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NFL teams with offensive-minded head coaches are more likely to succeed (WaPo)


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The Washington Post

NFL teams with offensive-minded head coaches are more likely to succeed
Story by Neil Greenberg  • 
19h

Washington Commanders head coach Ron Rivera fired defensive coordinator Jack Del Rio and defensive backs coach Brent Vieselmeyer after the team gave up 431 yards and 45 points in a loss to the Dallas Cowboys on Thanksgiving Day, but that doesn’t figure to be the end of the changes in Ashburn. There is wide speculation that Commanders owner Josh Harris will keep Rivera through the end of this season but no further, which would open the door for a new face to help revitalize the franchise.

If so, that won’t be the NFL’s only opening. The Raiders and Panthers already fired their head coaches, and more teams are sure to follow. Washington Post contributor Jason La Canfora posited recently that the downtrend of offenses across the league could lead to defensive-minded coaches dominating the next NFL hiring cycle. Perhaps, but that would be a mistake, because offensive-minded coaches have outperformed their defensive counterparts since 2002, when the league expanded to 32 teams.

There are many ways to evaluate success in the NFL; the primary metric we will use here is expected points added, the number of points scored above or below what we would expect after accounting for the down, distance and field position of each play. The top teams in net expected points added this season include the Dallas Cowboys, San Francisco 49ers and Baltimore Ravens, all on the shortlist of Super Bowl contenders. The bottom three teams are the Arizona Cardinals, Carolina Panthers and New York Giants, poor performers whose inclusion here suggests that this metric passes the eye test.

Before moving forward we should stipulate that offensive performance is now more important than defensive performance and the adage “defense wins championships” does not have as much merit as it did in the past. From 2002 to 2006, the average offensive expected points added rank for a team appearing in the Super Bowl was 11th, while the average defensive rank was 10th. By 2018 to 2022, those had shifted to fifth and 11th, respectively. The past seven Super Bowl winners were ranked no lower than seventh in offensive expected points added, while three of the seven had defenses that ranked 11th or worse. In other words, offensive powerhouses are taking over the championship landscape.

Now that we’ve established that proficient offenses are most important for championship contenders in the modern game, we can dive into how much better offensive-minded head coaches have been for their teams.

Over the past 20 full seasons, 53 percent of the head coaches in the NFL had prior experience on the offensive side of the game, including offensive coordinators, quarterbacks coaches and so on. Teams coached by those offensive-minded head coaches have accounted for 61 percent of the top five offenses in the NFL over that span. In other words, they have been responsible for more than their fair share of stellar team performances. They also have been at the helm for 55 percent of the top five defensive performances; again, more than their fair share. That means, of course, that defensive-minded coaches have accounted for less than their share of top five offensive and defensive performances.

If you were to select a team playing from 2002 to 2022 at random and that team ranked in the top five for both offense and defense, there would be a 34 percent chance that team appeared in the Super Bowl that season. If the team you selected was top five in offense and average in defense, the chance drops to 14 percent. Select a team with an average offense and a top five defense and the odds slip even further, to eight percent. Teams that didn’t rank in the top five in either category had less than a one percent chance of participating in a Super Bowl.

It’s not just Super Bowls, either. Offensive-minded head coaches have won 51 percent of their games since 2002, while defensive-minded head coaches have won just 48 percent. Over each of the past three seasons, coaches plucked from the offensive side of the ball have outperformed their defensive counterparts in regular season win rate. Coaches with offensive backgrounds have been more successful in the playoffs, too, winning 51 percent of their postseason games since 2002, compared to 49 percent for coaches from the other side of the ball. If you remove Bill Belichick (with six Super Bowls and a 31-13 playoff record) from the ranks of defensive-minded coaches, the combined playoff win rate for that group drops to 44 percent.

The good news for Washington fans is there remain some promising offensive candidates, including Detroit Lions offensive coordinator Ben Johnson. Johnson teamed with Coach Dan Campbell to assume play-calling responsibilities after Detroit’s 0-8 start in 2021, and the Lions’ offense took off. He was named offensive coordinator in 2022, and this season the Lions’ offense has been one of the league’s most efficient, scoring 2.6 more points than expected per game, the seventh-highest mark.

