Jump to content

Can You Feel the Rivalry?


Recommended Posts

I can.

For years people have said "it's not a rivalry, the Yankees always win ".

Can you feel it now? I can. this is going to be the best season for

The Yanks/Sox always,always has had great games. Yankee/sox fans have lived it all,we know the rivalry is real but having the sox win, just made it real to everybody.

The haters....those foul,miserible son's of bitches who love to hate the Top Dog,the Head Honcho,the King of the Hill are all going to hate the sox,or atleast some of them will.

The roles have changed. I can't wait to see how it plays out.

Should be another great season of baseball between these 2 teams.

Ill see you guys in the ALCS,no doubt about it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I feel it...

The Yanks seem to be a little more hungry than the Red Sox. Matsui and ARod seem to be dialed in, while the Sox are still a little hungover from last October..

Yeah, he seemed really "dialed in" on that easy DP ball he managed to fumble today.

It's April, fellas. Calm down.

Link to post
Share on other sites

.....you should hear Sports Radio Talk in Boston - this is going to be an over-the-top season!!! God help me! :lol:

Even caught some of the live shots at teh televised party they are having at Fenway tonight in honor of the premier of Fever Pitch. 'wanna guess who got the loudest ovation? The most cheers? Huh? I'll tell yah who: TOM BRADY!

Link to post
Share on other sites
.....you should hear Sports Radio Talk in Boston - this is going to be an over-the-top season!!! God help me! :lol:

Even caught some of the live shots at teh televised party they are having at Fenway tonight in honor of the premier of Fever Pitch. 'wanna guess who got the loudest ovation? The most cheers? Huh? I'll tell yah who: TOM BRADY!

He deserves it, Garb ... that kid is Great

Man it hurts to say that, but its true ... SOB is Great ... and a class act too

Link to post
Share on other sites

He deserves it, Garb ... that kid is Great

Man it hurts to say that, but its true ... SOB is Great ... and a class act too

He's the best thing to happen to Boston since Nomar.

Link to post
Share on other sites

He is without question getting into that Larry Bird, Bobby Orr space. I'd say Ted Williams - but he never won a Championship - and although he is said to be the greatest hitter to ever play the game, I also hear he was an bastid - except with the Jimmy Fund Kids.

Link to post
Share on other sites
He is without question getting into that Larry Bird, Bobby Orr space. I'd say Ted Williams - but he never won a Championship - and although he is said to be the greatest hitter to ever play the game, I also hear he was an bastid - except with the Jimmy Fund Kids.

Garb, you wanna know how good Ted Williams was?

None of the players you mentioned above could even carry his jock-strap ... not Bird, not Orr, not Brady, not any of them ... championships or no championships

Ted Williams belongs in the same group with players like Ruth, Jordan, and Gretzky ... he was THAT DOMINANT

Link to post
Share on other sites

OKAY!!! I beleive you - never saw the guy play, but EVERYONE says he was the greatest hitter "EVAH" - so I'll take your word - everyone's word - for it.

Still, just speaking from what I have witnessed in my lifetime - and I have only faint memories of Orr -Bird, Orr and Brady, in that order for me.

Ooops (how could I possibly forget!!!)....and Troy Brown! :lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites
OKAY!!! I beleive you - never saw the guy play, but EVERYONE says he was the greatest hitter "EVAH" - so I'll take your word - everyone's word - for it.

Still, just speaking from what I have witnessed in my lifetime - and I have only faint memories of Orr -Bird, Orr and Brady, in that order for me.

Ooops (how could I possibly forget!!!)....and Troy Brown! :lol:

Yeah, in our lifetime {Boston athletes} that sounds about right

But if you go back to Orr, then you have to place Bill Russell at the top of that list

1. Russell

2. Bird

3. Orr

4. Brady

And Brady still has plenty of time to catch the first three

Link to post
Share on other sites
I can never shake the memory I have of watching the video where a young Ted Williams, being pitched baseballs with numbers written on them, would call out the number as they were pitched. Unreal.

