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Hey Southern Jet some good cowboy movies


SoFlaJets

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Westerns shoot their way back to the big screen

Brad Pitt: He'll star inThe Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford.

Despite the tombstones erected over the years by pundits and analysts, the Western never really died. It has just been suffering a gut shot.

This fall, though, it's blazing back to theaters with movies that range from the contemporary to the legendary:

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i will chjeck this out if the overall national review consensus id fair or above,,

Russel Crowe and Christian Bale-how could it NOT be good ya know?

You see Bale in The Machinist? The dude went and lost 63 pounds for that role-anybody with that kind of commitment....

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Russel Crowe and Christian Bale-how could it NOT be good ya know?

You see Bale in The Machinist? The dude went and lost 63 pounds for that role-anybody with that kind of commitment....

ya, i saw,, pretty good movie,,edgy,,

u just never know with westerns, ,regardless of stars,, hopefully its good,,,

i will judge vs Silverado :P

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ya, i saw,, pretty good movie,,edgy,,

u just never know with westerns, ,regardless of stars,, hopefully its good,,,

i will judge vs Silverado :P

Heaven's Gate was a great western but for some reason the Hollywood establishment had it out for Michael Cimino-and absolutely killed the movie but it was still a great flick

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Bale was awesome in one of my favorite movies, american psycho.

he's starting to make a name for himself ain't he Joe? I love when you can watch an artist grow like that-Leo DiCaprio is another case of an actor just getting better and better-how great was he in The Departed? Not good, GREAT....

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he's starting to make a name for himself ain't he Joe? I love when you can watch an artist grow like that-Leo DiCaprio is another case of an actor just getting better and better-how great was he in The Departed? Not good, GREAT....

True, but DiCaprio was always good, just took some bubblegum roles. Look at The Basketball Diaries as a great example.

Bale is great, he was good in that goofy magician movie too, and of course batman.

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True, but DiCaprio was always good, just took some bubblegum roles. Look at The Basketball Diaries as a great example.

Bale is great, he was good in that goofy magician movie too, and of course batman.

Did you see (the author) Jim Carroll's cameo in The Basketball Diaries Joe? He looked like a wax figure...I saw him at The Ritz when he came out with his debut album with People Who Died-that had to be around winter '82-he had a big green day glow crucifix around his neck-man was I high that night

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Did you see (the author) Jim Carroll's cameo in The Basketball Diaries Joe? He looked like a wax figure...I saw him at The Ritz when he came out with his debut album with People Who Died-that had to be around winter '82-he had a big green day glow crucifix around his neck-man was I high that night

Didn't know he was in it. That was one sick movie, but that is what it is like, you get caught in the web and life turns to hell. They did a great job depicting it in the movie.

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15 Must-See Westerns

ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST (1969)

After Clint Eastwood returned to Hollywood to cash in on his newfound spaghetti-western fame (see The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly later in this photo gallery), it was time for him to move beyond the western. But his old partner in Italy, Sergio Leone, still had one last tumbleweed epic left to tell. And boy does he tell it. Charles Bronson is a man with a harmonica and a long-simmering vendetta. Jason Robards is a desperado who may or may not be what he seems. And Henry Fonda, dressed all in black and cast fiendishly against aw-shucks type, is the villain whose blood runs as cold as ice. Leone's film is an eye-candy opera of brutality.

RED RIVER (1948)

With Howard Hawks behind the camera instead of John Ford, character and dialogue take precedence over sweeping panoramas. The result: John Wayne is absolutely hypnotic (the guy could be a hell of an actor when he wanted) as a grizzled rustler leading an Odyssian cattle drive from Texas to Missouri. The real treat, however, is Montgomery Clift as his rebellious son. He smolders and shoots off sparks like a half-extinguished campfire.

LONESOME DOVE (1989)

There was no way they were gonna squeeze Larry McMurtry's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel into a two-hour film. That's why God (or was it Brandon Tartikoff?) created the TV miniseries. Is eight hours' worth of cattle drives, stampedes, and shootouts too much? Not when the ornery Tommy Lee Jones and Robert Duvall (pictured, with Rick Schroder) are in the saddle. You'll want to rent this one, then call in ''sick'' for a couple of days.

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BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID (1969)

Paul Newman and Robert Redford are almost too good-looking to be in any movie set in the Old West. And adding Katherine Ross as Redford's easy-on-the-eyes love interest doesn't make matters any more believable. But get beyond that and what you're left with is one of the greatest

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THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY (1967)

Clint Eastwood's third and final collaboration with spaghetti-western maestro Sergio Leone brings The Man With No Name trilogy to a baroque close. Everything here is epic: Clint's poncho and squint; Ennio Morricone's score; and the film's three-hour running time. Leone wasn't easily restrained, and after the success of A Fistful of Dollars and For a Few Dollars More, he was given a free hand to make this three-way hunt for Civil War gold as bloody and mythic as he wanted. And thank goodness for that. With the snake-eyed Lee Van Cleef as ''The Bad'' and the fabulous Eli Wallach as ''The Ugly.''

THE SEARCHERS (1956)

The legendary John Ford and his swaggering muse John Wayne head to postcard-perfect Monument Valley and saddle up for what is arguably the greatest western of all time. The Duke's battle-scarred Ethan Edwards has returned from the Civil War only to be sucked into a five-year search for his niece (Natalie Wood) and her Comanche kidnappers. It's like Apocalypse Now on horseback.

TOMBSTONE (1993)

A victim of bad timing (it came out within six months of Kevin Costner's Wyatt Earp), Tombstone is an under-seen and too-easily-dismissed riff on the OK Corral story. Kurt Russell is swell as Earp, but it's Val Kilmer's tubercular Doc Holliday who steals the show. He's swishy, lethal, and with each cough, one step closer to the Big Roundup in the Sky. His performance here gets my vote for The Best Overacting of 1993.

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SHANE (1953)

A retired gunslinger (Alan Ladd) lends a hand to a family of struggling homesteaders (Van Heflin, Jean Arthur). The family's tow-headed moppet (Brandon De Wilde) takes to the stranger. Then the stranger must strap on his gun to protect the family from an evil landowner and his ruthless henchmen. As set-ups go, that's about as stripped down as they get. What's unexpected about Shane, though, is just how much heart director George Stevens shoehorns into his western weapie and just how badass Jack Palance is when his Man in Black finally swaggers onscreen late in the film. ''Shane! Come Back

THE WILD BUNCH (1969)

They didn't call director Sam Peckinpah ''Bloody Sam'' for nothing. This is the Wild West as a meatgrinder. William Holden (pictured, second from right), as grizzled and world-weary as western antiheroes come, leads a band of bank robbers south of the border, one step ahead of the equally grizzled and world-weary Robert Ryan. The infamous finale

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