The recent success of young offensive-minded head coaches such as Sean McVay (Los Angeles Rams), Kyle Shanahan (San Francisco 49ers) and Zac Taylor (Cincinnati Bengals) has created a sense that offensive innovation can lead to a quick turnaround, and front offices have taken notice. Three of the five coaching hires in 2023 hailed from the offensive ranks, and six of the 10 hires in 2022 were also offensive-minded coaches. There’s no reason for the pendulum to swing back. The numbers indicate that teams should continue to prioritize offensive backgrounds when making head coaching decisions.
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I feel like some of you are just dedicated to doing the same thing over and over again, hoping for different results.

Rookie D-Co Coaches drafting rookie QB's is the single least likely route to NFL title success.

Why wouldn't you all want to pursue the most likely routes?  Experienced coaches, Offensive coaches, Coaches with a history of QB success.

We don't get bonus points trying to be the exception to the rule.

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1 minute ago, Warfish said:

I feel like some of you are just dedicated to doing the same thing over and over again, hoping for different results.

Rookie D-Co Coaches drafting rookie QB's is the single least likely route to NFL title success.

Why wouldn't you all want to pursue the most likely routes?  Experienced coaches, Offensive coaches, Coaches with a history of QB success.

We don't get bonus points trying to be the exception to the rule.

I'd love an experienced HC.   The #1 reason, his ability to bring in a quality staff.

The best thing McVay did was bring in Wade Phillips to run his D.  "Run the defense, and I will stay out of your way"

But Jets fans didn't want Andy Reid.  "He can't win the big one"

Jets fans didn't want McCarthy, "Yeah, he got one SB, but so what?"   Same with Pederson.

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16 minutes ago, chirorob said:

DeMeco Ryans on the Texans seems to be bringing along a young QB, and he was a DC.

 

12 minutes ago, Zachtomims47 said:

NFL teams with a QB are more likely to succeed. 


Yup.  Greatness (or even top 2/3 tier QBs) can only be delayed, not denied.  Doesn’t much matter who the HC is you have a QB that checks all/most of the boxes you need.

It’s high time people stop putting circumstances above QB traits.  The data doesn’t support it, nor do the economics.  

QBs need to have what it takes and demonstrate it through a lot of experience at the HS and college levels, long before an NFL HC/OC gets his hands on him.  

Pro coaches don’t have tons of time available to work on QB fundamentals or create playbooks specifically designed to cover a QBs major flaws.  A young QB needs to be at least somewhat ready to go right out of the box, or else you don’t draft kids like that high.

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1 minute ago, chirorob said:

I'd love an experienced HC.   The #1 reason, his ability to bring in a quality staff.

The best thing McVay did was bring in Wade Phillips to run his D.  "Run the defense, and I will stay out of your way"

But Jets fans didn't want Andy Reid.  "He can't win the big one"

Jets fans didn't want McCarthy, "Yeah, he got one SB, but so what?"   Same with Pederson.

I did want Andy Reid but was against Mike McCarthy (who I thought only benefited from having a great QB.  Sort of like Nate Hackett as an OC).

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Just now, Warfish said:

I feel like some of you are just dedicated to doing the same thing over and over again, hoping for different results.

Rookie D-Co Coaches drafting rookie QB's is the single least likely route to NFL title success.

Why wouldn't you all want to pursue the most likely routes?  Experienced coaches, Offensive coaches, Coaches with a history of QB success.

We don't get bonus points trying to be the exception to the rule.

That’s fine. But this article does nothing for me. Just throwing in Zac Taylor’s record and calling him an offensive genius is lazy. He’s 4-28 without Burrow. He sucked and got the first pick and landed Burrow. 

If you think a new O HC will do better finding a franchise QB outside of the number 1 overall pick, then sure.  IMO it’s still a crap shoot. 

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The problem with defensive head coaches is:

  • They absolutely need to hire a great OC (not easy to do obviously)
  • Most of the good OCs become OCs very quickly
  • Look at Buffalo, ever since Daboll left the team hasn't been the same

Hire an offensive-minded head coach. Yes the HC is supposed to oversee the entire team, but I'd rather my HC be an expert in the portion of the game that the rules lean favoritism to.

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I get the idea, but I just don't see this as the issue with this team.  They were heaving the ball plenty until Zach showed he sucked.  Last year they threw a ton with Flacco and White.  I don't see this team as Rex trying to win games 12-9, except that I think they had to.   For all his faults, I generally like LaFleur's O.  At least when Mike White was operating it. 

