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Tommy John Surgeries Pre and Post Pitch Clock Being Implemented


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Don’t see how it’s related to pitch clocks. This is the cumulative effect of pitchers trying to throw 98+ with ridiculous movement every pitch for the last ten years. 

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1 hour ago, PS17 said:

Don’t see how it’s related to pitch clocks. This is the cumulative effect of pitchers trying to throw 98+ with ridiculous movement every pitch for the last ten years. 

Exactly.  And with TJ surgery being increasingly effective and requiring less recovery time than it used to, pitchers are much more willing to make the move than ever before.  

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I have met multiple high school kids having Tommy John.  I treated a kid last year who had bone fragments in his elbow and needed cleanup surgery (at age 17).

These kids play well over 100 games a year from age 12 and up.   They train for max velocity, not to "pitch to contact", and their bodies can't handle it.  I'm currently treating a 17 year old HS junior girl for a 6 mm herniated disc in her lower back.  She did it by swinging so much, and literally playing 130 games a year for the last 3 years. 

I've also sent 12 and 13 year olds out for MRIs, showing stress fractures in their lower back.  Baseball kids playing so much they have stress fractures in their spine before they even make it to high school.

Maybe the adults are taking youth sports a little too serious?

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On 4/7/2024 at 5:12 PM, PS17 said:

Don’t see how it’s related to pitch clocks. This is the cumulative effect of pitchers trying to throw 98+ with ridiculous movement every pitch for the last ten years. 

It is exactly THIS. I raised a pitcher that did the travel ball circuit and ultimately played D1 and D3 baseball. 

The year round emphasis of throwing, playing, getting in front of college coaches and scouts is at and all time high, and is a true industry.

Kids are throwing all the time, all seasons. The things that they post are statements like "touched 88mph for the first time". It is max effort all of the time.

The arm just cannot withstand that stress. 

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On 4/8/2024 at 8:11 AM, chirorob said:

I have met multiple high school kids having Tommy John.  I treated a kid last year who had bone fragments in his elbow and needed cleanup surgery (at age 17).

These kids play well over 100 games a year from age 12 and up.   They train for max velocity, not to "pitch to contact", and their bodies can't handle it.  I'm currently treating a 17 year old HS junior girl for a 6 mm herniated disc in her lower back.  She did it by swinging so much, and literally playing 130 games a year for the last 3 years. 

I've also sent 12 and 13 year olds out for MRIs, showing stress fractures in their lower back.  Baseball kids playing so much they have stress fractures in their spine before they even make it to high school.

Maybe the adults are taking youth sports a little too serious?

I think the other piece of this is that kids are being encouraged to pick one sport and play it year round.  When I was a kid, spring was for baseball.  Fall was football or soccer.  Winter was basketball or hockey.   Intent was not necessarily to cross train, but in effect thats what we were doing. 

Novel idea, but youth sports used to be about kids playing a bunch of different sports and having fun.  

 

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Another factor in this is bad dads.  When my son was in LL, we had more than a few dads who would lie about pitch counts their boys threw on club teams the prior day.  So *wink wink* managers would let them go out and throw 60-75 pitches the day after they did pretty much the same thing.  More than a few ended up with elbow problems.  This is at ages 10-13 more or less.  

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1 hour ago, Lith said:

I think the other piece of this is that kids are being encouraged to pick one sport and play it year round.  When I was a kid, spring was for baseball.  Fall was football or soccer.  Winter was basketball or hockey.   Intent was not necessarily to cross train, but in effect thats what we were doing. 

Novel idea, but youth sports used to be about kids playing a bunch of different sports and having fun.  

Totally agree.  If you're throwing, you're always throwing. 

Growing up I had soccer, winter off, baseball, then 6 weeks off for summer.

Let the kids relax and have actual fun.

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1 hour ago, nycdan said:

Another factor in this is bad dads.  When my son was in LL, we had more than a few dads who would lie about pitch counts their boys threw on club teams the prior day.  So *wink wink* managers would let them go out and throw 60-75 pitches the day after they did pretty much the same thing.  More than a few ended up with elbow problems.  This is at ages 10-13 more or less.  

I used to coach little league when my son was playing.  One of the other coaches used to ride his own kid unmercifully.  These were probably like 10 year old kids at the time.  When asked why he was so hard on his kid, I remember him saying that he wanted his son to get a scholarship someday and the sooner he learned to handle pressure the better.

And we wonder why some kids grow up to hate playing organized sports.

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On 4/7/2024 at 5:12 PM, PS17 said:

Don’t see how it’s related to pitch clocks. This is the cumulative effect of pitchers trying to throw 98+ with ridiculous movement every pitch for the last ten years. 

That’s a winner 

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The one other factor I read about is since they got rid of spider tack.  Without that, pitchers have to squeeze the ball much harder, which puts pressure on the elbow.

Now, I don't think they should go back to that super glue stuff, but a decent, universal thing to have on the mound other than a resin bag might not be a bad idea.

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 4/14/2024 at 1:06 PM, Lith said:

I used to coach little league when my son was playing.  One of the other coaches used to ride his own kid unmercifully.  These were probably like 10 year old kids at the time.  When asked why he was so hard on his kid, I remember him saying that he wanted his son to get a scholarship someday and the sooner he learned to handle pressure the better.

And we wonder why some kids grow up to hate playing organized sports.

And/or why they hate their dads. 

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On 4/14/2024 at 11:10 AM, Lith said:

I think the other piece of this is that kids are being encouraged to pick one sport and play it year round.  When I was a kid, spring was for baseball.  Fall was football or soccer.  Winter was basketball or hockey.   Intent was not necessarily to cross train, but in effect thats what we were doing. 

Novel idea, but youth sports used to be about kids playing a bunch of different sports and having fun.  

 

Yep. I played baseball through college, but until I was about 16, we put away the bats and gloves and broke out a football or basketball the day after the World Series was over.

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