TS, they have this really cool display at Cooperstown ... they constructed an entire strikezone with baseballs, and on each baseball they wrote Williams lifetime BA when the ball was pitched in that spot

If I recall, there was not ONE SPOT in the entire strikezone where Williams hit under .300 ... and a whole lot where he hit over .400

Link to post
Share on other sites

TS, they have this really cool display at Cooperstown ... they constructed an entire strikezone with baseballs, and on each baseball they wrote Williams lifetime BA when the ball was pitched in that spot

If I recall, there was not ONE SPOT in the entire strikezone where Williams hit under .300 ... and a whole lot where he hit over .400

That's ridiculous. Ham, did you catch the (I think) WFAN interview where Ted Williams and Tony Gwynn were being interviewed at the same time? It turned into Ted Williams giving tips to Tony freaking Gwynn about hitting and Gwynn just ate it up. This was the year where Gwynn was threatening the .400 mark for a season, and there was Ted Williams giving Gwynn his inside info. It was just classic. Gwynn, as well, was high class all the way.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's ridiculous. Ham, did you catch the (I think) WFAN interview where Ted Williams and Tony Gwynn were being interviewed at the same time? It turned into Ted Williams giving tips to Tony freaking Gwynn about hitting and Gwynn just ate it up. This was the year where Gwynn was threatening the .400 mark for a season, and there was Ted Williams giving Gwynn his inside info. It was just classic. Gwynn, as well, was high class all the way.

That was actually filmed as well ... and I saw the film

Gwynn was in awe of Ted Williams ... and what a class act Tony Gwynn is, not to mention a GREAT HITTER

Did you know Gwynn read Ted Williams book on hitting when he was a kid ... always viewed Williams as his true mentor, even before he met him, because he studied his book religiously {even as a major league all-star he never stopped studying that book for tips}

That's why Gwynn was so awe-struck that day ... because he literally idolized Ted Williams and viewed him as a mentor

I once heard Gwynn say that many big league hitters still read Ted Williams book on hitting till this day ... and he said the hitters who don't are cheating themselves

But yeah, that was a GREAT SHOW ... absolutely riviting

Link to post
Share on other sites

I never saw Ted Williams play, of course, being born in 1986. Ted bowed out with a homer in his last AB in 1960, if I'm not mistaken.

But the man was a legend. Yeah, he once spit at the fans. However, you guys were just talking about Tony Gwynn as a class act, but he once said "**** the fans" to the media. Nearly every player in the game will have some problem with fans or media in a 162 game season for 10+ years of your life. Its inevitable.

However, that doesnt make Ted any less of a legend in Boston, and to the nation, for that matter. After his career was over, as few may know, he gave managing a try with the Washington Senators expansion team (not the ORIGINAL Senators that became the Twins, mind you, but the expansion team that eventually became the Rangers). Anyways, it was a failure. Why? Because he was so far above the kids he was trying to teach. He'd say something like "you gotta try to hit the top half of the baseball" or something, and hell, these kids could barely hit the thing.

One day before a game, someone told Ted he should go up and take part in batting practice. The team pushed him to do it, and expected the out of shape Teddy Ballgame to whiff at a few pitches and make a fool of himself.

Nice try.

Ted hit line drive after line drive to a stunned audience, and walked back to the dugout. They couldnt believe what they just saw. Here was a guy old enough to be their fathers hitting it like one of them would.

Of course, Ted had a sense of humor about himself too, especially later on in life. When he was restricted to a wheelchair, one reporter asked him:

"hey Ted, if you were playing today, how would ya do?"

"I'd hit about .250"

"Why only .250, Ted?"

"Well, I'm 82 years old"

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, in our lifetime {Boston athletes} that sounds about right

But if you go back to Orr, then you have to place Bill Russell at the top of that list

1. Russell

2. Bird

3. Orr

4. Brady

And Brady still has plenty of time to catch the first three

I think longtime Bostonians would place Havilcheck above Brady on that list.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Of course, Ted had a sense of humor about himself too, especially later on in life. When he was restricted to a wheelchair, one reporter asked him:

"hey Ted, if you were playing today, how would ya do?"

"I'd hit about .250"

"Why only .250, Ted?"

"Well, I'm 82 years old"

It was actually Ty Cobb that said that, not Ted Williams.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ham: I saw that Ted Williams strikezone 2 years ago when i visited Cooperstown. I literally was speechless as I looked at everyball and saw the averages. It is one of the standout displays at the Hall. One otherb thing to note that has not been mentioned is that Ted accomplished so much despite losing FIVE PRIME YEARS by going to war. Twice.

If you ever make it to Fenway, go to the Ted Williams statue erected outside the park (I think around Gate B). It's a fitting tribute to a national hero.