This year is a different story.  I am not a huge Hackett fan, but obviously things would be different with Rodgers.  I don't give them a mulligan for Rodgers getting hurt, but I also don't think they would be telling Rodgers that he had to run and throw dump offs to the back and trying to keep overall point totals for games under 35.  I think it is silly to act like they are defense only and don't want to play modern NFL football.  

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13 minutes ago, Warfish said:

I feel like some of you are just dedicated to doing the same thing over and over again, hoping for different results.

Rookie D-Co Coaches drafting rookie QB's is the single least likely route to NFL title success.

Why wouldn't you all want to pursue the most likely routes?  Experienced coaches, Offensive coaches, Coaches with a history of QB success.

We don't get bonus points trying to be the exception to the rule.

The “same thing” we keep doing that is the far larger issue is over-drafting highly flawed QB prospects and handing them the unquestioned QB1 job for 3 years.  

Kyle Shanahan couldn’t “develop” Trey Lance and nor would he have done that with Zach.  Because “developing” a QB at fundamental levels isn’t really the job of an offense-minded NFL HC.  He can take a QB who already has the baseline skills necessary and help him perform a level or 2 higher but he CANNOT take dogsh*t QBs and work miracles.  

MLF was a fine OC.  Zach just sucked.  Sh*tty young QBs get OCs fired much, much more often than young QBs are “ruined” by coaching (if that ever really happens at all).

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I'm all about hiring an experienced offensive head coach - I pounded the table for McCarthy when we hired Gase and then pounded the table again for Pederson when we hired Saleh. 

I will say, however, that the differences outlined in the article don't seem particularly stark to me and I do wonder if these differences are statistically significant at all (also, you really need to control for a number of covariates, like lifetime QB performance). My honest guess is that the single best predictor of success are the QBs you draft, sign, or trade for. 

Still, all things being equal, I'd prefer an offensive coach. 

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I agree I'd rather have an offensive minded HC but the issue is that there's not enough quality candidates to go around......

We've seen DCs be very successful as head coaches......IMO the issue is ideology. Coaches who coach not to lose, get egotistical about their defense, and try to win games 13-10 aren't as successful as the coaches who understand this is an offensive league, you have to end possessions in TDs and use your defense to protect a lead as opposed to making them play lights out and score off turnovers every game.

 

Also I'd assume having a franchise QB is also a major factor for success as a coach.....just a hunch 🤷‍♂️

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10 minutes ago, slimjasi said:

I pounded the table for McCarthy when we hired Gase

You and me both.

10 minutes ago, slimjasi said:

I will say, however, that the differences outlined in the article don't seem particularly stark to me and I do wonder if these differences are statistically significant at all (also, you really need to control for a number of covariates, like lifetime QB performance). My honest guess is that the single best predictor of success are the QBs you draft, sign, or trade for. 

Still, all things being equal, I'd prefer an offensive coach. 

I think it's not picking the "wrong" guy per se, but again, rookie D-Co Head Coaches drafting rookie QB's is a route to QB (and team) failure in the vast majority of cases.  

Call me silly, I just think it's time to go a different route, to stop our endless (it seems) love of D-Co Head Coaches trying to be the Steel Curtain of the 2020's and trying to win every game 3-0, and maybe go for an Offense instead in the most Offense-friendly era of pro football, an era where Offense wins titles over and over.  /shrug.  

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26 minutes ago, Warfish said:

Experienced coaches, Offensive coaches, Coaches with a history of QB success.

I'm with you but these guys don't grow on trees, the amount of quality candidates on the offensive side of the ball are limited, and we have an owner that doesn't pony up for top talent who also has an archetype for his HC hires(DCs who are seeking their 1st HC job and won't cost a lot of $$)

For example: who's the experienced offensive mind that's gonna be a hot commodity this hiring cycle? For all the love Ben Johnson is getting, he would be a 1st time HC and its not a slam dunk he excels in that role. We've seen many scheme gurus fail when they take the big chair. There's no Payton or McCarthy this cycle unless someone lures Harbaugh from Michigan with a lucrative contract and roster control.......

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2 minutes ago, Warfish said:

You and me both.

I think it's not picking the "wrong" guy per se, but again, rookie D-Co Head Coaches drafting rookie QB's is a route to QB (and team) failure in the vast majority of cases.  

