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What’s the recovery timeline for an Achilles tear?


C Mart

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Achilles Tear Info:

What is the Achilles? What happens when it’s ruptured?

The Achilles tendon connects the muscles in the calf to the heel bone. When you grab just above your ankle and squeeze the back of your leg, you can feel the Achilles. It’s very strong (fibrous), so tears/ruptures are more rare than something like tendonitis. The strength of the tendon is why experts look for the “ripple” effect in diagnosing these injuries on film. For a rupture to occur, there has to be a powerful, often sudden, overstretching force.

Steps in the recovery process

In the first few weeks post-rupture, it’s basically immobilization and then setting up a recovery plan. Ruptures can be treated with either surgery or by using a cast or splint. For athletes, surgery is generally preferred because it lowers the risk of re-injury. However, there are other complications that can arise post-surgery, such as infection or not giving the area enough time to heal after surgery, that non-surgical options don’t have.

After surgery, the recovering area is immobilized again for around two weeks until some range of motion (ROM) exercises are introduced that mainly involve moving the foot around. If there is pain in those exercises, it’s considered a setback and the exercises should be stopped immediately. Around the five-week mark, foot ROM exercises continue (which must be pain-free) with some stretching. For an athlete, this could be in a pool because of reduced impact and load. At this point, the ability to bear weight should be tested as well.

Around the two-month mark, the cast or boot should be used less and less frequently. Balance will be tested, ROM exercises continue to ramp up and walking mechanics should be tested as well. Around the three-month mark, Rodgers — if he follows this path — should be able to complete some simple exercises like calf raises.

Rodgers could return to some football activities at the four-month mark. First, though, his gait needs to look correct, his ROM should be close to where it was pre-injury (although it doesn’t have to be 100 percent) and there should be no pain throughout this process. He could start jumping (more of a hop) and jogging. This process continues to ramp up and workouts become more tailored to his position. If all goes well, this could be completed in around six months. Given Rodgers’ age, however, this might not be the most likely scenario, but it’s worth acknowledging as a possibility.

Rodgers and Dobbins’ recovery could vary

According to the Cleveland Clinic, full healing of a torn Achilles tendon takes about four to six months, with longer timelines to be able to safely perform high-impact activities like running and jumping. That estimate is for average civilians and not professional athletes who need their bodies to perform at an extremely high level on a daily basis.

Quarterbacks and Achilles injuries

Rodgers doesn’t need the explosive lower half that a running back might need, but this is still a significant injury. Throws, escaping pressure, scrambling for first downs — all these require a strong and flexible lower half.

What’s working against Rodgers?

Rodgers’ age is big here. Older athletes tend to have longer recovery times because as we age, our blood flow and elasticity decrease ever so slightly. This means that he might need an extra week or month. In other words, things might need to be more gradual.

 

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8 minutes ago, C Mart said:

If all goes well, this could be completed in around six months. Given Rodgers’ age, however, this might not be the most likely scenario, but it’s worth acknowledging as a possibility.

This is encouraging. 

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6 minutes ago, nj meadowlands said:

I've heard clips from Marino and Testaverde where they insist he can do it.  Marino noted that medical science and rehab processes are far advanced from when he tore his in his early 30's.  Vinny noted that because the injury was to Rodgers' left Achilles, it won't impact his ability to drive off his back foot and step into throws.

Both really good points! Remaining hopeful Rodgers comes back at full strength next year and we have (hopefully) an even better OL (not blaming them for the injury....just saying they are the weak unit on our team).

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21 minutes ago, C Mart said:

What’s notable about that injury and Rodgers’ tear is that both players had calf issues leading up to the injury. Rodgers missed time in June with a calf strain. Calf strains don’t always serve as a precursor to Achilles ruptures, but they can contribute. Any sort of inflammation or minor tears in the calf muscles put more pressure on the Achilles. Even if it’s not much, it can be enough to weaken the Achilles. This is why during calf strain recovery it is very important to follow a strict recovery plan that avoids putting undue pressure and stress on surrounding structures.

Ehh...

This doesn't sounds good as far as the Jets' medical staff with the possibility that they didn't treat Rodgers' calf strain seriously enough.

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1 minute ago, Beerfish said:

To be totally honest I am more concerned about how he looked in those two cut block plays where he looked very un Aaron Rodgers like.  He looked nothing like the decisive, hof QB that knows exactly  what he wants to do.

Fair concern. It could very well have just been first game with a new team in a new stadium jitters. I'm sure he wanted that first pass to go well.

