, it’s imperative that Hopkins goes to a place that a) won’t be overly reliant on him (either as a player or in team leadership) and b) has a strong locker room that won’t be pulled the wrong way if things turn sour. Remember, there’s a chance Hopkins is just where Julio Jones was two years ago, when Jones was traded from Atlanta to Tennessee. And if that’s the case, the team trading for Hopkins probably will have buyer’s remorse. There, of course, is also the chance that a change of scenery could bring the old Hopkins back.What we know is by the end in Houston, Hopkins was banged up enough to where he barely practiced at all during the season—and that was three and a half years ago, and before he started missing time due to injury. While over his first eight NFL seasons, he played in 126 of 128 games (plus six of six playoff games), he’s missed 15 of 34 games (six due to a PED suspension) the past two years.

Generally, those trends don’t reverse themselves. Which is one reason why, exciting as the idea of acquiring Hopkins might sound for certain fan bases, interest has been very tepid from teams.

 >> https://www.si.com/nfl/2023/05/30/inside-deandre-hopkins-release-options-bills-chiefs

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13 minutes ago, jtomm said:

Inside DeAndre Hopkins’s Release, and Why He Had No Value to Teams

The former Cardinals and Texans receiver’s options might include taking less from either the Chiefs or Bills to continue his NFL career.

The DeAndre Hopkins situation is, first and foremost, a lesson in NFL economics. In the end, Arizona couldn’t get anything for the star receiver it made a blockbuster trade for three years ago—and that most certainly isn’t an indication that he can’t play anymore nor that he might not have value to another team.

It’s that he didn’t have value … at $19.45 million.

The Cardinals were never going to pay him that. Neither were the other 31 teams. So that left Arizona to put Hopkins on the trading block at the start of the offseason, and wait. And wait. And wait. The Cardinals gave other teams permission to talk to him and his representation (he technically doesn’t have an agent, but financial adviser Saint Omni speaks for him in negotiations). They kept taking cash off their asking price, and were even willing to buy a draft pick as part of it.

All that led to Friday’s release of Hopkins, putting the 11th-year receiver, who turns 31 in a week, on the market. My guess would be that the market bears something around half of what he would’ve made on his now terminated deal in 2023, with some incentives to get him closer to being whole. But at this juncture of the offseason, even getting there could be a challenge. Here’s a little more on what’s behind Hopkins, and potentially ahead for him, too.

• The Cardinals were giving any teams who wanted to talk to Hopkins permission to do so. Two teams that got such permission, the Chiefs and Bills, spoke to Hopkins and Omni, and those two were the only two that engaged Arizona in trade talks. So the interest in giving up a pick or two to get Hopkins was pretty tepid.

• Arizona’s initial asking price was a second-round pick and another asset, but by the end, it was willing to part with him for a lot less than that. And my sense is it’d have considered picking up a chunk of his salary (obviously the higher the pick, the more it might give) to get, say, a top-100 pick. But, again, there simply wasn’t interest in paying Hopkins top dollar and giving up a Day 2 draft pick for him.

• Hopkins’s camp tried to push Arizona to pick up more money, but there was nothing really compelling them to do so without a premium pick attached to the deal. This wasn’t like the Brandin Cooks or Allen Robinson trades, where the Texans and Rams, respectively, were dealing with guaranteed money, and picking some up meant getting to not pay the rest.

• Kansas City made progress toward a deal, but things went a little sideways when Odell Beckham Jr. got $15 million in base pay from Baltimore, making Hopkins feel like he should land at least that much, given that Beckham didn’t play last year. The Chiefs wound up giving free-agent left tackle Donovan Smith a deal structured similarly to the offer they made Hopkins, which will make it more difficult for Kansas City to circle back.

• The Bills, similarly, were willing to do a pay-for-play sort of deal loaded with incentives. My feeling is that it leaves them in the same place the Chiefs are with Hopkins—the only way it happens is if his price comes down.

And if you add all that up, I think we get one of two conclusions. Either Hopkins finds someone to pay up and takes the bag. Or, he takes less to chase a ring with Kansas City or Buffalo, with the idea that putting together a full, healthy 2023 could burnish his legacy and perhaps set up one last payday next March.

That said, there’s a healthy divide on exactly what Hopkins has left. I asked one veteran team executive what’s still there, and he answered, via text, “Not much. He can’t run anymore.” Another answer was pretty different—“He’s still a good player. Good route runner, big, physical target that can play a ball in the air. He’s still a threat.” And a third played both sides of it.“Still great hands, he is not going to separate, not much of a deep threat, but very strong, and makes contested catches as well as anyone in the NFL,” the AFC exec said. “Does not love to practice—I can’t imagine that’ll get any better. And when things don’t go well, you’re always gonna be leery, All right, what kind of drama are we gonna get from this guy? When things are great, he’s great. When things go south, his true colors show a little bit.