Call me silly, I just think it's time to go a different route, to stop our endless (it seems) love of D-Co Head Coaches trying to be the Steel Curtain of the 2020's and trying to win every game 3-0, and maybe go for an Offense instead in the most Offense-friendly era of pro football, an era where Offense wins titles over and over.  /shrug.  

I'm with you. I'm tired of the first time defensive head coaches. A lot of them have been very similar and have similar warts. 

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4 minutes ago, carlito1171 said:

I'm with you but these guys don't grow on trees, the amount of quality candidates on the offensive side of the ball are limited, and we have an owner that doesn't pony up for top talent who also has an archetype for his HC hires(DCs who are seeking their 1st HC job and won't cost a lot of $$)

For example: who's the experienced offensive mind that's gonna be a hot commodity this hiring cycle? For all the love Ben Johnson is getting, he would be a 1st time HC and its not a slam dunk he excels in that role. We've seen many scheme gurus fail when they take the big chair. There's no Payton or McCarthy this cycle unless someone lures Harbaugh from Michigan with a lucrative contract and roster control.......

Harbaugh (who was a Special Teams Coach pre-HC in the NFL, but has a record of success as an NFL HC and got a pretty crappy QB to lead them to a Super Bowl) would be the clear "big name/experienced guy" this cycle.

I'll be honest, I haven't checked out who the hot O-Co/Offensive guys are, because I don't think there is any chance we fire Saleh.  We're running it back.  No point getting all stiff over some guy only to watch him go elsewhere because we love repeating our failures over and over, lol.

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7 minutes ago, Warfish said:

Harbaugh (who was a Special Teams Coach pre-HC in the NFL, but has a record of success as an NFL HC and got a pretty crappy QB to lead them to a Super Bowl) would be the clear "big name/experienced guy" this cycle.

I'll be honest, I haven't checked out who the hot O-Co/Offensive guys are, because I don't think there is any chance we fire Saleh.  We're running it back.  No point getting all stiff over some guy only to watch him go elsewhere because we love repeating our failures over and over, lol.

Which Harbaugh is going to be the big name this cycle?  John was a special teams coach, but I don't think the Ravens are moving on.  Jim was a fairly high level QB in the NFL, but he didn't coach specials.  He was an offensive assistant for his dad at Western Kentucky and then a QB coach for Bill Callahan with the Raiders.  After that it has been nothing but head jobs.  Is his leaving Michigan a thing?  Again?

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3 minutes ago, Warfish said:

I'll be honest, I haven't checked out who the hot O-Co/Offensive guys are, because I don't think there is any chance we fire Saleh.  We're running it back.  No point getting all stiff over some guy only to watch him go elsewhere because we love repeating our failures over and over, lol.

Yea, understood lol.........there's a <1% chance Saleh is gone for reasons we've discussed ad nauseum...

Outside of Ben Johnson the Lions OC (who I do like) there isn't much out there in the offensive talent pool....no one with a ton of experience. Even the retread candidates are mostly from the defensive side of the ball

For convo sake I'd be intrigued by Raheem Morris, Rams DC, one of the few out there with extensive experience on both sides of the ball, and HC and Interim HC experience......his time in Tampa had more lows then highs(Was a 30 year old HC before it was popular) but I think he's learned a ton since then from some great coaches (Mike and Kyle Shanahan, Gruden, Dan Quinn, McVay) and would do well in his next stint. Also has a ton of connections in the league and would build a great staff (a key component of success IMO) 

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54 minutes ago, Jetsfan80 said:

 


Yup.  Greatness (or even top 2/3 tier QBs) can only be delayed, not denied.  Doesn’t much matter who the HC is you have a QB that checks all/most of the boxes you need.

It’s high time people stop putting circumstances above QB traits.  The data doesn’t support it, nor do the economics.  

QBs need to have what it takes and demonstrate it through a lot of experience at the HS and college levels, long before an NFL HC/OC gets his hands on him.  

Pro coaches don’t have tons of time available to work on QB fundamentals or create playbooks specifically designed to cover a QBs major flaws.  A young QB needs to be at least somewhat ready to go right out of the box, or else you don’t draft kids like that high.

+1

We've seen franchise QB's carry mid to terrible HCs.......finding that guy should be the priority until he's found. 

Our problem is that we haven't had a clue how to evaluate the position since Namath and we wonder why every coach flames out lol

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32 minutes ago, Warfish said:

I feel like some of you are just dedicated to doing the same thing over and over again, hoping for different results.