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Dr. David Chao “Guarantees” Aaron Rodgers' Will Return on Pat McAfee Show

While everyone will rush to blame the infamous MetLife turf, here are the three likely causes in order of magnitude:

  1. Added Body Weight: The most likely cause of the Achilles tendon rupture was the added body weight from Bills linebacker Leonard Floyd as he attempted to get Rodgers on the ground for the sack. That extra weight caused an eccentric load on Rodgers’ left leg as he planted to try and get away and caused his Achilles to rupture under the added pressure.
  2. Previous Left Calf Strain: Rodgers had a left calf strain during preseason in mid-August and likely had some remaining weakness. He was not listed on the injury report leading up to the game, but that doesn’t mean his calf was at 100% strength.
  3. Cleats and Turf: In general, grass fields are safer than turf. That being said, the turf is not solely to blame for Rodgers’ Achilles tear. It was a factor, but not the only or most likely factor.
  4. Age: At 39, age likely played a role in the injury but given the situation the Achilles tear would have happened to a younger quarterback as well. The good news is the recovery is reliable regardless of age and Rodgers will have an opportunity to play next season, if he chooses to.

https://sicscore.com/nfl/updates/dr-david-chao-breaks-down-aaron-rodgers-injury-on-pat-mcafee-show

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Let me tell you something, don’t listen to the doom and gloomeds. He can absolutely do it and be ready for training camp.  The advancements in this have been tremendous just in the last 5 years.  For guys that need the quickness and agility a lot more than a qb, they have come back in under a year.

I am a big nova hoops fan and just in 22/23, their stud guard came back in 10 months. Yes he’s 22 years old but people were claiming it would be double that.  He came in and after a week of rust , he was arguably a top 3 player in the big east in February/March 

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12 minutes ago, AlexVanDyke said:

Let me tell you something, don’t listen to the doom and gloomeds. He can absolutely do it and be ready for training camp.  The advancements in this have been tremendous just in the last 5 years.  For guys that need the quickness and agility a lot more than a qb, they have come back in under a year.

I am a big nova hoops fan and just in 22/23, their stud guard came back in 10 months. Yes he’s 22 years old but people were claiming it would be double that.  He came in and after a week of rust , he was arguably a top 3 player in the big east in February/March 

10 months?  The article says 6 months...Add another 2 months to play it safe

Rodgers could return to some football activities at the four-month mark. First, though, his gait needs to look correct, his ROM should be close to where it was pre-injury (although it doesn’t have to be 100 percent) and there should be no pain throughout this process. He could start jumping (more of a hop) and jogging. This process continues to ramp up and workouts become more tailored to his position. If all goes well, this could be completed in around six months. Given Rodgers’ age, however, this might not be the most likely scenario, but it’s worth acknowledging as a possibility.

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2 minutes ago, C Mart said:

10 months?  The article says 6 months...Add another 2 months to play it safe

Rodgers could return to some football activities at the four-month mark. First, though, his gait needs to look correct, his ROM should be close to where it was pre-injury (although it doesn’t have to be 100 percent) and there should be no pain throughout this process. He could start jumping (more of a hop) and jogging. This process continues to ramp up and workouts become more tailored to his position. If all goes well, this could be completed in around six months. Given Rodgers’ age, however, this might not be the most likely scenario, but it’s worth acknowledging as a possibility.

I don’t know, I’m listening to haters on espn and they are saying 18 months.  They keep pointing to Durant and talking about guys from 15 plus years ago 

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I've done it. He will be 2-3 months no weight on it. Couple months in a boot. Then rehab. He will walk on it and jog by 6 months. He will look normal by a year. He won't be strong in his push off and mobility for another year. Realistically he can be back for the start of 2024. He might look the same, but he won't feel the same and his performance from a personal standpoint will be off as well. 2 years to be normal normal. 

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51 minutes ago, nj meadowlands said:

I've heard clips from Marino and Testaverde where they insist he can do it.  Marino noted that medical science and rehab processes are far advanced from when he tore his in his early 30's.  Vinny noted that because the injury was to Rodgers' left Achilles, it won't impact his ability to drive off his back foot and step into throws.

All very encouraging and I know this has absolutely nothing to do with it but with this teams luck history, I still need to understand why vinnie of all people on all nights being honorary captain

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I guess I’m the only one but I don’t want him back. Not even for the vet minimum.

It was fun for a minute but he’s done.

Had a huge dropoff in play in 2022, due to both age and injury, and tore his Achilles on a basic scramble four plays into the 2023 season. The odds of him staying healthy and playing at a high level as a 40-41 year old in 2024 are slim to none. 

The Jets should be looking at free agents and college prospects for the next QB. 

