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The Truth About Flatulence (For Ward & Beav)


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BY KATHY WOLLARD |Special to Newsday February 18, 2008 817-grey.gif health;ptype=s;slug=ny-hshow5582479feb18;rg=ur;ref=newsdaycom;pos=1;sz=88x31;tile=2;ord=26116610?

How and why does the human body produce wind? What causes the odor of gas? asks Nayna Kumari, via e-mail.

Whether we call it breaking wind, passing gas or something more impolite, everyone experiences flatulence. And it's not just we humans; creatures from farm animals to household pets get gassy, too. (Looking pointedly at the dog, in fact, is a favorite way to dodge flatulence blame in a small room.)

Gastroenterologists say most people pass gas about 10 to 20 times a day. And just as in the old saying "Horses sweat; men perspire; women glow," females seem favored in the flatulence department, too. Because women's bodies are usually smaller than men's, they may pass less gas. According to Dr. Michael Levitt, a gastroenterologist and flatulence expert in Minneapolis, if the average man's gassy output amounts to about five cups a day, the average woman's might be three.

Intestinal gas builds up when food isn't completely digested. Food that is digested only partially in its trip through the stomach and the 20-plus feet of the small intestine passes into the large intestine (colon). The colon is where last-chance digestion goes on, as bacteria work on breaking down leftover food before it leaves the body as waste.

Bacteria quickly multiply as they get to work on fiber and other undigested carbohydrates. As they break down, or "ferment" food, gases are a byproduct. It's the same story when yeast fungi break down sugars in bread dough; the carbon dioxide they release makes the dough swell and expand. And just as dough rises, so do our doughy abdomens distend a bit from trapped gases. Some of the gas is absorbed into the body and bloodstream. And some is (embarrassingly) expelled into the air.

Some foods make us more gassy than others. Beans, beans, the musical fruit ... er, legume? The more you eat, the more you clear the room?

According to Levitt, beans top the gas and bloating list for most people. Besides lots of fiber, beans contain complex sugars that aren't broken down until they reach the colon. Other foods high on the flatulence charts include cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage and broccoli, as well as "sugar alcohols" like sorbitol.

Suddenly upping the fiber in your diet also can cause bloating. If your body doesn't produce the enzyme that breaks down lactose (milk sugar), dairy foods can be the culprit. And then there's plain old swallowed air.

The main ingredients in passed gas - nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and methane - are odorless. That's why natural gas suppliers add smelly sulfurous compounds to the mostly-methane gas piped to your stove or furnace. The rotten-egg odor can alert you to a dangerous gas leak. Likewise, what gives intestinal gas its often unpleasant odor are traces of sulfur compounds, plus pungent chemicals like indole and skatole.

Intestinal bacteria produce these smelly compounds as they work on fermenting food. (So do between-teeth bacteria, contributing to the noxious odor of bad breath.) But in a twist, tiny traces of indole and skatole also help create the flowery fragrance of orange blossoms, as well as many perfumes.

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BY KATHY WOLLARD |Special to Newsday February 18, 2008 817-grey.gif health;ptype=s;slug=ny-hshow5582479feb18;rg=ur;ref=newsdaycom;pos=1;sz=88x31;tile=2;ord=26116610?

How and why does the human body produce wind? What causes the odor of gas? asks Nayna Kumari, via e-mail.

Whether we call it breaking wind, passing gas or something more impolite, everyone experiences flatulence. And it's not just we humans; creatures from farm animals to household pets get gassy, too. (Looking pointedly at the dog, in fact, is a favorite way to dodge flatulence blame in a small room.)

Gastroenterologists say most people pass gas about 10 to 20 times a day. And just as in the old saying "Horses sweat; men perspire; women glow," females seem favored in the flatulence department, too. Because women's bodies are usually smaller than men's, they may pass less gas. According to Dr. Michael Levitt, a gastroenterologist and flatulence expert in Minneapolis, if the average man's gassy output amounts to about five cups a day, the average woman's might be three.