“But he always shows up on game day. He’s gonna have to go to a team that knows what they’re getting. You cannot expect a perfect-attendance type of worker.”

That’s why, to me, it’s imperative that Hopkins goes to a place that a) won’t be overly reliant on him (either as a player or in team leadership) and b) has a strong locker room that won’t be pulled the wrong way if things turn sour. Remember, there’s a chance Hopkins is just where Julio Jones was two years ago, when Jones was traded from Atlanta to Tennessee. And if that’s the case, the team trading for Hopkins probably will have buyer’s remorse. There, of course, is also the chance that a change of scenery could bring the old Hopkins back.What we know is by the end in Houston, Hopkins was banged up enough to where he barely practiced at all during the season—and that was three and a half years ago, and before he started missing time due to injury. While over his first eight NFL seasons, he played in 126 of 128 games (plus six of six playoff games), he’s missed 15 of 34 games (six due to a PED suspension) the past two years.

Generally, those trends don’t reverse themselves. Which is one reason why, exciting as the idea of acquiring Hopkins might sound for certain fan bases, interest has been very tepid from teams.

 >> https://www.si.com/nfl/2023/05/30/inside-deandre-hopkins-release-options-bills-chiefs

Hopkins won't officially be released until 4PM today.

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Inside DeAndre Hopkins’s Release, and Why He Had No Value to Teams

The former Cardinals and Texans receiver’s options might include taking less from either the Chiefs or Bills to continue his NFL career.

The DeAndre Hopkins situation is, first and foremost, a lesson in NFL economics. In the end, Arizona couldn’t get anything for the star receiver it made a blockbuster trade for three years ago—and that most certainly isn’t an indication that he can’t play anymore nor that he might not have value to another team.

It’s that he didn’t have value … at $19.45 million.

The Cardinals were never going to pay him that. Neither were the other 31 teams. So that left Arizona to put Hopkins on the trading block at the start of the offseason, and wait. And wait. And wait. The Cardinals gave other teams permission to talk to him and his representation (he technically doesn’t have an agent, but financial adviser Saint Omni speaks for him in negotiations). They kept taking cash off their asking price, and were even willing to buy a draft pick as part of it.

All that led to Friday’s release of Hopkins, putting the 11th-year receiver, who turns 31 in a week, on the market. My guess would be that the market bears something around half of what he would’ve made on his now terminated deal in 2023, with some incentives to get him closer to being whole. But at this juncture of the offseason, even getting there could be a challenge. Here’s a little more on what’s behind Hopkins, and potentially ahead for him, too.

• The Cardinals were giving any teams who wanted to talk to Hopkins permission to do so. Two teams that got such permission, the Chiefs and Bills, spoke to Hopkins and Omni, and those two were the only two that engaged Arizona in trade talks. So the interest in giving up a pick or two to get Hopkins was pretty tepid.

• Arizona’s initial asking price was a second-round pick and another asset, but by the end, it was willing to part with him for a lot less than that. And my sense is it’d have considered picking up a chunk of his salary (obviously the higher the pick, the more it might give) to get, say, a top-100 pick. But, again, there simply wasn’t interest in paying Hopkins top dollar and giving up a Day 2 draft pick for him.

• Hopkins’s camp tried to push Arizona to pick up more money, but there was nothing really compelling them to do so without a premium pick attached to the deal. This wasn’t like the Brandin Cooks or Allen Robinson trades, where the Texans and Rams, respectively, were dealing with guaranteed money, and picking some up meant getting to not pay the rest.

• Kansas City made progress toward a deal, but things went a little sideways when Odell Beckham Jr. got $15 million in base pay from Baltimore, making Hopkins feel like he should land at least that much, given that Beckham didn’t play last year. The Chiefs wound up giving free-agent left tackle Donovan Smith a deal structured similarly to the offer they made Hopkins, which will make it more difficult for Kansas City to circle back.

• The Bills, similarly, were willing to do a pay-for-play sort of deal loaded with incentives. My feeling is that it leaves them in the same place the Chiefs are with Hopkins—the only way it happens is if his price comes down.

And if you add all that up, I think we get one of two conclusions. Either Hopkins finds someone to pay up and takes the bag. Or, he takes less to chase a ring with Kansas City or Buffalo, with the idea that putting together a full, healthy 2023 could burnish his legacy and perhaps set up one last payday next March.