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1 minute ago, pointman said:

I've done it. He will be 2-3 months no weight on it. Couple months in a boot. Then rehab. He will walk on it and jog by 6 months. He will look normal by a year. He won't be strong in his push off and mobility for another year. Realistically he can be back for the start of 2024. He might look the same, but he won't feel the same and his performance from a personal standpoint will be off as well. 2 years to be normal normal. 

Not discounting any of yours & the body healing requirements...However, did you have 24/7 training & rehab resources?  Rodgers will, if he wants it...

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Just now, C Mart said:

Not discounting any of yours & the body healing requirements...However, did you have 24/7 training & rehab resources?  Rodgers will, if he wants it...

I got it done at a top facility. I was fortunate in that regard. I am sure AARon has better but the reality is, healing is healing and the rehab on this isn't going to get accelerate by many factors if any at all. Its just about time. Its baby work for him or just about anyone. I won't be surprised when we see him standing on the sidelines in a couple of months or him jogging soon after that. But he won't be his usual self for a long while

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1 hour ago, Adoni Beast said:

Both really good points! Remaining hopeful Rodgers comes back at full strength next year and we have (hopefully) an even better OL (not blaming them for the injury....just saying they are the weak unit on our team).

upgrading the oline HAS T O BE the number 1 priority this offseason and maybe even at the trade deadline

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1 hour ago, C Mart said:

What’s the recovery timeline for an Achilles tear? 

Sep 12, 2023

What is the Achilles? What happens when it’s ruptured?

The Achilles tendon connects the muscles in the calf to the heel bone. When you grab just above your ankle and squeeze the back of your leg, you can feel the Achilles. It’s very strong (fibrous), so tears/ruptures are more rare than something like tendonitis. The strength of the tendon is why experts look for the “ripple” effect in diagnosing these injuries on film. For a rupture to occur, there has to be a powerful, often sudden, overstretching force.

Steps in the recovery process

In the first few weeks post-rupture, it’s basically immobilization and then setting up a recovery plan. Ruptures can be treated with either surgery or by using a cast or splint. For athletes, surgery is generally preferred because it lowers the risk of re-injury. However, there are other complications that can arise post-surgery, such as infection or not giving the area enough time to heal after surgery, that non-surgical options don’t have.

After surgery, the recovering area is immobilized again for around two weeks until some range of motion (ROM) exercises are introduced that mainly involve moving the foot around. If there is pain in those exercises, it’s considered a setback and the exercises should be stopped immediately. Around the five-week mark, foot ROM exercises continue (which must be pain-free) with some stretching. For an athlete, this could be in a pool because of reduced impact and load. At this point, the ability to bear weight should be tested as well.

Around the two-month mark, the cast or boot should be used less and less frequently. Balance will be tested, ROM exercises continue to ramp up and walking mechanics should be tested as well. Around the three-month mark, Rodgers — if he follows this path — should be able to complete some simple exercises like calf raises.

Rodgers could return to some football activities at the four-month mark. First, though, his gait needs to look correct, his ROM should be close to where it was pre-injury (although it doesn’t have to be 100 percent) and there should be no pain throughout this process. He could start jumping (more of a hop) and jogging. This process continues to ramp up and workouts become more tailored to his position. If all goes well, this could be completed in around six months. Given Rodgers’ age, however, this might not be the most likely scenario, but it’s worth acknowledging as a possibility.

Rodgers and Dobbins’ recovery could vary

According to the Cleveland Clinic, full healing of a torn Achilles tendon takes about four to six months, with longer timelines to be able to safely perform high-impact activities like running and jumping. That estimate is for average civilians and not professional athletes who need their bodies to perform at an extremely high level on a daily basis.

Quarterbacks and Achilles injuries

Rodgers doesn’t need the explosive lower half that a running back might need, but this is still a significant injury. Throws, escaping pressure, scrambling for first downs — all these require a strong and flexible lower half.

What’s working against Rodgers?

Rodgers’ age is big here. Older athletes tend to have longer recovery times because as we age, our blood flow and elasticity decrease ever so slightly. This means that he might need an extra week or month. In other words, things might need to be more gradual.

 

I tore mine around age 58 and had it repaired.  I was walking at 3 months and doing my usual activities including fishing and exercising by 6 months.  I think his course should be similar.  Its a sh*tty injury but as opposed to some injuries, he needs to get it fixed regardless.

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What’s another 2 years to reach the promised land? 
 

Tv Land Reaction GIF by #Impastor
 

but seriously I think there is little doubt that he’s going to try to come back. It will be interesting to see how much time he spends at the facility. Normally rehabbing players do it from home so to speak. 

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