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Remember Rick Ankiel


shawn306

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He has made it all the way back to the majors now as an Outfielder.

http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20070809&content_id=2139385&vkey=news_mlb&fext=.jsp&c_id=mlb

Ankiel making Cardinals return

Pitcher-turned-outfielder expected in starting lineup Thursday

By Daniel Berk / MLB.com

ST.LOUIS -- Let the Rick Ankiel era begin -- again.

The St. Louis Cardinals purchased the contract of Ankiel from Triple-A Memphis on Thursday, and the outfielder is expected to be in the starting lineup for tonight's game against the Padres.

Ankiel was batting .267 with a league-leading 32 homers and 89 RBIs in 102 games at Memphis.

Ankiel first appeared in the big leagues in 1999 as a pitcher with the Cards. After a promising start, his career took a dramatic turn for the worse in the 2000 playoffs.

Chosen as the Game 1 starter of the NLDS against the Braves, Ankiel walked six batters and threw five wild pitches. In another postseason appearance against the Mets, the young lefty threw four more wild pitches in 1 1/3 innings.

Ankiel then started six games for the Cards in 2001 before missing the 2002 season and a chunk of the 2003 and 2004 seasons with left elbow problems that required Tommy John elbow reconstruction surgery.

The 28-year-old was last in the big leagues in 2004 when he made five relief appearances. After that season, Ankiel was planning on leaving the game of baseball, but was persuaded to come back as a hitter by Cardinals general manager Walt Jocketty.

Ankiel started his comeback as a hitter in 2005 when he split time between Class A Quad Cities and Double-A Springfield. He missed the 2006 season after undergoing left knee surgery

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He has made it all the way back to the majors now as an Outfielder.

http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20070809&content_id=2139385&vkey=news_mlb&fext=.jsp&c_id=mlb

Ankiel making Cardinals return

Pitcher-turned-outfielder expected in starting lineup Thursday

By Daniel Berk / MLB.com

ST.LOUIS -- Let the Rick Ankiel era begin -- again.

The St. Louis Cardinals purchased the contract of Ankiel from Triple-A Memphis on Thursday, and the outfielder is expected to be in the starting lineup for tonight's game against the Padres.

Ankiel was batting .267 with a league-leading 32 homers and 89 RBIs in 102 games at Memphis.

Ankiel first appeared in the big leagues in 1999 as a pitcher with the Cards. After a promising start, his career took a dramatic turn for the worse in the 2000 playoffs.

Chosen as the Game 1 starter of the NLDS against the Braves, Ankiel walked six batters and threw five wild pitches. In another postseason appearance against the Mets, the young lefty threw four more wild pitches in 1 1/3 innings.

Ankiel then started six games for the Cards in 2001 before missing the 2002 season and a chunk of the 2003 and 2004 seasons with left elbow problems that required Tommy John elbow reconstruction surgery.

The 28-year-old was last in the big leagues in 2004 when he made five relief appearances. After that season, Ankiel was planning on leaving the game of baseball, but was persuaded to come back as a hitter by Cardinals general manager Walt Jocketty.

Ankiel started his comeback as a hitter in 2005 when he split time between Class A Quad Cities and Double-A Springfield. He missed the 2006 season after undergoing left knee surgery

Good for him. I have never seen a pitcher completely lose control like he did. He just "lost it." He was hitting the backstop on some of his pitches.

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Sasser was a catcher for the Mets late 80's early 90's I think.

Blass was pitcher for Pirates and actually a pretty good one. He won game 7 of the 1971 World Series against the Orioles and I wanna say around 1973 or 1974 he couldn't even find home plate anymore. He was out of baseball like a year later.

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Sasser was a catcher for the Mets late 80's early 90's I think.

Blass was pitcher for Pirates and actually a pretty good one. He won game 7 of the 1971 World Series against the Orioles and I wanna say around 1973 or 1974 he couldn't even find home plate anymore. He was out of baseball like a year later.

Thanks for that. It's weird how some players just lose it out of nowhere.

Ian Baker-Finch was an Aussie golfer who won the British Open in 1990 I think. A few years later he couldn't break 80 and is now a commentator.

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Sasser was a catcher for the Mets late 80's early 90's I think.

Blass was pitcher for Pirates and actually a pretty good one. He won game 7 of the 1971 World Series against the Orioles and I wanna say around 1973 or 1974 he couldn't even find home plate anymore. He was out of baseball like a year later.

The affliction that affects baseball players is humorously referred to as "Steve Blass disease"

Blass has been a commentator for the Pirates for a couple of decades and is pretty joking about what afflicted him. A pretty decent guy to listen to, if not a bit goofy.

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Blass must have been before my time as I don't remember him. Sasser sounds some what familiar. Did he pitch in the 80's?

Sasser was painful to watch. Numerous times they would just have the umpire throw the ball back, if no one was on base. If a runner would steal, or attempt to steal straight up, he could make the throw. But runners started to take advantage when he would be yo-yoing his arm in throws back to the pitcher.

These mental blocks are amazing things. The pitcher that leveleed teh Red infielder in teh face a few weeks ago, has ben having issues now. Often, when a pitcher unintentionally beans a batter, they have a hard time regaining their command or pitching inside.

I read the book "the Pitch that Killed" many years ago, and it was an interesting read. It recounted Carl Mays (a Yankee) beaning Ray Chapman. He collapsed on the field. The story follows Mays after this incident. A good read.

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The affliction that affects baseball players is humorously referred to as "Steve Blass disease"

Blass has been a commentator for the Pirates for a couple of decades and is pretty joking about what afflicted him. A pretty decent guy to listen to, if not a bit goofy.

"Steve Blass disease." Thats funny. I guess Wang had the 24 hour Steve Blass flu yesterday.

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I remember the Mets moved Sasser to the OF for a bit because he had a decent stick but I guess it just didn't work out. I do remember him gunning Barry Bonds out from RF at 3B though when Bonds was with the Pirates.

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Steve Sax and Chuck Knoblauch were two other guys just developed a mental block when throwing the ball. Knoblauch became bad enough that Torre had to move him to the outfield.

Yeah, but Sax kind of got over that later in his career. Knoblauch was ruined by hitting Keith Olberman's mom with an errant throw and his smoking hot wife dumping him. he fell apart after that. and if you ever saw his ex-wife you will know why.

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They've had the Ankiel watch in Sports Illustrated each week for the past like 2 or 3 seasons and now he's finally back in the majors. Good for him and best of luck. I remember watching him play up in Sussex County, NJ for the Cardinals' then Class A New Jersey Cardinals years and years ago.

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Now that you guys mentioned Steve Sax, I had a thought pop into my mind. What if Orel Hersheiser, married Steve Sax.........his name would become Orel.....nevermind. :P

That one made me LOL...good one.

Oh, and they'd both reside in Boston BTW

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