Rookie D-Co Coaches drafting rookie QB's is the single least likely route to NFL title success.

Why wouldn't you all want to pursue the most likely routes?  Experienced coaches, Offensive coaches, Coaches with a history of QB success.

We don't get bonus points trying to be the exception to the rule.

Granted any individual is different & there are surely plenty of successes if I really cared to look back at every example, but if going with the odds, this would seem a pretty innocuous statement.

Rookie HC who was a DC? OK, but not with a rookie QB. That combo should be from a former OC, if not one who had some experience as a QBC or passing coordinator before that, who'd also previously worked with a rookie or very inexperienced QB (successfully) if that's an option.

Otherwise? It's not quite the blind leading the blind, but the more papercuts you have go along with that (coming out of school early or after a limited number of starts, and/or limited action against defenses that were challenging & caused pressure, etc.), and then affording the rookie no time to sit... all of it together would seem to put the odds higher & higher that the endeavor is going to be unsuccessful. Yet it seems to be our preferred course of action for some unknown reason.

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This season has been a total disaster but one of the greatest QBs to play the game decided to come to a disaster of an organization in part because of Robert Saleh. This is just an observation and not an endorsement. Being saddled with historically bad QB play makes it harder to truly evaluate a HC. 

 

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14 minutes ago, carlito1171 said:

+1

We've seen franchise QB's carry mid to terrible HCs.......finding that guy should be the priority until he's found. 

Our problem is that we haven't had a clue how to evaluate the position since Namath and we wonder why every coach flames out lol

we don't hire coaches who can evalute the position, acting like its a GM job to solely evaluate QB's is really bad logic. The OC's need to make their system work with the QB's strengths, expecting a GM to just find a great QB is like asking your poor uncle to go hit the lottery

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1 hour ago, Warfish said:

I feel like some of you are just dedicated to doing the same thing over and over again, hoping for different results.

Rookie D-Co Coaches drafting rookie QB's is the single least likely route to NFL title success.

Why wouldn't you all want to pursue the most likely routes?  Experienced coaches, Offensive coaches, Coaches with a history of QB success.

We don't get bonus points trying to be the exception to the rule.

Im convinced Jets fans think finding a QB is like hitting the lottery. Its a foolish thought process. Good coaches find good QB's, sure, occasionally you can get really lucky, but sitting around waiting for luck is a losers mentaltiy. Get good coaches in here and our QB problems will be solved. Keep doing the same stupid sh*t and hoping to get lucky, and we will stay in this awful cycle

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1 minute ago, Flea Flicking Frank said:

we don't hire coaches who can evalute the position, acting like its a GM job to solely evaluate QB's is really bad logic. The OC's need to make their system work with the QB's strengths, expecting a GM to just find a great QB is like asking your poor uncle to go hit the lottery

and this is what happens when your hire DC after DC like we do........the GM doesn't even have a proper buffer when making these evaluations.....

Sidenote: that makes Saleh's comments(or lack thereof) about Zach's draft process interesting. What if he said I don't think this kid is a good fit for us and JD/Woody were already convinced that he was the guy? 

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So, when does the NFL get REAL creative and start dropping the OC/DC monikers and hiring OC/DC's to be head coaches?  

When the Offense is on the field, the OC is the head coach.  When the defense is on the field, the DC is the head coach.  Decisions about the team are made collectively, and the OC/DC decides which side of the ball needs what help and then goes to the GM with the needs.  The GM's job is to then go and fill those needs as best he/she can within the confines of the salary cap. If the GM can't fill all the needs, he needs to go back to his head coaches and tell them to figure out what they each can't live with on their perspective sides of the ball. 

In the current system, OC's will tell a head coach they need the most help.  DC's will tell the coach they need the most help.  The Head Coach will then tend to lean toward whichever side of the tree he came from.  Successful organizations never come up with the idea that "HEY!  What we need is MORE hierarchy!"  They find ways to empower their staff and reduce said hierarchy. 

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I've been saying this for quite some time now. Thanks for catching up, WaPo.

"Defensive" head coaches simply aren't going to be able to hire elite offensive coaching staffs to work under them. Why? Because elite offensive coaches also get hired as head coaches for more intelligently run teams than the NY Jets. What offensive coordinator and staff is a rookie HC like Saleh going to get? He's on his 2nd one already, and the guy is a product of nepotism and the luck of being liked by Aaron Rodgers personally. He hasn't proven successful on his own once.