That said, there’s a healthy divide on exactly what Hopkins has left. I asked one veteran team executive what’s still there, and he answered, via text, “Not much. He can’t run anymore.” Another answer was pretty different—“He’s still a good player. Good route runner, big, physical target that can play a ball in the air. He’s still a threat.” And a third played both sides of it.“Still great hands, he is not going to separate, not much of a deep threat, but very strong, and makes contested catches as well as anyone in the NFL,” the AFC exec said. “Does not love to practice—I can’t imagine that’ll get any better. And when things don’t go well, you’re always gonna be leery, All right, what kind of drama are we gonna get from this guy? When things are great, he’s great. When things go south, his true colors show a little bit.

“But he always shows up on game day. He’s gonna have to go to a team that knows what they’re getting. You cannot expect a perfect-attendance type of worker.”

That’s why, to me, it’s imperative that Hopkins goes to a place that a) won’t be overly reliant on him (either as a player or in team leadership) and B) has a strong locker room that won’t be pulled the wrong way if things turn sour. Remember, there’s a chance Hopkins is just where Julio Jones was two years ago, when Jones was traded from Atlanta to Tennessee. And if that’s the case, the team trading for Hopkins probably will have buyer’s remorse. There, of course, is also the chance that a change of scenery could bring the old Hopkins back.What we know is by the end in Houston, Hopkins was banged up enough to where he barely practiced at all during the season—and that was three and a half years ago, and before he started missing time due to injury. While over his first eight NFL seasons, he played in 126 of 128 games (plus six of six playoff games), he’s missed 15 of 34 games (six due to a PED suspension) the past two years.

Generally, those trends don’t reverse themselves. Which is one reason why, exciting as the idea of acquiring Hopkins might sound for certain fan bases, interest has been very tepid from teams.

 >> https://www.si.com/nfl/2023/05/30/inside-deandre-hopkins-release-options-bills-chiefs

Give him a blank check!
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7 hours ago, Joe W. Namath said:

Which is why it was asinine for Joe D to pass on JSN.

JSN is not that good. Slow mid slot WR, with Wes Welker upside at best, more likely a 3rd down only possession WR. Not a 1st round talent. Sorry. 

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With Davis having a contract that’s easy to cut in 2 days… at least trying to get Hopkins makes sense for a win now team. Hopkins would likely get a deal paying him just a tad more than what Davis is due. And I’m sure we can make the deal with incentives bc his suspension and such. Probably around the 15mill area but guaranteed less than 10 or so.

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Mike Evans appears to have a lot more left in the tank, than Hopkins and is definitely a better character presence, which appears to be a big deal with the Jets.  A post June 1st cut or trade by the Bucs might be likely and personally think he would be a better fit for the Jets at this point and for similar $. There are others too, such as Chris Godwin, but personally like Evans better.  

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26 minutes ago, Bobby816 said:

With Davis having a contract that’s easy to cut in 2 days… at least trying to get Hopkins makes sense for a win now team. Hopkins would likely get a deal paying him just a tad more than what Davis is due. And I’m sure we can make the deal with incentives bc his suspension and such. Probably around the 15mill area but guaranteed less than 10 or so.

Rappaport citing the Michael Thomas deal was suggesting he would get something like a $10mm/year with incentives up to $15/year deal. Seems very realistic with a Davis trade or cut unless you're one of these guys who just needs moar cap space.

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16 minutes ago, Barry McCockinner said:

Rappaport citing the Michael Thomas deal was suggesting he would get something like a $10mm/year with incentives up to $15/year deal. Seems very realistic with a Davis trade or cut unless you're one of these guys who just needs moar cap space.

Very reasonable deal assuming you don't consider a PED suspension at age 30 to be a red flag (some might?).

I'd personally be all in, but I'm not holding my breath. We weren't on his short list and I have to think that some of the teams that were  on it will make a move for him. 

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22 minutes ago, slimjasi said:

Very reasonable deal assuming you don't consider a PED suspension at age 30 to be a red flag (some might?).

I'd personally be all in, but I'm not holding my breath. We weren't on his short list and I have to think that some of the teams that were  on it will make a move for him. 

Perfectly reasonable to be concerned about the suspension and age but keep in mind we're comparing to the production of Corey Davis here. Hopkins in all of his crusty old 30 year old PED body still outperformed Garrett Wilson on a per game basis last year.

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4 hours ago, #27TheDominator said:

Exactly.  Except when he was #1 in 2022 and #2 in 2021 and 2019.  

#1 on the depth chart on a team with zero veteran WR talent doesn’t make you a #1. You are actually proving my point btw. He was 1 on last years depth chart and had less than 800 yards. With Rodgers as his QB. That’s effing terrible. 

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