Link to post
Share on other sites

here's more "rivalry fuel" from todays' Boston Herald:

Curt Schilling takes yet another shot at the Sox' arch-nemesis, Alex Rodriguez, in an upcoming edition of Sporting News. ``People in the media and fans don't get the look that we get on the field,'' he says. ``There are things he's done and said that I've heard I've seen that I have a huge problem with, and I think other guys do, too.'' The article examines

What is Curt talking about?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a universal rule:

Whenever Curt Schilling has an issue with another player--EVER--it is because of this: The player he has a problem with is stealing Curt's spotlight. That is, was, and always will be the case.

For instance, do you know Randy Wolf, the OK pitcher for the Phillies? He has his own huge fan club in Philly. Now, why would Philly fans start a fan club for an average pitcher, you ask? Well, Philly fans started the Wolf Pack solely as a slap at Schilling because Schilling can't handle anybody else being the center of attention. Ever. Philly fans CHEERED when that douchebag was traded. And Philly sucks!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Here is a universal rule:

Whenever Curt Schilling has an issue with another player--EVER--it is because of this: The player he has a problem with is stealing Curt's spotlight. That is, was, and always will be the case.

For instance, do you know Randy Wolf, the OK pitcher for the Phillies? He has his own huge fan club in Philly. Now, why would Philly fans start a fan club for an average pitcher, you ask? Well, Philly fans started the Wolf Pack solely as a slap at Schilling because Schilling can't handle anybody else being the center of attention. Ever. Philly fans CHEERED when that douchebag was traded. And Philly sucks!

I met Randy Wolf's brother, Jim, a major league umpire, a couple of years back. Funny who you meet at the trendy spots - anyway, I asked him who was the most reviled player in baseball - without hestitating, he said Barry Bonds. Now, why didn't he say Schilling?

I agree with you, however, that Schilling LOVES to hear himself talk. Still, I would rather hear his coherent babble instead of the bull-sh*t and idiocy that comes out of Millar and Damon's mouths.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Ham: I saw that Ted Williams strikezone 2 years ago when i visited Cooperstown. I literally was speechless as I looked at everyball and saw the averages. It is one of the standout displays at the Hall. One otherb thing to note that has not been mentioned is that Ted accomplished so much despite losing FIVE PRIME YEARS by going to war. Twice.

If you ever make it to Fenway, go to the Ted Williams statue erected outside the park (I think around Gate B). It's a fitting tribute to a national hero.

That's why I dismiss all that BS from the media lefties about Ted Williams being such a bad guy

Yeah, he was a bad guy because he told the media to go jump in a lake ... uh, that only makes me like him more

And sure he had some bad moments with the fans, but you know what, the fans are not blameless either

We like to pretend the fans are totally pure, but that is a load of BS ... sometimes the fans act like ungrateful slobs {withness Yankee fans booing Mariano Rivera} ... well they booed Ted Williams at Fenway too {again, booing an immortal in his own house}, so I can't blame Williams for being pissed ... here is one of the greatest hitters who ever lived {if not thee greatest}, and some drunks in the stands are booing him in his own yard?

Lastly, I place a WHOLE LOT of stock in his status as a bona-fide war hero ... he was not perfect, as no man is, but that is a HUGE PLUS on his side of the ledger when you look at the mans entire life

Its easy to cherry-pick only THE BAD if you want to portray Williams as a BAD GUY, but when you weigh THE GOOD with THE BAD, IMO Ted Williams comes out smelling like a rose

The man was an authentic war hero who was perhaps the greatest hitter who ever lived ... in both cases he gave his very best for his country and for his game

Someone once said to Ted Williams ....

Hey Ted, you know that character John Wayne plays in the movies ... he's playing YOU

Too which Ted Williams responded ... YEAH, I KNOW IT!!

Typical Ted Williams ... truly American in style and demeanor ... its been said that ONLY AMERICA could produce a Ted Williams ... he was quintesential America

Link to post
Share on other sites

One more thing ... that line from THE NATURAL was stolen from Ted Williams

He used to say that when his playing days are over, he wants to walk down the street and have people say ....

There Goes Ted Williams, the Greatest hitter who ever lived

If he didn't WILLINGLY lose four years of his career to two wars, that probably would have been a slam-dunk

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



×
×
  • Create New...