Say what you want about the QB, but the teams that win because of the QB got there because their staff was able to identify the talent and develop it. It's not like Mahomes, Hurts etc were top 5 picks like Zach and Darnold and every other failure we draft.

This league is about offense 1st. Do something about, Woody. Or die off and let someone else try, PLEASE. Yes, I said it.

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I think too much is made of the "offensive vs. defensive" designation for a head coach.  If the head coach is operating as he is supposed to, it really shouldn't matter.  Give me a head coach who follows the following principals, and I'll be happy.

1. Balance.  Do not focus on one side of the football.  Oversee the entire team.
2. Discipline.  Strive to have the fewest penalties in the NFL.
3. Accountability.  Poor or undisciplined play gets you benched.  Whether it's for one drive, one half, one game, or multiple games.  Poor execution from a single player is a cancer that envelops the entire team.
4. Aggression.  Move away from the conservativism that plagues the entire league.  Embrace the analytics.  Punting on 4th and 5 from the opponent's 45 yard line in the name of "field position" is idiotic.  Stop going into prevent defenses at the end of halves, games, or when having a large lead.

End of the day, I don't care whether the head coach comes from an offensive or defensive background.  They should be surrounding themselves with a quality staff that worries about the day to day and play to play functions on their side of the ball.  Head coaching is about instilling a winning philosophy for the entire team, ensuring discipline, and holding people/units accountable.

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2 minutes ago, Randy Rasmussen said:

Just pointing out the offensive minded head coaches the Jets have hired in the last 50 years.
Charlie Winner
Lou Holtz
Joe Walton
Bruce Coslet
Rich Kotite
Al Groh
Adam Gase

None of them with the exception of Joe Walton playing with Walt Michaels roster were any good HCs



Sent from my iPhone using JetNation.com mobile app

Only Adam Gase counts, as those were entirely different eras of football. None of our defensive-minded coaches have worked out either. That just tells me Woody sucks at hiring the right coaches, and on top if it, he hires the wrong kind of bad coaches. Take your inheritance and go play in someone else's sandbox, Woody. You suck.

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2 minutes ago, DoubleDown said:

I think too much is made of the "offensive vs. defensive" designation for a head coach.  If the head coach is operating as he is supposed to, it really shouldn't matter.  Give me a head coach who follows the following principals, and I'll be happy.

1. Balance.  Do not focus on one side of the football.  Oversee the entire team.
2. Discipline.  Strive to have the fewest penalties in the NFL.
3. Accountability.  Poor or undisciplined play gets you benched.  Whether it's for one drive, one half, one game, or multiple games.  Poor execution from a single player is a cancer that envelops the entire team.
4. Aggression.  Move away from the conservativism that plagues the entire league.  Embrace the analytics.  Punting on 4th and 5 from the opponent's 45 yard line in the name of "field position" is idiotic.  Stop going into prevent defenses at the end of halves, games, or when having a large lead.

End of the day, I don't care whether the head coach comes from an offensive or defensive background.  They should be surrounding themselves with a quality staff that worries about the day to day and play to play functions on their side of the ball.  Head coaching is about instilling a winning philosophy for the entire team, ensuring discipline, and holding people/units accountable.

Balance isn't easy, because you can't balance the talent of the coaching staff. You get high-end (high-end enough to get a HC position) coaching on one side of the ball or the other. You rarely get both.

Look at this Jets team. Guys like Huff and Quincy Williams are HUGE contributors, because our defensive staff identified their talent and developed them. Who are the Huff and Quincy of the offense? Who is developing those guys? Our 2nd-rate offensive staff? Do you really expect a guy like Nate Hackett to develop late-round/undrafted FA players into stars like the defensive staff has? You need that. The top players on this offense are top players because they were drafted in early rounds, like they should be.

Balance works only if (1) you have already landed a star QB. A defensive stud HC paired with a star QB is going to do damage. WE, on the other hand, NEED TO FIND A QB. Until that happens, a defensive HC makes ZERO sense. The only other way it happens is if an established head coach convinces another established coordinator on the other side of the ball to work for him. But again, we don't have that. We only hire rookie HCs and proven failures like Adam Gase.

Woody needs to **** off. Harbaugh should be given a blank check this offseason. Only chance we have at fixing it. But he'll pass again. Payton has turned things around in Denver already. We had a shot at him too, a really good shot, but Woody won't pull the trigger.

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