Intestinal gas builds up when food isn't completely digested. Food that is digested only partially in its trip through the stomach and the 20-plus feet of the small intestine passes into the large intestine (colon). The colon is where last-chance digestion goes on, as bacteria work on breaking down leftover food before it leaves the body as waste.

Bacteria quickly multiply as they get to work on fiber and other undigested carbohydrates. As they break down, or "ferment" food, gases are a byproduct. It's the same story when yeast fungi break down sugars in bread dough; the carbon dioxide they release makes the dough swell and expand. And just as dough rises, so do our doughy abdomens distend a bit from trapped gases. Some of the gas is absorbed into the body and bloodstream. And some is (embarrassingly) expelled into the air.

Some foods make us more gassy than others. Beans, beans, the musical fruit ... er, legume? The more you eat, the more you clear the room?

According to Levitt, beans top the gas and bloating list for most people. Besides lots of fiber, beans contain complex sugars that aren't broken down until they reach the colon. Other foods high on the flatulence charts include cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage and broccoli, as well as "sugar alcohols" like sorbitol.

Suddenly upping the fiber in your diet also can cause bloating. If your body doesn't produce the enzyme that breaks down lactose (milk sugar), dairy foods can be the culprit. And then there's plain old swallowed air.

The main ingredients in passed gas - nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and methane - are odorless. That's why natural gas suppliers add smelly sulfurous compounds to the mostly-methane gas piped to your stove or furnace. The rotten-egg odor can alert you to a dangerous gas leak. Likewise, what gives intestinal gas its often unpleasant odor are traces of sulfur compounds, plus pungent chemicals like indole and skatole.

Intestinal bacteria produce these smelly compounds as they work on fermenting food. (So do between-teeth bacteria, contributing to the noxious odor of bad breath.) But in a twist, tiny traces of indole and skatole also help create the flowery fragrance of orange blossoms, as well as many perfumes.

this explains alot

Method for retaining softness in raisins

Document Type and Number:

United States Patent 4103035

Link to this page:

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/4103035.html

Abstract:

A method is disclosed for treating raisins and other whole dried fruit to provide a significant humectant content therein and to improve softness retention under storage conditions. The raisins are first treated with a hot, weak acid and are then washed and treated with glycerol, sorbitol, or other humectants, followed by washing and controlled drying to a moisture content of about from 12% to 20%.

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this explains alot

Method for retaining softness in raisins

Document Type and Number:

United States Patent 4103035

Link to this page:

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/4103035.html

Abstract:

A method is disclosed for treating raisins and other whole dried fruit to provide a significant humectant content therein and to improve softness retention under storage conditions. The raisins are first treated with a hot, weak acid and are then washed and treated with glycerol, sorbitol, or other humectants, followed by washing and controlled drying to a moisture content of about from 12% to 20%.

interesting. refutes my wife's belief that The Night From Hell was something i did "on purpose."

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interesting. refutes my wife's belief that The Night From Hell was something i did "on purpose."

well i am sure she is still half right,,how hard did you try and hold them in,,especially after the first 20 or so :(..holdin them i ndoesnt run in our family :D

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well i am sure she is still half right,,how hard did you try and hold them in,,especially after the first 20 or so :(..holdin them i ndoesnt run in our family :D

well the first few woke me up, after that i let then next 20 out because it was funny. but after those i let them out because i was afraid my colon was going to explode if i didn't. if you have ever cried and laughed at the same time, you know how i was feeling at that time.

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well the first few woke me up, after that i let then next 20 out because it was funny. but after those i let them out because i was afraid my colon was going to explode if i didn't. if you have ever cried and laughed at the same time, you know how i was feeling at that time.

fart.jpg

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well the first few woke me up, after that i let then next 20 out because it was funny. but after those i let them out because i was afraid my colon was going to explode if i didn't. if you have ever cried and laughed at the same time, you know how i was feeling at that time.

fart.jpg

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well the first few woke me up, after that i let then next 20 out because it was funny. but after those i let them out because i was afraid my colon was going to explode if i didn't. if you have ever cried and laughed at the same time, you know how i was feeling at that time.

fart.jpg

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